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Nangleator
06-03-2008, 06:56 PM
Starting a new corporate gig soon and I'm wondering what's an economical video editing add-on.

Is the Toaster a good choice? I bought one years ago at a different corporate job, and I remember loving it, but knowing the system you installed it in had to be pretty damned beefy. Is that still the case?

I'll likely be doing up to 10 minute final videos, mostly with only 2 or 3 video layers.

I've got a DVRex at home, and that's worked okay. It's a DV format, so I may need higher quality. I may need HD capability.

Hopefully I'll be able to specify my computer, but I may end up with an off-the-shelf company model.

At least LW will run okay!

DiscreetFX
06-03-2008, 08:20 PM
VT[5] would be a cool way to go yes. Depending on your needs you might be able to get away with just using SpeedEDIT.

Dexter2999
06-03-2008, 08:28 PM
Are you doing post editing or live switching?
Live Switching is being directed over the to the Tricaster Studio by their marketing staff. But that has no HD. It is fine for corporate stuff and web stuff and it isn't dependent on your hardware.
If you can talk them into a Toaster go for it.
If you are doing post work...SpeedEdit is very economical and powerful. The only thing I can think of that nags at me is the capture device support. I am not positive but I don't know that it supports stuff like the AJA or Black Magic units.

Nangleator
06-03-2008, 08:42 PM
Yes, I won't need live switching. I should have been more specific. I'll take a look at SpeedEdit. I've heard good things about it, now that I see the name again.

Thanks!

Surrealist.
06-03-2008, 08:56 PM
If you are not going to be switching I would also consider Sony Vegas. It is quite a little package and it is very cheap. I have been using it for 8 years. Take a look at their site. It is also a great audio tool in one which is a real plus. You can download a trial and check it out.

iojabba
06-03-2008, 10:47 PM
If you are not going to be switching I would also consider Sony Vegas. It is quite a little package and it is very cheap. I have been using it for 8 years. Take a look at their site. It is also a great audio tool in one which is a real plus. You can download a trial and check it out.

I agree, Sony Vegas is great and super cheap for what you get. I haven't used it for that long but love it so far.

AbnRanger
06-03-2008, 11:32 PM
It's audio pedigree and tools are second to none...and with the DVD Architect included, Vegas is, top to bottom, the most feature-rich desktop editor available outside of Final Cut...and priced really sweet, at $480 or lower.
Hard to go wrong there.

Surrealist.
06-04-2008, 02:50 AM
It's funny. There was a time when people would look at me funny and say you are using what?

It was kind of my own little best-kept secret. But when I first saw the audio interface - Vegas before video - I was very impressed because no one else was even doing this. Maybe Protools had elements but these guys really innovated out of the gate at a great price. So I initially bought it to record and mix audio and it was very sweet. I had done a bit of audio editing before but this was by far the most simple and well thought-out interface I had ever seen. It took getting used to how damn easy it was. That with the rubber band editing of envelopes - in real time. No one was doing that in 2000. By no one I mean competitors like just pick any audio package out there at the time - save pro tools. And yo could use this software with any hardware.

So when the Vegas Video upgrade came out, even though it lacked some workable features, I jumped on it. The idea of having video right on top of this great sounding full feature audio app was too hard to resist. They had the idea way back then that the future was not in hardware based solutions but in taking advantage of the computer speeds and RAM. At the time if you remember most solutions were tied into some kind of hardware and or rendering to look at transitions and effects in real time.

Vegas changed all of that. Everything was "real time". That is, you could see it and you did not have to render. No one else was doing that. You could chose different preview modes depending on your computer speed and complexity of the effect. This sped up work flow tremendously.

Since then I have been happy with the development of the software and I only bring this up because really these guys are a good investment and you can expect them to be ahead of the curve on most things which is nice.

Nangleator
06-04-2008, 07:35 AM
Okay, the DVD mastering is swinging me towards Vegas.

eagleeyed
06-04-2008, 07:52 AM
I am another Vegas supporter. You can honestly not go wrong at all with Sony Vegas. One of the best programs I have ever used, never had a problem with it and the audio tools are second to none. Extremely powerful program and has no trouble what so ever editing HD Video which I do.

DVD Architect is a brilliant program too and makes the job extremely simple. Overall, extremely pleased with this sony product. If you have any questions feel free to PM to me, Skype is also connected to my account, however I also have msn, gmail and on special occasions Yahoo.

Jim_C
06-04-2008, 08:02 AM
They had the idea way back then that the future was not in hardware based solutions but in taking advantage of the computer speeds and RAM. At the time if you remember most solutions were tied into some kind of hardware and or rendering to look at transitions and effects in real time.

Vegas changed all of that. Everything was "real time". That is, you could see it and you did not have to render. No one else was doing that.


Really? No one? ;)

Surrealist.
06-04-2008, 09:02 AM
LOL!

Certainly not an absolute. :D

I knew someone would catch that but I left in anyway. :)

A better way to put it was that generally speaking the current technology and trend was in this direction.

Point is I remember being impressed at what a bold move that was at the time. I talked to the tech guys and asked them what boards they were planning to support and they pretty much said flat out. We don't see that as the future of video editing. And they were right. The way they coded the software was to dynamically take advantage of the computer resources.

And if you look at the changes in Adobe Premiere I forget which version but it was a few years after that. It looked and worked very similar to Vegas.

Now of course they do support boards. But the software in not dependent on them. You can output to SD and HD decks. So it is a flexible software solution that maybe seems the norm now. But these guys were on it ahead of the curve.

And another bold "first" - as a free upgrade. In 2003 they had support for HD. pretty froward thinking again. Which is the entire point.

And of course a nice DVD solution bundled is pretty cool too. :)

CC Rider
06-06-2008, 01:58 PM
I noticed someone had Premiere CS3 for sale on the forums here...
http://www.newtek.com/forums/showthread.php?t=84538

I have used Premiere for years. Never had a need to switch since it always worked for me.
Also comes with Encore DVD for DVD authoring.:D

Nangleator
06-06-2008, 02:23 PM
I'll be buying a new copy.

I know an older version of Premiere, but I love the marketing material on SpeedEdit, and what the other posters have said about Vegas.

I'm leaning towards Vegas because of the bundled authoring app, but I don't need to make complex menus, I don't think. Just something that gives me options and transcodes pretty quickly.

Is the "resolution independent" nature of SpeedEdit something that Vegas can't match? I'll likely be doing high def trade show loops and repurposing them for NTSC DVDs and web clips. I'm also attracted to the quick and simple aspects of SpeedEdit. (I'm trying to budget my limited brain RAM for LightWave.)

CC Rider
06-06-2008, 02:43 PM
If you are planning to buy it new, Encore is actually part of Premiere now, you can download a demo from Adobe if you are interested...but no matter if you have already narrowed your choices down.
Personally, I would choose Vegas between Vegas and SpeedEdit.
I was pretty excited about Speededit and got it as soon as it was released.
I wasn't able to use it. It seemed very clumsy and I just couldn't get it to work they way I thought it should. And the "resolution independent" thing didn't work out for me too well either. I don't remember all the details since it has been a while but I do remember I had to just hang it up and go back to Premiere.
If you don't have any experience as an editor you may not have any issues with SpeedEdit like I did. I already had a workflow and a rhythm etc. and Speededit just didn't work for me. It just seemed that it was software that 3d
artists could use to put a reel together or export an image sequence...which is a great thing. Just not a professional editing solution. I guess there's no reason to learn an entire editing system if your needs are minimal.
I have heard a lot more good things about Vegas than I have SpeedEdit for sure! I have even heard folks who say the prefer Vegas to Premiere as well...I'm just not one of them...
Good luck which ever one you choose!

:D

Nangleator
06-06-2008, 02:48 PM
Thank you, CC Rider. I've used Premiere for years, and will certainly need layering and effects and good titling and audio tools. Sounds like Vegas is the way to go.

AbnRanger
06-06-2008, 05:46 PM
Here's a few links where you can view for free a few intro titles to get an idea what they offer:
Adobe Premiere Pro CS3:
http://movielibrary.lynda.com/html/modPage.asp?ID=369
http://www.vtc.com/products/Adobe-Premiere-Pro-CS3-tutorials.htm
http://www.adobe.com/products/premiere/

Sony Vegas (this one doesn't cover the newest version, 8, but you can get an idea):
http://www.vtc.com/products/Sony-Vegas-7-tutorials.htm
http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/support/trainingvids.asp?prod=vegaspro
http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/vegaspro

Surrealist.
06-06-2008, 08:24 PM
Regarding resolution independent it was just another thing Vegas has been ahead of the curve on. It has been that way since version 1.

Vegas can be as deep as you need it to be, depending on how much you want to get into it.

But for most things it is very intuitive so you should be up and running with edits in a matter or minutes.

Serling
06-06-2008, 11:54 PM
Well, having spent the last 25 years as a news photog and editor, I've always used Avid and do quite well with Media Composer (for the last 12 of those years). But for the price, I don't think you can beat the standard bundle of Adobe CS3: Photoshop, Premiere and After Effects, to name a few. Combined with Lightwave we're talking some serious production capability. If you can swing it, get the Extended version of Photoshop CS3 which includes features specifically for video production.

Yeah, it's a little more expensive than Vegas, but you can author DVDs right from the Premiere timeline and After Effects and Photoshop are worth the price of admission alone. Plus, Premiere is a very user-friendly app: very small learning curve.

Most of the time I use a Media Composer/Combustion workflow and author DVDs using Sorenson Squeeze (for encoding) and Reel DVD for authoring. But every now and then I use Premiere Pro for editing and authoring when I need quick turnaround.

As always, your mileage may very.

Surrealist.
06-07-2008, 08:03 AM
An extra note about Vegas, I was just looking at the site and noticed DVD authoring is integrated into the time line now as well.


Powerful DVD Tools
Burn Blu-ray discs directly from the timeline for high-definition delivery. Create standard DVDs with multiple video angles, subtitles, multiple languages, and running commentary. Apply Brightness and Contrast, Auto Levels, Crop, and Anti-Flicker filters. Set CSS and MacrovisionŽ copy-protection flags for masters. DVD Architect Pro 4.5 software supports the latest devices, including dual-layer DVD burners. More about DVD creation (http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/vegaspro/dvd)

starbase1
06-09-2008, 04:10 AM
What is peoples opinion of the Adobe Premiere Elements package?

I bought the first version and was impressed with the quality of the output, (very visibly better than other stuff I had been using), but found the interface about as friendly as Blender!

Nick

Nangleator
06-09-2008, 08:34 AM
Oh, and one quick question I didn't want to make a new thread for: What's a device called that lets me run video from one source (DVD player or PC) to multiple television displays?

I googled "video switchers" and it seems like I get multiple inputs for one output. Not the same thing.

Thanks!

starbase1
06-09-2008, 08:54 AM
Oh, and one quick question I didn't want to make a new thread for: What's a device called that lets me run video from one source (DVD player or PC) to multiple television displays?

I googled "video switchers" and it seems like I get multiple inputs for one output. Not the same thing.

Thanks!

I'd know it as a video splitter, or signal splitter?

Jim_C
06-09-2008, 09:27 AM
Oh, and one quick question I didn't want to make a new thread for: What's a device called that lets me run video from one source (DVD player or PC) to multiple television displays?

I googled "video switchers" and it seems like I get multiple inputs for one output. Not the same thing.

Thanks!

You want a Video Distribution Amplifier

the VAC Brick is a small well built industrial unit, but it does cost.
Places like Markertek, B&H, even Radio Shack also sell prosumer units like this one:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/441295-REG/Jamo_JAV61_JAV_61_Audio_Video_Distribution_Amplifi er.html