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grey_matters
08-04-2008, 12:17 PM
I did a search and couldn't find much info here other than DAVE. Are there any colleges in SoCal that offer programs for animation? I don't care about the software they use, as long as it's a good animation program. I know Cal Arts is supposed to be good, but damn expensive. Anyone have any other suggestions?

RebelHill
08-04-2008, 01:05 PM
The good ones are expensive....

By far the best quality of education per $ atm though is animationmentor.com

Imatk
08-04-2008, 01:52 PM
Gnomon is in California.

They're good. But also expensive.

JVitale
08-04-2008, 02:54 PM
Glendale Community College in Glendale CA, and Los Angeles Mission College in Sylmar, CA...I'm not sure of the quality of either one but they have well equipped labs...It's inexpensive since they are Community Colleges

AdamAvenali
08-04-2008, 03:02 PM
i have been looking into USC for my Masters in Fine Arts for Animation and Digital Arts. i too have just began looking though, so that is all i know haha.

geothefaust
08-04-2008, 03:26 PM
Vancouver Film School in British Columbia, Canada. Expensive, but I hear it is very good.

DAVE, of course.

I'm not sure about Full Sail, personally, but I haven't heard very many good things.

Also, avoid the "Art Institute of (insert city here)". I've heard a lot of bad things about them. Especially where I live.

Your local community college is a great resource, worth looking into.

TheDynamo
08-04-2008, 03:34 PM
We've seen some good kids come out of the "Art Institute of Portland" but I think it speaks well of the individual student, not the school.

-Rob

AdamAvenali
08-04-2008, 03:34 PM
last year i went to one of the Art Institutes near me to look for possible employees to hire and must say i was rather disappointed. i do hear that they do a good job of helping a student find employment, but i would be leery of the program in general, but then again i'm sure they have different strengths from city to city.

beverins
08-05-2008, 11:52 AM
You said SoCal, so Long Island University is rather on the opposite side of the US... but here in Brooklyn we have a good animation degree program.

There's also SVA, NYT which are powerhouses, and Pratt too to some extent. There's also NYIT for real beginners.

grey_matters
08-06-2008, 09:10 AM
You said SoCal, so Long Island University is rather on the opposite side of the US... but here in Brooklyn we have a good animation degree program.

There's also SVA, NYT which are powerhouses, and Pratt too to some extent. There's also NYIT for real beginners.


The NY commute might not work out. My local community college has a few classes, but it looks like they teach software more than animation if that makes sense.

I don't know much about Gnomon - anyone here ever taken classes with them? They are kinda pricey though ...

Imatk
08-06-2008, 01:07 PM
The thing about Gnomon is you will likely be learning from an industry pro.

So what you will learn will be worth it.

BUT if you're the kind of person that can crack a large book, do a lot of tutorials and so on then that's a MUCH cheaper way of going about it.

Although it might take you longer... just depends.

If you have a great demo reel it won't matter where you went to school.. or even if you went at all.

I have a degree in Journalism... go figure :)

geothefaust
08-06-2008, 02:15 PM
We've seen some good kids come out of the "Art Institute of Portland" but I think it speaks well of the individual student, not the school.

-Rob

That's actually pretty encouraging. :) I've just heard so many bad things from students I've known that went there, I decided I wouldn't go that route.

I'm curious, I know it's not LightWave-centric... But does anyone know how Vancouver Film School is? I'm strongly geared toward heading there at the moment.

madjester
08-06-2008, 02:58 PM
I don't want to badmouth the college system (I am a University of the Arts, Philadelphia grad of 2007, FYI and I don't regret it) but I would recommend not going to school. Instead I would take a class or two in drawing, or just go to life drawing get togethers and learn the computer programs on your own.

I graduated and found a job at a studio a few months later using the skills I have taught myself (web design, coding) rather than the skills I was taught at school. The most valuable resource I got from college are the contacts.

College or no however, what you put into your work will be what you get out of it.

Focus on what you want to do and explore the basic skills behind it. Anyone can do Maya, LW or Flash but not everyone can make great animation.

cohominous
08-06-2008, 05:31 PM
I went to Full Sail and I've found much the same experience as others shared here. You get out what you put in. It's even more so with "tech" schools like Full Sail that basically let you in if you have $60k. You'd think that would be enough motivation to buckle down, but sadly it isn't always the case.

I've seen some amazing artist come out of Full Sail that went on to ILM and EA, but they were also the ones putting in extra lab time and asking all the questions in class. Then you have my roommate who was a blast to party with but I heard he recently got fired from his paper route.

grey_matters
08-07-2008, 07:47 AM
Books are good and all, but they don't give you feedback and interaction with like minded and goaled people will alays help you do better quicker. Books don't encourage you to keep going either. Don't get me wrong, I went to college and got a computer geek degree and spent many years as a programmer and most of what I used I learned from books. Sure you can get feedback and encouragement online, but come on, that can't replace face to face time. Like a couple people mentioned, you get out of it what you put in.

I think I'm going try these community college classes, but keep looking for a close program that teaches animation (not software) and has a program length and schedule that'll fit in my life. I can always eBay stuff to help pay for it.

For anyone who has completed the AM or Gnomon programs, please shoot me a message. I'd like to hear your thoughts both pros and cons.

Imatk
08-07-2008, 09:15 AM
You get out of anything what you put in. Whether it's books, classes or anything.

Ultimately you have to do what YOU feel is right for YOU.

When I started they didn't have the DAVE school or Gnomon or anything.

I am completely self-taught. But I was motivated. I knew what I wanted and I went for it and ultimately have done more than I ever expected.

If you have the cash I'm sure Gnomon or another good school will be beneficial.

I'm sure the community college route would be beneficial as well.

AbnRanger
08-09-2008, 05:35 PM
I did a search and couldn't find much info here other than DAVE. Are there any colleges in SoCal that offer programs for animation? I don't care about the software they use, as long as it's a good animation program. I know Cal Arts is supposed to be good, but damn expensive. Anyone have any other suggestions?I just started back (as a transfer student) at the Art Institute of California-Inland Empire (San Bernardino), after researching the schools in the LA area. It's a very thorough program ( B.S. in Media Arts and Animation), top to bottom, and the instructors have extensive industry experience and/or currently work in the industry (commuting all the way from LA to the campus, over 50mi away just to teach). Some of the student work here is pretty darn impressive.
Digital Domain has a list of institutes across the country that usually produce outstanding candidates for them to consider. A.I. is one of them.
With grants and federal aid (NO private student loans...I was adamant aobut that), I was able to handle the tuition...and I wasn't yet eligible for the CalGrant. In your Junior and Senior year you should be eligible for the SMART grant as well, as long as you maintain at least a 3.0 GPA.
Colleges in LA are super expensive (but they also have more grants and institutional awards/aid). It's easier on the pocket book the further you get away from LA :thumbsup: