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starbase1
05-16-2008, 05:59 AM
Personally I would rather spend an afternoon trying to bite my own nose off than watch youtube videos, but I have been asked to produce something which is going to used for a youtube video.

Does anyone have any handy pointers on any neat ways of doing this? For example, what codecs should I use to avoid the thing being re-encoded? What resolutions can I use?

If I have an audio file, can LW be persuaded to add it into the video file directly?

Yours cluelessly,
Nick

BeeVee
05-16-2008, 06:28 AM
Hey Nick,

Do a search on here, there is a SpeedEdit guide to making a YouTube video that's really good. Tells you the optimum size to use and so on.

B

Digital Hermit
05-17-2008, 01:42 AM
Here is what I know.

For quality sake, if you can save it as a 320x240 flash "FLV" file... YT seems to like those the best. If not, then next best format would be a QuickTime file.

Hope this helps.

Matt
05-17-2008, 02:24 AM
Your avatar never fails to make me laugh Hermit! :D

starbase1
05-17-2008, 07:47 AM
Here is what I know.

For quality sake, if you can save it as a 320x240 flash "FLV" file... YT seems to like those the best. If not, then next best format would be a QuickTime file.

Hope this helps.

Any nice simple cheap or free tools around to convert to flash?
Nick

Jim_C
05-17-2008, 09:45 AM
YouTube is going to re-encode it no matter what file you give it. Regardless if it is flash. wmv. avi. mpeg4 etc, they will re-encode it.

So the best procedure is to make the best looking file just under 100mb(YouTube limit) you can get with whatever codec you choose.(That youtube accepts) I use mpeg4 straight from SpeedEdit. No matter the length I adjust the bitrate to hit just under 100mb so they are always getting the best quality I can give them.
Unless of course it's just a couple seconds, then I usually max out at 1500-1800.

Also most of the time YouTube will do a better job of scaling if you give it a 640x480 file, although I found this to not always be the case. So make one at 640x480 and one at 320x240 give them both to youtube and see which comes out better.

This knowledge comes from uploading over 500 clips to youtube over the last few months.

Jim_C
05-17-2008, 09:48 AM
Do a search on here, there is a SpeedEdit guide to making a YouTube video that's really good. Tells you the optimum size to use and so on.

http://www.newtek.com/forums/showthread.php?t=77133

Jim_C
05-17-2008, 10:13 AM
Also, YT does have a batch uploading app that if used, your file can be up to a gig in size, although still only 10mins max. Thr problem I had with it is I don't think you have as much control over the details and info of each clip while uploading.

You have to wait till it is uploaded, then access the video thru the control panel and add your info there.

This is why I use mpeg4... (It's a blurb from the link below)
>>If you don't think your current video file format is recognized by YouTube, you may get the best results from converting your file to MPEG4 video with MP3 audio.<<

http://help.youtube.com/support/youtube/bin/answer.py?answer=55744&topic=10526

We-Co
05-17-2008, 01:37 PM
You can also upload your video at any size, but your have to make it longer to preserve high quality.

Red_Oddity
05-17-2008, 05:02 PM
You can use MEncode or FFMpeg (or VirtualDub if you want to avoid typing command lines) to convert it to a 320x240 Quicktime animation file (depending on the length of the movie you want to post, it should give the best results, as your uploading a lossless encoded file)

starbase1
05-18-2008, 03:48 AM
Thanks Jim, there's some excellent info in there!
:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:


YouTube is going to re-encode it no matter what file you give it. Regardless if it is flash. wmv. avi. mpeg4 etc, they will re-encode it.

So the best procedure is to make the best looking file just under 100mb(YouTube limit) you can get with whatever codec you choose.(That youtube accepts) I use mpeg4 straight from SpeedEdit. No matter the length I adjust the bitrate to hit just under 100mb so they are always getting the best quality I can give them.
Unless of course it's just a couple seconds, then I usually max out at 1500-1800.

Also most of the time YouTube will do a better job of scaling if you give it a 640x480 file, although I found this to not always be the case. So make one at 640x480 and one at 320x240 give them both to youtube and see which comes out better.

This knowledge comes from uploading over 500 clips to youtube over the last few months.