PDA

View Full Version : What Can LightWave Do That Poser Cannot?



i2dontknow84
05-14-2008, 09:17 PM
Hi,

I am considering purchasing Lightwave 3D... I already own Poser 7 and I am wondering if spending the additional money for another 3D software app would be worth it. So my primary question is:

What specifically can Lightwave 3D do that Poser cannot do?

I mean if I were to learn and use every tool and script in Poser, what is there in addition to all that - that Lightwave can do that would make buying and learning Lightwave worthwhile?

Any info will be much appreciated.

Thanks,

i2dontknow84

maximus210
05-14-2008, 09:56 PM
Lightwave is a very powerful program it has a very detailed modeling section as well a being able to produce detailed renders just to name a few.
I have both and I find Poser good for more basic people renderings and it was quick to learn LW is a complex program that I still have not mastered even after 3 years.
But you will need both for the world of CGI.
Hope I have helped a bit

AbnRanger
05-14-2008, 10:58 PM
Hi,

I am considering purchasing Lightwave 3D... I already own Poser 7 and I am wondering if spending the additional money for another 3D software app would be worth it. So my primary question is:

What specifically can Lightwave 3D do that Poser cannot do?

I mean if I were to learn and use every tool and script in Poser, what is there in addition to all that - that Lightwave can do that would make buying and learning Lightwave worthwhile?

Any info will be much appreciated.

Thanks,

i2dontknow84Poser is a rubber raft and Lightwave is a yacht in comparison...if that's straighforward enough.

geothefaust
05-15-2008, 12:32 AM
Poser is a different kind of 3D application. Comparing it with Lightwave (or any other modeling or sculpting application), isn't something I would do.

Are you familiar with modeling in 3D? You should give the demo a shot.

To put it simply (not as simply as abnranger put it) you can do anything in Lightwave, create anything you can imagine. Poser is just that, a tool for posing your characters and rendering them in your scene.

Speedmonk42
05-15-2008, 12:56 AM
If you have the patience to do ANYTHING with poser, I can't imagine what you might be able to do with LW.

Probably anything you want.

In poser can you set your model on fire, then have it explode into pieces bouncing off other objects?

tonybliss
05-15-2008, 02:10 AM
Everything !!!

Surrealist.
05-15-2008, 02:44 AM
Hi,

I am considering purchasing Lightwave 3D... I already own Poser 7 and I am wondering if spending the additional money for another 3D software app would be worth it. So my primary question is:

What specifically can Lightwave 3D do that Poser cannot do?

I mean if I were to learn and use every tool and script in Poser, what is there in addition to all that - that Lightwave can do that would make buying and learning Lightwave worthwhile?

Any info will be much appreciated.

Thanks,

i2dontknow84

I have never used Poser but have known about it since it was introduced. It has grown up since then. So what would you be able to do if you learned every tool and script in poser?

And secondly, what is it you want to accomplish with 3D? Would you be able to do that with Poser?

Verlon
05-15-2008, 09:36 PM
Poser is a very specific application. If you want to do stuff LIKE Poser's realm, then compare Poser to Layout (the program you use to set up animations and render them). Layout is about 1/2 of the basic Lightwave box. Let's start there....

Lightwave has a much better renderer. It is more versatile, faster, more stable. The surfacing system is better. The entire interface is faster. The character tools are...harder to learn. I beleive they are more powerful, but I am simply not good enough with them to state that as an absolute fact yet.

Now, Lightwave also includes Modeler. This allows you to make objects. I am not talking simple cube and spheres or deformed props. Modeler is the 'strong' part of Lightwave, and many people who use other applications still choose to do their modeling in Lightwave. You can make just about anything you ever saw in CG (whether you knew it was CG or not) in Lightwave. This would include other characters, props, and the like for your Poser scenes. In fact, a larger percentage of the online community, including DAZ3D, use Lightwave in the creation of their content (to be fair, they also use other applications, and now that they own Carera, they might be headed in that direction).

Now I am not saying you could push a button and create Victoria 5. Like many 'more powerful' tools, it is also 'more complicated.' It will take a bit of hard work to get good. You'll certainly learn to respect those artists making content.

If you JUST want to animate pre-made characters, and maybe tweak them a little bit, Poser is pretty good for that. If you just want to visualize something that the substantial Poser library can accomplish, you're fine. However, if you're looking for 3D software, you're probably looking for something you can't find in/for Poser. This IS what Lightwave does....but it won't be nearly as easy.

i2dontknow84
05-16-2008, 12:36 AM
Hi,

Wow, thanks so much for all of the input. You folks are great. I am getting quite enthusiastic about learning and using Lightwave 3D now. I gotta get it now.

I think first I will get some DVDs and at least one book on Lightwave, then down the road when I have enough extra quarters in my Piggy Bank, I'll get it :-)

I'm one who makes decisions quickly, so I think my mind is made up. I had a feeling there was quite a bit more to Lightwave than Poser...

Thanks again for the info.

Hope to chat with you folks again in the near future.

i2dontknow84

doimus
05-16-2008, 12:56 AM
Hi,

What specifically can Lightwave 3D do that Poser cannot do?



Everything else.:thumbsup:

hrgiger
05-16-2008, 04:12 AM
Um, Lightwave can make models that don't look like mannequins.

doimus
05-16-2008, 05:02 AM
Mine can't. Mine can't even model manequins. But maybe it's just me.

BeeVee
05-16-2008, 06:26 AM
And don't forget you can download a Trial Edition and get a taste here: http://www.newtek.com/lightwave/lwtrial/

B

Tony_R_B
05-16-2008, 09:31 AM
Well as a long term poser/vue user who has just bought LW it goes like this.

In Poser you fiddle around with the products of someone else's imagination.

In LW you use your own imagination to build - anything, texture it, light it (properly) and animate it.

You are comparing chalk and cheese to a large extent, but anything you see in poser you could make in LW.

Speedmonk42
05-16-2008, 09:55 PM
Mine can't. Mine can't even model manequins. But maybe it's just me.

I thought that was just my problem.

Mine look like boxes.

i2dontknow84
05-16-2008, 11:21 PM
Thanks again...

Just ordered the training DVDs.

As soon as I finish them I will be downloading the trial version

One more question if I may... once you learn Lightwave 3D, how long does it usually take to create a (not too advanced) typical figure in Lightwave?

i2dontknow84

Sarford
05-17-2008, 06:04 AM
You don't have to learn all of lightwave to be able to use it. It is a very versatile program that caters to more then one group of users.

It doesn't take too long to model a figure in lightwave, the level of advancement of characters is more in the rigging then in the modeling though. Be sure to watch your polygon flow when modeling characters.

One of the best books on lightwave (in my opinion) is Inside Lightwave by Dan Ablan. Pick up a copy if you can, it more or less tackles the whole program.

IMI
05-17-2008, 06:07 PM
Well... if you had been part of the "Poser thread"... what was it... six to nine months ago.... you would have seen excellent examples provided by Mr. Rid that shows that Poser can help to create some incredible-looking characters THAT DO NOT look like mannequins. ONCE AGAIN.... it all depends upon the artist using the software. How many people here would dispute that? Terrence Walker has used Poser.

Blanket statements like this above are not true and do not help at all.

Not to beat a dead horse or anything, and I don't really mean this to be anti-Poser, but Poser does have one major design flaw which would prevent most people from being able to make exceptional renders. It has some sort of limit on how much detail you can get into a model with textures.
You can make a 2K image map and use a one pixel brush to paint a bump map, then up that to 4K and still use your one pixel brush, but you won't see any more detail than you did with the 2K map, in spite of the fact the actual painted detail would be finer and should render with finer detail as well. I'm not saying 2K is the limit - that's just arbitrary, but what is true is after a certain resolution, upping it makes no difference in the result.
And of course, not just bump but textures, spec, reflect/refract and normal maps (does Poser even do normal maps?)

That and also most of the best Poser stuff isn't really done in Poser. In actuality, the models and morphs largely almost always rely on other programs, leaving Poser as little more than an average render engine and above average character posing tool... while also a below average character animation tool, with marginal support for import/export.
Even the new Poser "pro" exports non-editable animations; they tout it's ability to export animation, but only for rendering, not editing.

That sounds like "anti-Poser", but it's more like disappointment, considering what it could be, but probably never will be.

hrgiger
05-18-2008, 05:09 AM
Well... if you had been part of the "Poser thread"... what was it... six to nine months ago.... you would have seen excellent examples provided by Mr. Rid that shows that Poser can help to create some incredible-looking characters THAT DO NOT look like mannequins. ONCE AGAIN.... it all depends upon the artist using the software. How many people here would dispute that? Terrence Walker has used Poser.

Blanket statements like this above are not true and do not help at all.

Ok, I'm sorry. 99% of the time Poser models look like mannequins. That's because 99% of the time, people use poser for what it is. Pre-made modesl that they don't have to build themselves.

Of course it's in the hands of the artist, who's disputing that? Crayons are toys too, but they've been used to make works of art. I've seen some very impressive artwork done with MS Paint. But that wasn't the point here.

Silkrooster
05-18-2008, 10:12 PM
I think it is pointless to debate poser. Everybody has their tools of the trade, some like poser, some do not. period. If you have time, you model it. If you don't, then you use stock art. There are thousands of pros who use stock art(and I don't mean just 3d either). Poser falls into that catagory, as it also falls into amateur catagory. There are a lot of beginners who do not have the cash or can see the need to spend the cash when a low priced program like poser can create quick art. Some of these beginners do not see the need to learn how to do proper lighting, posing, etc. either.
When judging the quality of any rendered peice, it falls onto the "artist" not the program.
Anyways, enough rambling on.
Silk

Verlon
05-18-2008, 10:21 PM
Ok, I'm sorry. 99% of the time Poser models look like mannequins. That's because 99% of the time, people use poser for what it is. Pre-made modesl that they don't have to build themselves.

Of course it's in the hands of the artist, who's disputing that? Crayons are toys too, but they've been used to make works of art. I've seen some very impressive artwork done with MS Paint. But that wasn't the point here.

99.99% of people who paint aren't Michaelangelo, but that doesn't mean paint sucks.

mattclary
05-19-2008, 08:18 AM
Hi,

I am considering purchasing Lightwave 3D... I already own Poser 7 and I am wondering if spending the additional money for another 3D software app would be worth it. So my primary question is:

What specifically can Lightwave 3D do that Poser cannot do?



Can you use Poser to create, animate, and render an episode of Battlestar Galactica? :thumbsup:

mccabejc
05-19-2008, 09:42 AM
As a longtime user of LW (since the Amiga days), and Poser, and now Daz Studio, I'd like to weigh in...

As has been said before, these applications have entirely different purposes. LW is a jack of all trades, where you can build, texture, and animate virtually anything. Poser, on the other hand, is designed for character renders and animations. You cannot build anything from scratch in Poser, but you can build things in an external modelling application (including some free ones, like Blender) which you can then rig and animate in Poser.

However, Poser is NOT necessarily limited to "stock art". While you can buy (or get for free) a whole library of characters, texture maps, clothing, etc. (human, animal, whatever), one must realize that 90%of any human (or other) character is identical from one person to the other. Most of the differences can be handled fairly well by morphs, which are included in most of the "stock" characters. Therefore, only the most lazy Poser user loads a stock character into a prefab scene and hits "Render". Unfortunately, there are many of those out there.

Personally, I despise Poser, solely because it's so counter-intuitive. And I'm not a big fan of LW either, partly because it's user interface is so, well...let's just say it's like it was designed by programmers, not users or artists. Kinda like the Mac vs. PC debate. But for doing renders or animations of any type of character, Poser is far easier to use then LW. At least Poser gives you a number of base characters and morphs and hair and clothing to start from, unlike LW. If you don't like the "stock" characters, you can make your own morphs fairly easily. Same applies for skin textures, clothing, etc.

And if you're just interested in single frame renders of characters, Daz Studio is, IMO, by far the best choice. And it's free.

Honestly, I've seen these "Poser looks like mannequins" arguments for years, and IMO if the folks who put forth those arguments would spend half as much time trying Poser as they have trying to learn LW (I'm still learning after how many years??), I think you'd change your minds. And you'd also see that it is, IMO, light years ahead of LW in terms of clothing dynamics, user interface, and availability of stock, incredibly low priced characters you can modify as you'd like.

starbase1
05-19-2008, 09:44 AM
And lets not forget the HUGE number of training vids available for free for lightwave round here! They will give you a very good idea of the feel of the program, and what it is like to use once you start to get fluent!

One thing to bear in mind - you will be making most of the objects yourself, so you are less likely to get discouraged if you pick projects that are not too challenging on the modelling front at first. As a poser user you are probably interested in figures, but it's a bit much to jump in the deep end and start trying to make a photorealistic human at the start.

You might find it easier to get started gently by, for example, exporting some of your poser figures, and experimenting with lighting and texturing them in lightwave.

I think you will be seriously impressed with things like the environmental / radiosity lighting, and the use of sub-surface scattering will make the human skin look a lot more reaistic too.

LW users are by and large a friendly and helpful bunch, and if you have some specific interests many here will be happy to give you some pointers on getting started.

mccabejc
05-19-2008, 11:28 AM
Thanks again...

One more question if I may... once you learn Lightwave 3D, how long does it usually take to create a (not too advanced) typical figure in Lightwave?

i2dontknow84

Creating a typical figure in LW takes a long time. A very long time. As a matter of fact, over the years I've tried many times to generate a character and rig it for animation. I've tried using Poser objects as a base and modifying them, then rigging and animating. That's okay, but it doesn't resolve the texturing issue, which means you then have to find some way to generate a realistic skin texture map for your figure. And eyes. And then you have to generate hair, which in my experience is a huge pain in LW. There are competing options, none of which is really good. And for each step you'll need to read books, and watch videos, and spend hours and days and months learning. Some folks like that. I don't. I just want to get what's in my head onto the screen. With LW, be prepared for months and months of work if you're starting from scratch. You may get there, but when you do you'll be sweating and battered and bruised.

In contrast, if you want to generate and animation of, say, a Caucasian male walking down a street wearing a business suit, you can do it in Poser with only a few days work at the most. And it will probably look better than what you can develop from scratch in LW. Although the LW renders will look really, really nice... :)

Sarford
05-19-2008, 11:30 AM
LW users are by and large a friendly and helpful bunch

...just DON'T mention poser.... (see the above nine posts) :D

Sekhar
05-19-2008, 12:48 PM
Poser is good for quickly/easily creating characters with dynamics, hair, animation, etc. A week should be all you need. Cloth/hair is especially good - hair in LW is no match (Sas lite or FFX). Excellent for simulating background/atmosphere figures - e.g., people in a sidewalk render or guy walking in the dark. Not so good if you want close-ups, refined animations, etc.

In any case, you're pretty much stuck to Poser for posing/rendering. There's decent integration however with Vue, and the new Poser PRO is supposed to work ok with Maya, Max, etc. (not LW yet), though I believe you still need to rig in Poser. Even if you do export out fine, the meshes are pretty dense and hard to animate.

LW on the other hand is an extremely powerful, versatile package (like Maya, Max, C4D, etc.) that can produce spectacular photorealistic renders. You can start producing decent looking non-organic stuff (like gadgets, architecture) pretty quickly, but creating anything close to what Poser produces can easily take years. Learning LW from scratch is not a good alternative to Poser if all you're looking for is to create characters (especially human).

mccabejc
05-19-2008, 01:05 PM
Actually, while we're on the subject, don't overlook the Daz Carrara software. From what I've seen it's kinda like Poser on steroids. It imports all the Poser stuff, but also has modelling built in, plus landscape/terrain/tree generation, plus network rendering (Pro version), plus global illumination, physics & particles, etc. And you can get a deal for about $200 until the end of May.

Tony_R_B
05-19-2008, 01:21 PM
Actually, while we're on the subject, don't overlook the Daz Carrara software. From what I've seen it's kinda like Poser on steroids. It imports all the Poser stuff, but also has modelling built in, plus landscape/terrain/tree generation, plus network rendering (Pro version), plus global illumination, physics & particles, etc. And you can get a deal for about $200 until the end of May.

Carrara 6 Pro (user for 18 months) is a goodish program, but it has some significant flaws and iffy support. Daz now have it and it may improve, but truth is at the moment that Poser has better integration than D/S.

I like the rendering in C6 Pro, but put too many models in and - oh dear. Modeling - limited and a bit buggy - some nice idea's. Landscapes - no competitor to Vue.

LW outstrips C6 easily as a modeler and a render engine. Much more flexibility, fewer crashes. Not as easy to integrate with poser. Poser Pro is a bit easier, but not simple.

As for poser it is a tool.

I have always used a hammer to bang in a nail rather than a screwdriver.
LW is a hammer; Poser is a screwdriver. Try not to confuse the two. :stumped:

NAS
05-19-2008, 04:47 PM
I think a better analogy would be that Poser is a rubber stamp and LW is a pen

I have been using LW and Poser about the same time and i also bought the original Pro Pack

The fact is this
If you learn to model and animate in Lightwave you wont ever go ack to using Poser its a s simple as that

Poser is good for getting new people into the artform or indeed having a little mess around for immediate satisfaction
But it isn't a serious app yet and unless they radically change the way it works it wont be

DAZ Studio has the potential to be a really useful character animation and posing package as long as it is intergrated more with other packages and keeps getting support


NAS

zapper1998
05-19-2008, 05:31 PM
Comparing LightWave 3D to Poser ... hmmmm

Is Like comparing a 747 [LightWave 3D] to a Volkswagen [Poser]

NAS
05-19-2008, 06:57 PM
Well i would think that mapping animated sequences of characters to planes would be even easier when doing archviz but i have done very little of that so maybe the requirments are much higher nowadays

NAS

AbnRanger
05-20-2008, 05:41 AM
To the original poster...sure, Poser has it's uses...like I said earlier, there are times when you may need a rubber boat (Poser), and where a yacht would be overkill or unfeasible, but there's a whole 'nother range of things you can do with a yacht that's not possible with a raft...like getting shipwrecked on Gilligans Island :D...oh sorry, wrong analogy. :foreheads
Seriously, it's really not worth bringing a Poser character into another program to rig for animation. You're MUCH better off starting from scratch (although it may be handy to use the poser figures as reference by rendering out front, top and side views), and putting edgeloops and points exactly where you want them as you go, and the aim is to build a very low poly character so that rigging and ironing out the trouble areas goes smoother. In the end, it's cleaner and faster than trying to fool with the spaghetti mess that poser models give you.

So, it's not just custom building a model so that you can say that you did it. With the understanding of the difficulties that rigging, and uv layout present, you WANT to build the model yourself, in order to minimize those difficulties and have the cleanest geometry possible.
This goes just for characters...Poser isn't going to do a thing for you when you have to do motion graphics, visualFX, dynamics, etc. It's merely an augmentary tool that helps in some circumstances, such as those previously mentioned. That's all that it's developers intended for it to be...not to go head to head with any of the primary 3D programs

safetyman
05-20-2008, 06:34 AM
Most of the Daz3D models (Victoria, Aiko, Michael, etc.) were all created in Lightwave. I think they are extremely well done and very versatile if you don't want to animate. On the other hand, the models that were created and released with Poser (Jessi, James, etc.) are very poorly done, IMO. In the hands of a gifted 3D artist, you could create some great stuff that doesn't look "mannequin-y". The problem is, most of the stuff that comes out of Poser these days is done by casual users and it tends to look canned.

i2dontknow84
05-20-2008, 09:43 PM
Thanks again for all the input and for the book recommendation.

I think I will just start to learn Lightwave 3D and use Poser (oops, sorry, I said it) to create stuff until I learn Lightwave well enough.

Then I will switch back and forth to using Lightwave and Poser (yikes, slipped again) depending on how much time I have to create 3D stuff for the project at hand and depending on how good I want to make it.

In either case, I think it will be quite an enjoyable process to both learn Lightwave and to create 3D.

It beats being stuck in traffic, or in line at the DMV and it beats filing taxes while knowing that you have to dish out more money, maybe, right?

Thanks again. I will surely check back.

i2dontknow84

starbase1
05-21-2008, 03:54 AM
You might want to take a look at the current "3d Magazine", which has siome major features on modelling humans, and hours of video tutorials on the cover disk!

AbnRanger
05-21-2008, 06:28 AM
You might want to take a look at the current "3d Magazine", which has siome major features on modelling humans, and hours of video tutorials on the cover disk!
Do you mean 3D World magazine?

starbase1
05-21-2008, 07:38 AM
Do you mean 3D World magazine?

Ah, yes, whoops!

CMT
05-21-2008, 12:25 PM
Want your 3D art to look like everyone elses? Get Poser. Want the potential to create truly original 3D art? Get Lightwave.

IMI
05-21-2008, 04:37 PM
I agree, every piece of software has its limitations - and it also depends upon what you're using it for. For me, I've just used Poser as a base and then used LW (and other software) to enhance the original. I am NOT a great artist and Poser is simply a great place to start. Yes, it has limitations - but so does LW. And I don't care that either of these packages does have these limitations.



That was a response to a quote of mine regarding a limitation in Poser.
You don't always have to be in battle mode, you know. :)
What I posted was simply an observation regarding a limitation. Yes, all software has limitations, but as far as I know, my comment was made to point out something someone considering Poser as a final solution should know, not just being critical for its own sake.

bobakabob
05-21-2008, 05:35 PM
Was it Oscar Wilde who wrote, "I can resist everything except temptation. Well that and a Poser debate"?

Grow canned humans in your own computer... well why not, especially if you're a busy arch viz guy who's put a ton of work into a scene and need a long shot crowd scene in a hurry.

Always the danger that CG artists will never try creating their own characters and rely on these bland homogenous Barbie dolls for inspiration. Funny how they're almost always cross eyed. Most Poser art is weirdo geeks playing with ready made airbrushed toys. A pity because figuring out the human form is one of the great challenges of CG (or pen and paper for that matter).

On the other hand there are some truly gifted Poser artists out there. See Richard Marchand on CGtalk... a true laterally thinking genius.

starbase1
05-22-2008, 03:05 AM
Grow canned humans in your own computer... well why not, especially if you're a busy arch viz guy who's put a ton of work into a scene and need a long shot crowd scene in a hurry.

Always the danger that CG artists will never try creating their own characters and rely on these bland homogenous Barbie dolls for inspiration. Funny how they're almost always cross eyed.

On the other hand there are some truly gifted Poser artists out there. See Richard Marchand on CGtalk... a true laterally thinking genius.

The more normal problem with eyes is that they stare dead straight ahead... A huge proportion of poser images would be vastly improved by aiming the eyes slightly off centre.

I think a lot of this comes from the way Poser tries to let people with no CGI experience make pictures of people. And it is hard to do well. But the user loads up his figure and soon finds that it is genuinely easy to apply poses, make a walk cycle, change viewpoint, and so forth. Poser is VERY strong on the instant gratification for the new user. And there's a lot of very reasonably priced content out there.

I think the problems come primarily from the lack of a clear route to taking more control, and doing better than the canned experience. Obviously it can be done by some, but a lot of it requires mastery of external tools such as modelers and image editors, and UV mapping.

Nick

bobakabob
05-22-2008, 05:43 AM
Poser is VERY strong on the instant gratification for the new user. And there's a lot of very reasonably priced content out there.

I think the problems come primarily from the lack of a clear route to taking more control, and doing better than the canned experience. Obviously it can be done by some, but a lot of it requires mastery of external tools such as modelers and image editors, and UV mapping.

Nick

Poser and Daz Studio are a good introduction to 3D. They also offer some interesting tools - the "desktop mocap" in Daz is a stroke of design genius. I remember 3D World giving away Poser 1 in the late 90s and it was a revelation. Then it seemed pitched at artists and 'lifedrawers' who needed a reference tool.

Busy studios and freelancers with tight deadlines can make good use of readymade humans. There is the danger of creating bland generic looking models but good artists can customise them beyond recognition. The best artists such as Marchand use Poser in a creative inventive way.

But there's a danger many artists will stifle their potential and become over reliant on these tools. A shame as there's nothing more rewarding than building a character from scratch... well that's after you've pulled your hair out with frustration.

i2dontknow84
05-23-2008, 09:36 PM
Hi,

How could one master external tools such as modelers, image editors and UV mapping? Are those tools within Lightwave 3D? If not, where are those tools and the learning materials for them? And what is CGI anyway?

Quoting myself: Dummies can become masterful non-dummies if they have the desire, commitment, perseverance, patience, help and the right information.

Just got the LW DVD's by the way. Watched about 2 hours of them so far. You folks are right... very powerful.

i2dontknow84

Mr Rid
05-23-2008, 10:15 PM
http://www.themastercrayonartist.com/

Unfortunately the site is under revamping. But an example of how the artist commands the tool.

starbase1
05-24-2008, 04:47 AM
Hi,
How could one master external tools such as modelers, image editors and UV mapping? Are those tools within Lightwave 3D? If not, where are those tools and the learning materials for them? And what is CGI anyway?
i2dontknow84

Lightwave comes with a pretty decent modeler. You can use other modelers with it, for human figures as an example some people find zbrush and similar tools very useful for painting on fine relief details, such as veins.

UV mapping is built in, but again some like external tools.

I think it is fair to say no 3d prog comes with everything you need, but LW comes with a LOT more built in than most. And a a much lower price than most.

You will need an external image editor, and you will need to become fairly good with it if you want to make good texture maps. It does not really matter which, and some, such as photoshop elements are powerful and inexpensive.


Hi,
You folks are right... very powerful.

i2dontknow84

With great power comes great responsibility!
:D:D:D