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View Full Version : Interesting Wired-article about NewTek's early history



Sande
10-10-2008, 02:54 PM
While surfing the web I came by an interesting article about NewTek's early phases. This was first published by Wired already in 1994 (I think) so some of you may already have seen this, but I had not seen this before myself and enjoyed reading about NewTek's history so I decided to post this anyway...

Wired's article about NewTek: Flying Toasters (http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/2.05/flying.toasters_pr.html)

It was also cool to read how much Tim and others appreciated Amiga - my favourite computer of all time. :)

PS. What happened to Screamer?

Matt
10-10-2008, 03:56 PM
It was also cool to read how much Tim and others appreciated Amiga - my favourite computer of all time. :)

If it wasn't for the Amiga (my first ever computer) I would never have been so interested in Babylon 5, and thus never interested in LightWave, so, quite literally, the Amiga changed the course of my entire life.

Sande
10-10-2008, 04:20 PM
If it wasn't for the Amiga (my first ever computer) I would never have been so interested in Babylon 5, and thus never interested in LightWave, so, quite literally, the Amiga changed the course of my entire life.

I already had Commodore 64 before Amiga, but I can also say that it was Amiga that really set the course for my life - I would probably have never even dreamed of becoming a graphics artist without Amiga.

beverins
10-10-2008, 08:39 PM
If it wasn't for the Amiga (my first ever computer) I would never have been so interested in Babylon 5, and thus never interested in LightWave, so, quite literally, the Amiga changed the course of my entire life.

WOW! Same as me :-)

Well, the Amiga wasn't my first. First was the VIC, then the C64 then the Amiga. And from there, Lightwave.

shrox
10-10-2008, 08:56 PM
I had an opportunity to design the toaster packaging in 199something, but the art school was so bad then the faculty couldn't even explain what the Video Toaster was, and of course we could not touch it. If I had known what was in that box, my life would have been much different.

akademus
10-11-2008, 01:28 AM
I had amiga back in early nineties, but I stumbled upon Newtek and Lightwave when I got my first PC (1995 that was).

Those were cool days!!!

Matt
10-11-2008, 03:49 AM
Same thing for me and a lot of my friends. The Amiga set the course of our lives in many ways.

And to think, the entire reason I bought an Amiga 500 way back was because my friend showed me NoiseTracker, I fell in love with it.

So technically speaking, I have NoiseTracker to thank for being here!

:D

spiroz
10-11-2008, 11:44 AM
And to think, the entire reason I bought an Amiga 500 way back was because my friend showed me NoiseTracker, I fell in love with it.

So technically speaking, I have NoiseTracker to thank for being here!

:D

Oh, quite the same story as me then..
The moment I heard a certain Blue Monday-module on NoiseTracker, the course was set..

Bog
10-11-2008, 12:34 PM
Again, VIC > 64 > Amiga > Babylon 5 > LightWave Animator and never looked back.

Personally, I think the times are plenty cool right now, and it just looks like getting better. So much fun to be had. I remember walking around computer shows and getting simultaneously excited and depressed looking at Silicon Graphics workstations running PowerAnimator and Softimage. Wow, wow - how insanely cool to be able to do things like that! Sadly, the computers were $60,000 and the software $45,000.

Now you can kick the crap out of anything those boxes could do for well under $2,000 from a cold start. Then get it out globally for the price of an internet connection - or ducking into a 'net cafe with a $10 thumbdrive. Limits? We don't got no steenkin' limits!

NewTek - keeping the future futurey and fun. Cheers boys and girls!

gerry_g
10-11-2008, 03:06 PM
Used to do corporate vid in the eighties and the guys who did all the graphic intros for us did them in LW on Amigas, and I'd say wow I'd kill for this sort of kit but could never really afford it and they'd say relax ten years from now you'll be doing this sort of stuff on a home PC and I'd say yeah right as if, so I think Bog has it about right, then might have been the glory days but now is really where it's at.