PDA

View Full Version : What does "a window of time" mean to you?



virtualcomposer
11-04-2008, 03:13 PM
Just wondering what the phrase "a window of time" means to you. If someone said you're only at a job for a window of time, what would you think? Or if there was a product that is being sold for a window of time, what does that usually mean? 6 months? 2 months? I've always wondered what that truely meant and I know we've got allot smart people on this forum so I value your thoughts. :)

RollerJesus
11-04-2008, 03:17 PM
How long is a piece of string? All it means to me is that it is not permanent.

Hopper
11-04-2008, 03:39 PM
It's simply a term used to define an arbitrary, but measurable period of time.

It very similar to the part of your original post "...I know we've got allot smart people...". How many do you define as "a lot"? 4? 25? 12,647?

virtualcomposer
11-04-2008, 03:49 PM
How long is a piece of string? All it means to me is that it is not permanent.

So not permanent as in, not long from now, or temporary and prepare soon because time is almost up?

virtualcomposer
11-04-2008, 03:52 PM
It's simply a term used to define an arbitrary, but measurable period of time.

It very similar to the part of your original post "...I know we've got allot smart people...". How many do you define as "a lot"? 4? 25? 12,647?

Well, like "some of the time" means relatively 25% or less vs "half of the time" meaning 50% or "most of the time" meaning 75% or more. At least that's how I've viewed those phrases. To me, a window of time means "not long from now" or the next couple months. Does this sound like what you think as well? It's not measured time but it's assumed of relative time.

TripD
11-04-2008, 04:21 PM
Hmmm.... I've not seen a 'window' used in a statistical sense. That's a new one for me! :)

Tom Wood
11-04-2008, 04:33 PM
The window of time is the period of time where your actions may have consequence. For example, the window of time where you can vote in the 2008 fall election is rapidly closing. It opened the day early voting opened, then closed at the end of early voting, then opened again this morning, and is now about to close forever. It's not an arbitrary or generically set length because it depends on the situation. An auction at eBay occurs during a specifically set window of time. Maybe it's really more like two gates on each end of a period of time?

virtualcomposer
11-04-2008, 04:45 PM
The window of time is the period of time where your actions may have consequence. For example, the window of time where you can vote in the 2008 fall election is rapidly closing. It opened the day early voting opened, then closed at the end of early voting, then opened again this morning, and is now about to close forever. It's not an arbitrary or generically set length because it depends on the situation. An auction at eBay occurs during a specifically set window of time. Maybe it's really more like two gates on each end of a period of time?

I like what you said. My wife's boss said to her a couple months ago that she'll be a teacher at the school she works at for only a window of time and perhaps another position would open up after that. Since then, I've really wondered what that term really meant without all of the assumptions. I really liked your definition though. Helps me understand a little better about the term.

Hopper
11-04-2008, 04:56 PM
It's not measured time but it's assumed of relative time.
Yes. I would say it's relative to the context in which its used. Maybe I can modify my own definition with:

"It's simply a term used to define an arbitrary, but measurable period of time as it pertains to a specific event or context."

Example...
A "window" as it pertains to someone's lifetime vs. a "window" as it pertains to the approximate time for a chemical reaction to take place, which could be a fraction of a second or several years, etc....

So in your case, it could mean, the amount of time it will take for a position to open up for your wife. It's arbitrary, yet you know it wouldn't be a fraction of a second nor 20 years (hopefully).

hunter
11-04-2008, 05:23 PM
Sounds like a Dali painting to me. :dance:

Jim_C
11-04-2008, 05:29 PM
Does the window become smaller if the time is described as an 'opportunity'?

wp_capozzi
11-04-2008, 06:51 PM
If you think about it along with Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, a single event viewed by more than one person in different locations will appear different to each of those people. Time dilation could be perceived, depending on who you are talking to.

I would say it is quite variable. If you are waiting for the time window to open, or racing to catch it before it closes.

Dexter2999
11-04-2008, 08:51 PM
Window, means not permanent. There is an opening and a closing. If she isn't offered a Full time position before the closing, they will possibly offer the temp position to another person. Of course there is a chance they could give her another Window if a suitable position doesn't come available while she is waiting.

cresshead
11-05-2008, 10:43 AM
actually it's 'window of opportunity'...which then got morphed into window of time cos some people don't know what an opportunity is even if it slapped them in the face!:D:twak:

akademus
11-05-2008, 11:58 AM
I would connect "window of time" to a "time frame" and hurry up to finish the things before it expires (or closes, whichever comes first :D )!