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Stunt Pixels
10-07-2008, 06:18 PM
Just out of curiosity I'm wondering how many countries have the option of getting all electricity for your house from "green energy"? We do here in Australia - all energy for our house comes from wind power.

What other countries have this as an option people can sign up to?

Intuition
10-07-2008, 06:24 PM
There are geothermal plants in northern California.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geothermal_power

Its a pretty neat source of energy.

My home state of Wyoming could use wind power. Seems like the wind never stops there.

jameswillmott
10-07-2008, 06:24 PM
You have a windfarm attached to your house? :)

Lightwolf
10-07-2008, 06:24 PM
We've got the option in Germany as well. It doesn't mean that you get the green energy though, since the electricity comes from the national grid. However, it means that whatever you use is being fed into the grid from green sources.

Austria has the option as well and I suppose most other European countries do as well.

Cheers,
Mike

Stunt Pixels
10-07-2008, 06:33 PM
You have a windfarm attached to your house? :)

I would, but the neighbors might complain... :)

Naah, it's like Lightwolf said. If we use 16000 thingyamebobs of electricity, our supplier has to source 16000 thingyamebobs from windfarms. It's all audited and double checked. It's also interesting in that our government has legislated a percentage of electricity to come from green sources, and optional selection of green energy is additional to the base green supply.

Hey Lightwolf, what are the green sources over there? We are lucky in that there is just a massive amount of unused land, so they can throw huge windfarms and solar farms away from population centers. I've always wondered how they do this in Europe...

Lightwolf
10-07-2008, 06:40 PM
Hey Lightwolf, what are the green sources over there? We are lucky in that there is just a massive amount of unused land, so they can throw huge windfarms and solar farms away from population centers. I've always wondered how they do this in Europe...
Mainly water, allthough wind is catching up, they're currently planning a massive farm off the (tiny) coast we have.
The national mix is currently 13% renewable (6% wind and sun, 6%water, 1% others), 29% nuclear and 58% fossil (48% coal and 10% gas) on average.

Cheers,
Mike

mattclary
10-08-2008, 06:43 AM
We do here in Australia - all energy for our house comes from wind power.

What do you do when the wind isn't blowing so much?

kopperdrake
10-09-2008, 04:27 PM
We've got a few options here:

http://www.good-energy.co.uk made from wind, wave and sun only

and

http://www.greenenergy.co.uk - wind, biomass and CHP

and

http://www.ecotricity.co.uk - a windpark company.

The last lot will match your money on bills towards building more wind turbines. Canny as they're a turbine developer/installer but if it works then who can knock it.

I think it may be the good-energy guys who will actually *pay* you for your generation, even though you use it all yourself! Check out http://www.good-energy.co.uk/gyo_offgrid_gen - stunning. Can't be many that do it, but it all helps :)

We're currently converting to an efficient clean burn wood stoves, no other option out here other than our current oil system. Another fiver years we'll see what's available and then possibly extend the whole house to wood heating for spacial heat and hot water in the winter, possibly thermal solar heating for hot water in the summer (still seeing how well that works over here) and a green energy provider for the electric.

kopperdrake
10-09-2008, 04:32 PM
Oh - as a comparison to Mike's we have a massive 73% fossil fuel useage (40% gas and 33% coal - probably a legacy of the North Sea gas fields), 19% Nuclear (though that looks like changing), 1% Oil, 1% Hydro, 2.5% imported and 3.5% from wind,biomass and landfill gas).

Pretty pathetic really considering we're a massive windy island.

Stunt Pixels
10-09-2008, 04:57 PM
We've got a few options here:


Ahh, merry old England. Reminds me of an ex's father (Leslie). He set up a house down in Cornwall and used a waterwheel in his creek to generate all the electricity he needed (in the 60s). Because he was generating surplus he gave the extra to his neighbors. The electricity board (or whatever it's called) took him to court claiming it was illegal to supply others. Turn out Leslie won the case - because he was giving, not selling, it was all legal. I think it's now all sorted so you can sell surplus electricity to the board...

Oh, and in the interest of full disclosure, in Australia for electricity generation:
Black Coal: 54.5%
Brown Coal: 21.9%
Gas: 14.2%
Hydro: 6.8%
Oil: 1.3%
Other (includes wind, solar, and goethermal): 1%

That makes sense. It's why the green electricity is not available to sign up right away. There's a shortage of infrastructure.

calilifestyle
10-09-2008, 06:59 PM
http://www.avinc.com/cleanenergy.asp

JonW
10-19-2008, 10:23 PM
I'm on 100% green electricity and the surcharge from my supplier is a flat au$0.63 a day inc. gst (tax) for putting into the grid the same number of Kilowatts as I used. That's only au$230.00 extra a year for the 100% green part.

The car is still using petrol, I have no garage so at this point in time plugging in a car would be challenging.

Stunt Pixels
10-19-2008, 10:42 PM
I'm on 100% green electricity and the surcharge from my supplier is a flat au$0.63 a day inc. gst (tax) for putting into the grid the same number of Kilowatts as I used. That's only au$230.00 extra a year for the 100% green part.

The car is still using petrol, I have no garage so at this point in time plugging in a car would be challenging.

Ahhh, had me confused there. I was thinking you were paying a flat rate for your energy, not just the green surcharge... I'm with Origin, and it's 5.5c per kWh, or about 61c per day for the amount we use. So yeah, about the same as 2 coffees a week.

As to a car... Mine isn't very green, and all the hippies sneer at me when I drive past. But I only use it for camping, so only end up putting in about 8 tanks a year. Take that hippies!