PDA

View Full Version : Object selection mode in modeler???



Chrizto
10-02-2008, 08:50 AM
Maybe I'm partially blind, or just plain stupid (not the first time), but how can I select whole objects, eg. a ball object by clicking on it in modeler?

I can only choose in component mode... :help:

Iain
10-02-2008, 09:00 AM
In modeler, a ball stops being a ball when you drop the ball tool.

After that it's just a collection of polygons welded together.

BeeVee
10-02-2008, 09:24 AM
There are plenty of ways of selecting a whole discrete object:

* Select one poly on your chosen object and hit ] (Select Connected)
* If you have given your object a surface different to other objects on the layer, you can use the Statistics window (w) to select by surface name
* If you set your falloff in the Move Tool to be Point Radial and you set the distance to something massive (like 10 Mm), then click on an individual object's points and moving the mouse will move the whole object.

B

Chrizto
10-02-2008, 09:30 AM
Hmmm... Thanks for the info, but that raises a question for me:

What if I want to go back and edit the properties, like divisions, etc at a later time? Are there no construction history for the created objects??

Other apps I've used, all have a way of going back and edit properties after initial creation... I can't imagine modeling without having an editable history!

cagey5
10-02-2008, 09:35 AM
That's ok, there's no need to imagine it. It's in front of you and it's called Modeller..

Joking aside, I've never modelled any other way so I don't see it as a hinderence. And there are multiple undoes but I know that's not the same thing.

Iain
10-02-2008, 09:39 AM
Yep no construction history.

You either love modeler or hate it :)

zardoz
10-02-2008, 09:40 AM
hmm I guess you come from max or something like it...well Lightwave's modeler is like what you call in max 'Poly Modelling'...so...hmmm...there's no history/modifier stack.

Iain
10-02-2008, 09:50 AM
You start to work a whole different way when you get used to it.

I modelled a robot head today and just before I started cutting out the mouth, I copied and pasted the head to another layer in case things went horribly wrong as sometimes Undo removes the useful stuff you did in between the abortive stuff.

JeffrySG
10-02-2008, 09:53 AM
Hmmm... Thanks for the info, but that raises a question for me:

What if I want to go back and edit the properties, like divisions, etc at a later time? Are there no construction history for the created objects??
Other apps I've used, all have a way of going back and edit properties after initial creation... I can't imagine modeling without having an editable history!
I had the same exact question when I started using LW. (about the object mode no so much about the modifier stacks) You do get used to it but I still yearn for an object mode. I haven't used modifier stacks so I don't really miss them although they do sound pretty cool. The workflow of LW can be very different but don't put that off as necessarily being worse. Just different. Hitting the "]" key becomes second nature pretty quickly.



Yep no construction history.
You either love modeler or hate it :)
Ain't that the truth! :D

Chrizto
10-02-2008, 10:07 AM
Allright! Now that was a surprise... :bangwall:
Well. I've invested in a license, a fat ugly book, and bought modeling DVD's from Kurv Studios, so there is no turning back now!!!

Guess that will be a big plugin project for me, once I learn the C API... :rolleyes:

Guess I'll get used to it.

Thanks for your replies guys!

iconoclasty
10-02-2008, 10:39 AM
I switched from Max too and the lack of modifier stack takes some adjustment, but I really doubt you'll miss it. I eventually realized how much cleaner and more solid the mesh is when it's just a mesh. The last time I used Max you had to collapse the modifier stack as soon as you actually wanted to do actual modeling anyway so it doesn't seem like much of a loss.

You'll learn to use tools like bandsaw and bandglue instead of going back and adding more segments in the modifier. Some things are just done a little differently.

hrgiger
10-02-2008, 11:09 AM
There are advantages and drawbacks to having a history stack. And while I would say there are more drawbacks overall, there is something to be said for the simplified way of working without a stack. I think if you work in Lightwave long enough, you'll not feel the need for it. I like having it in XSI but it's just a completely different way of working.

Surrealist.
10-02-2008, 03:10 PM
Also regarding moving an object around there is a tool called Snap Drag. You can pull a mesh around by grabbing a point and you can set it to pull the point, the connected points, or all points. Primarily useful for dragging the mesh by the point and snapping that point to another point in a FG layer.

hrgiger
10-02-2008, 03:41 PM
And while I would say there are more drawbacks overall,

I just re-read this, I meant to imply that there are more drawbacks to NOT having a history stack.

Mat
10-02-2008, 06:54 PM
If you have the individual objects in different layers you can just use the move tool.

MooseDog
10-02-2008, 08:32 PM
...how can I select whole objects...

in newtek's world, when nothing is selected, everything is selected :confused:

hit the tab key and the entire model turns into a subdivision surface. try it and see.

i agree with the sentiment that you'll come to appreciate the solidity of a lightwave mesh.

when you get past the beginning steps, check this guy out. really shows off the potential of modeler's different way:

Taron at Gnomon (http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/dvds/tba01.html)

have you looked through the free vids on the newtek site? excellent learning material there to get you up and running.

best o'luck:thumbsup:

GraphXs
10-02-2008, 10:12 PM
The best way to get used to your object having a "history" is using the layers in the upper right hand coner of the screen. If I'm working with splines, poly, etc, I always have my steps in each layer. When I'm near final I will copy the model into a new file and the mesh is ready to go. Think of it more like Photoshop layers. Whats great about them is you can see your "history" in each layer and get back to parts of them quickly.

Surrealist.
10-02-2008, 10:43 PM
Yep. That is the work flow.

I think a history stack is interesting in that it looks to my like it is dynamic and that is entirely different and I can see that as useful because even with layers, you have to go back with a history stack you are not going back but rather accessing the earlier attributes of the model without losing what you have presently modified. With Layers, you lose that.

Hrgiger is that correct?

zardoz
10-03-2008, 03:55 AM
well, let me add my two cents to this. I work in a place with around 15 people (in the 3d department). Everybody else uses max, I'm the only one using lightwave there and despite having the modifier stack what they do most is what they call 'poly modeling' - what we've been doing since ever. So I guess you won't be behind if you model in lightwave.

meshpig
10-03-2008, 04:30 AM
Do it right first up is the idea, trainer wheels end up getting caught in the cracks.

m

Chrizto
10-03-2008, 05:49 AM
Thanks for all the insights. I've just gotten a refund on my LW license, so I'm jumping to Maya... KIDDING! :neener:

I've settled my thoughts on the layer working paradigm. I concluded it to be an interesting twist to working with node based history networks as the once found in Houdini. It gets severely less complicated, so as I am a novice, this will probably be a productive gain, not a hindrance...

:thumbsup: