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Valter
08-01-2003, 12:49 PM
Hi all

I'm curious about your main techinque to modeling using LW.
I know that many peoples here that using many techniques, but I would like have know what's your main technique using LW.

cheers

jb_gfx
08-01-2003, 12:56 PM
I only add primitives :)

Celshader
08-01-2003, 01:08 PM
Originally posted by Valter
...I would like have know what's your main technique using LW.

My modeling philosophy: always use the fastest tool that gives you the highest quality results.

To model a hand: start with a segmented box and bevel out the fingers; hit the Tab key and finish it with subD's.

To model a head: rough it out with splines; hit the Tab key and finish it with subD's.

To model the scroll of a violin: take a two-point polygon and extrude it into a spiral shape with the Seashell tool; get rid of the extra polygons by typing Shift-i to Unify redundant polys into single polys; delete any two-point polys; Extrude the results; select the Extruded spiral half and use a Stretch of -100 to flip it into a mirror of the original spiral; hit the Tab key and finish it with subD's and BandSaw. :D

Valter
08-01-2003, 01:18 PM
Originally posted by Celshader

To model the scroll of a violin: take a two-point polygon and extrude it into a spiral shape with the Seashell tool; get rid of the extra polygons by typing Shift-i to Unify redundant polys into single polys; delete any two-point polys; Extrude the results; select the Extruded spiral half and use a Stretch of -100 to flip it into a mirror of the original spiral; hit the Tab key and finish it with subD's and BandSaw. :D

jesus christ !!! It's very crazy way, I can't imagine it. :)

Celshader
08-01-2003, 01:31 PM
Originally posted by Valter
jesus christ !!! It's very crazy way, I can't imagine it. :)

Heh. I spent five hours trying alternative methods of modeling a violin scroll in LightWave 5.6 before coming up with that one. What I needed was a mechanically perfect way of describing a raised spiral ribbon with an ever-shrinking width. When I realized that a plug-in could do this, I started sifting through Modeler to see what I could find. Lo and behold -- the Seashell tool! After I found that, I modeled the scroll in five minutes! Plus, because the computer had shaped the scroll for me, it had a mechanically perfect spiral.

Now, whenever I find myself stuck trying to do something that a computer could do, I first check to see if someone hasn't already coded a plug-in to solve my specific problem. I firmly believe in the power of using the fastest tool that gives me the highest quality results! :D

Valter
08-01-2003, 01:41 PM
Originally posted by Celshader
Heh. I spent five hours trying alternative methods of modeling a violin scroll in LightWave 5.6 before coming up with that one. What I needed was a mechanically perfect way of describing a raised spiral ribbon with an ever-shrinking width. When I realized that a plug-in could do this, I started sifting through Modeler to see what I could find. Lo and behold -- the Seashell tool! After I found that, I modeled the scroll in five minutes! Plus, because the computer had shaped the scroll for me, it had a mechanically perfect spiral.

Now, whenever I find myself stuck trying to do something that a computer could do, I first check to see if someone hasn't already coded a plug-in to solve my specific problem. I firmly believe in the power of using the fastest tool that gives me the highest quality results! :D

I'll appreciate if you show us some images about it. sound very interresting.

cheers

lone
08-02-2003, 09:36 AM
stecilling works pretty well for me; making a cookie-cutter like shape, and using that to cut into an object.

omeone
08-02-2003, 12:32 PM
Originally posted by Celshader
To model the scroll of a violin: take a two-point polygon and extrude it into a spiral shape with the Seashell tool; get rid of the extra polygons by typing Shift-i to Unify redundant polys into single polys; delete any two-point polys; Extrude the results; select the Extruded spiral half and use a Stretch of -100 to flip it into a mirror of the original spiral; hit the Tab key and finish it with subD's and BandSaw. :D


Wow, nice tip Celshader! hmmm which reminds me - must got check that bonus tutorial of yours...

Any more books on the way??

allaboutkeys
08-02-2003, 01:05 PM
Originally posted by Celshader
select the Extruded spiral half and use a Stretch of -100 to flip it into a mirror of the original spiral

:confused: Newbie here... Would you mind explaining this step in a little more detail? Thanks in advance!

riki
08-02-2003, 09:04 PM
I've got some tips on working with the Sea Shell Tool see http://www.suture.net/tutorials/modeling/page04.shtml

It even works with text.


In the list of modeling methods I would have written 'The detail out method' and included the ''Two Point Poly chain' method.

omeone
08-03-2003, 04:40 AM
Hey Riki, you must be updating those pages all the time?

They were a bit of bible for me when I started out first, but I dont remember that one.... maybe it's time I took a refresher course... I was very tempted to dl the whole lot at one point ;)

Great tutes, very clear and concise, thanks!

Valter
08-03-2003, 10:38 AM
9 votes for other techniques?!?!?!

what's kind techniques are you using?? I really would like have know about this "other techniques".

I don't know you guys but I think that LW could be better for volume modeling. I think that lw is very nice modeling for extend technique. What are you think?

cheers

Soreal
08-03-2003, 04:34 PM
I primarily use spline patching for modelling. I find it easier to use splines because I can see what I have so far and I can quickly explore other options of design without having to go through a multitude of steps to do it. I find that splines can also be VERY versatile and can make ust about anything if used properly.

riki
08-03-2003, 06:17 PM
Thanks omeone, yeah I keep updating them. There's a few things I still haven't coverred yet.


Maybe when I'm finished I'll create a zip archive.

rnb2
08-03-2003, 09:47 PM
Right now, Zbrush for anything organic, and will soon be using SketchUp for anything architectural/mechanical. I like tools that get out of the way as much as possible.

sire
08-04-2003, 12:49 AM
Originally posted by allaboutkeys
:confused: Newbie here... Would you mind explaining this step in a little more detail? Thanks in advance!

Well, this is very simple. A way to mirror stuff without using the mirror tool (which I would prefer). Just use the stretch tool and type in -100 percent on the appropriate axis in the numeric window.

sire
08-04-2003, 12:54 AM
Originally posted by Soreal
I find it easier to use splines because I can see what I have so far and I can quickly explore other options of design without having to go through a multitude of steps to do it. I find that splines can also be VERY versatile and can make ust about anything if used properly.

Strange. I feel totally different. Splines I don't like just BECAUSE I always have to go to a multitude (well, some) steps to see the result, opposed to metanurbs mode, where I can always see a shaded object instead of only some curves.

Of course for certain tasks classic spline patching works better, however, I very rarely use it.

BTW, I also would choose "Other Technique" on the poll, although this still is not exactly right. I mean, it just depends on the modeling task. Every approach has its uses.

Maimo
08-04-2003, 05:36 PM
Im a big fan of Beveling and Sub-D (all bow down before the might TAB key),

Im also a fan of extender and the other Extender like plugins.
David Ikeda's Rocks. It just such and intutive way to streth a mesh into a shape.

Rich
08-05-2003, 04:41 PM
Wow Celshader, thanks for the unify tip. All this time i've wondered how to fix the problem with having multiple polys on a single surface and this tool fixes it for you! I will definitly be using this tool in the future. Thanks again!:)

Baloney Pony
08-05-2003, 04:48 PM
I use what ever it takes.

I approach each problem as a new and unique situation, yet I refer to my previous tasks to more forward.

robewil
08-05-2003, 04:52 PM
Where is "Just click and click and click every button and pray you end up with something cool." :p

meshmaster
08-06-2003, 11:43 AM
so I usually end up grabbing a bunch of points in a row, point extending them, move them out from the originals, delete back row, weld what needs welding, move more, etc.

I learned this technique from Inside LW6. Here's a great tip that I've learned when using this type of modelling - change the quick key for extend to insert and the weld to home. That way, delete, weld, and extend are all right there together. Also... when doing this sort of thing, it helps to jump from point edit to poly edit a lot so you grab your points, move em around, jump to poly edit, delete back poly, jump back into point edit where your selection is still active and off you go. I wish there was a plugin or something that let you do this sort of thing without that back poly showing up, but I haven't found it yet.

Doing this sort of thing, it's also helpful to have the w key pushed before you start so with one quick push of a mouse button on the minus sign, you instantly deselect everthing.