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DefcomDMC
09-10-2008, 09:17 AM
I've been using VT, Toaster, for years but I'm running into some problems that I haven't been able to figure out yet. Maybe there's some part of "the basics" that I'm missing.

What settings should I render to for the best quality? 90% of what we do is outputted on DVD for broadcast using Ulead DVD WS through TMPEG, the rest is .mov for FTP. I usually render using the SpeedHQ codec with project settings. Should I just be dragging the VTP into TMPEG?

I have a project I've been working on that looks SHARP on my VT-Out NTSC monitor, but when I render it down to one file there is aliasing all over my text. I make my text in Photoshop using the NTSC DV setting. I also, pretty much, use whatever color I want. Should I be using a color management filter? I save the files out as PSDs and drag them straight into VT. Often times when I animate the text, let's say size up from 90-100%, my text starts to "flicker". Am I doing it wrong? How so? What should I be doing? What are you doing?

My current project is shot on a DVx100 at 30p. Most of the project is 30p, with some 30i thrown in here and there. Could this be causing some problems? My current plan is to shoot everything 30p. Is that a bad plan?

billmi
09-10-2008, 11:56 AM
Any chance there are saturated reds either in the text or the background? I've had aliasing issues with strong reds in every MPEG encoder I've ever used.

DefcomDMC
09-10-2008, 12:32 PM
Not Really. In this case, all my text was the standard PS white, but maybe that's too white.

SBowie
09-11-2008, 05:31 AM
Apart from the issue of legal colour, you're going to see an obvious difference in the motion of animated text which is being interpolated at only 30 moves per second (progressive) versus 60 (interlaced). The difference can be seen in video too, but is often more readily accepted (in part because of motion blur). You might consider using some sort of blur or motion blur to soften crisp text a smidge, see if that makes it less noticeable.