PDA

View Full Version : Back off the realism, it's too much.



shrox
09-08-2008, 06:28 PM
In the last couple months, three clients have asked to "back off the realism", they all involve a view of the Earth in space, one was showing money flowing in an arc across the United States, the others were showing a globe unfolding into a map. The result is fine for what it is, 7 or so seconds on a local banking commercial, and the idea is neat, but I don't want to put the aired version on my reel. I have the better version still.

What is your thoughts on the ethics of showing something that is better (therefore different) than what was aired?

Whelkn
09-08-2008, 06:50 PM
I say its your reel put whatever you want on it. I have done the same thing on many shots on my reel. Especially when you get to many cooks in the kitchen noodling with stuff. Your selling your self now put your best foot forward.

Jeremy

jameswillmott
09-08-2008, 06:55 PM
I agree, I have plenty of stuff on my reel which was 'blah' under client direction, which I improved after delivery for my own marketing...

I don't think there is an ethical dilemma at all.

shrox
09-08-2008, 07:23 PM
Cool, I don't fret about it or anything.

SplineGod
09-08-2008, 08:20 PM
Definately show whichever is better. :)

rakker16mm
09-08-2008, 09:26 PM
The reel is about what you can do. Not what the client wanted you to do. Show your work to your best advantage. Besides if you show the blah stuff that is the kind of client you are advertising yourself towards.

RollerJesus
09-08-2008, 09:41 PM
I agree in the sense that you should put your best foot forward, but if you are using their likeness for your gain (which a reel is intended to do), then it should be approved by them.

If you put it in a contract that the clients stuff can be used for marketing, no problem at all, but I wouldn't be certain you won't be getting a cease and desist if the client doesn't approve.

Is pulling out their info possible?

rakker16mm
09-08-2008, 09:59 PM
I think the chances of receiving a C&D over a reel are practically nil. Considering reels tend to be targeted toward potential clients on a very small scale anyway, there isn't much motivation on the part of the original client to take the legal route. Besides if you receive a C&D, you just C&D.

brian.coates
09-08-2008, 11:20 PM
The reel is about what you can do. Not what the client wanted you to do.
Exactly.

BigHache
09-08-2008, 11:57 PM
You could also put terms in the contract specifying your rights to use the contracted works for self-promotion. Then you can't get a C&D.

zardoz
09-09-2008, 03:26 AM
in this thread I have some of our works
http://www.newtek.com/forums/showthread.php?t=84053
and the oil rigs image in particular wasn't the one we gave the client...their render was completely 'blue' with a clear sky...well after finishing this ad I decided to change the render a bit...even in our site this is the image we have and not the one the client choose. So if you want to show what you are able to do just give the credits for the concept to who did it and say what you did with the image and that what you are showing is your 'vision' of someone else's idea.

Digital Hermit
09-09-2008, 08:24 AM
The best advice I ever had was from a game artist who once worked at Origin... When presenting your portfolio or demo reel always put forth your best work and never put anything mediocre... because despite your best works presented, you can bet it will be the mediocre work they will be looking at.

CC Rider
09-09-2008, 09:52 AM
Show the best work for sure...might be an opportunity to add an interesting shot to the reel. If the before and after have the same camera moves and match each other apart from the quality, you could do a transition from the client version to the better version. Maybe show how you can turn an okay visual into a work of art with that one shot....

:D:devil:

shrox
09-09-2008, 10:22 AM
I know about showing my best work, I just wonder what a client might think when the see a different version on my demo than was on the air.

CC Rider
09-09-2008, 10:35 AM
I know about showing my best work, I just wonder what a client might think when the see a different version on my demo than was on the air.

good point...
I would think if the scene is drastically different, your client is likely to see the new reel and notice, and it is a good client with future work possibilities...a phone call or "heads up" couldn't hurt. The client may be impressed in this day of the "ethically challenged" work environment. May be a good way for your name to stick with the client if there is competition for projects in the future.
Any excuse to contact the client and chat it up without looking like you are begging for work and come out looking like a standup guy/gal has to be a good thing! Networking is extremely important to a freelancer! Could be a good opportunity!

:D

rakker16mm
09-09-2008, 10:42 AM
Shrox,

Is the old client likely to see your reel? Putting together a reel out of previous work is common practice. It's hard to imagine they would be upset, unless you were doing something to make them look bad.

shrox
09-09-2008, 11:21 AM
This is a very small town but we have the highest media saturation in the country, about 50,000 in the area with seven TV stations and almost three dozen radio stations. People can get kind of wierd here about media and advertising. The company I am doing stuff for now got blasted by the competition because of a commercial that said "we don't do low quality local ads", they felt insulted. Not my fault they do crappy ads and we don't.

RollerJesus
09-09-2008, 11:29 AM
I know about showing my best work, I just wonder what a client might think when the see a different version on my demo than was on the air.

Sounds to me like you know what is right in the situation.

I am helping build a portfolio for another designer and we are going through this very issue. We called the publisher to ask about using some ads that they rejected and they were appalled.

Their response: "Why would you use something that shows my company in a way that I decided I didn't want it to be shown?"

JBT27
09-09-2008, 02:39 PM
What about reels that are completely personal stuff, as good as you can do, projects that show off the kind of stuff you want to do, and are good at, and considerably more sophisticated than alot of the stuff you are asked to do?

Just 'flying kites' here.....but does that not get around this issue?

Because otherwise the demo is more about who you've worked for rather than how good you are. That has a load of merit for sure, but I just wonder if a demo is better as client-relevant but personal work that is your best, and offends no-one.

Julian.

Andyjaggy
09-09-2008, 02:59 PM
I would say go for it. It's not like you are showing your demo reel on TV or anything, most likely it's going to be a select group of people you send it to, and they aren't looking at it to buy a product but to see if they want to hire you.

shrox
09-09-2008, 02:59 PM
I think showing client work shows you are bankable, a proven performer, and commands more money.

shrox
09-09-2008, 03:06 PM
I would say go for it. It's not like you are showing your demo reel on TV or anything, most likely it's going to be a select group of people you send it to, and they aren't looking at it to buy a product but to see if they want to hire you.

The Eureka area is unique in that there are as many advertising agencies here as there are pony-tailed post-grad students in a Berkley Starbucks. And we have post-grad students at coffeeshops a plenty here, but most of them have dreds. Skinny white guys with Sideshow Bob hair.

Digital Hermit
09-09-2008, 04:21 PM
I know about showing my best work, I just wonder what a client might think when the see a different version on my demo than was on the air.

Well, if your version is better than the aired version (and they noticed the difference) then you would have a good story to tell, wouldn't you. I see no problem in saying the client wanted something different and you obliged... sounds as if you would get "flexible" points to me. :D

zardoz
09-09-2008, 05:57 PM
like I said in my the post before...imagine you have this project whose concept is from someone else. And even the modeling, lighting, rendering, etc was completely directed by someone else...is that your work? would you be able to show that to someone and say 'I did this!' ?

Now, if someone had the concept and you and you don't like the end result (but the client did)? because it has the colors they like, the light come from where they want etc? but you decided it has some potential but you wanted to give it your personal touch. And in the end you think that your version ended much better?
I say show them both versions, and say the truth. "This is what they wanted and this is my version".
If it's on a reel show the one you like most.