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gr49
05-08-2008, 05:30 PM
Is there a preferred or required shooting size/composition for the talent when shooting the greenscreen for use in Live Set. I see that The talent in the demos is standing and appears to have been composed head to toe. I videotaped a head to waist shot and the talent is too big for the set desk. How can I correct this? What shots are you using for your talent: Full, Medium Long Shot, etc?

Thanks

joseburgos
05-08-2008, 07:46 PM
Use the alignment LiveSet to frame your shot.

SBowie
05-09-2008, 06:43 AM
Josť is correct, of course. The Align Camera shots let you frame talent correctly. The designer of the LiveSet basically determines this for you. Some sets require a full body view, others don't.

When creating a new set, you generally want to avoid a design that requires you to use camera sources at anything larger than their native resolution. Cropping is fine, as is scaling down. but if you 'go too close' the LiveSet must actually upscale the live source... undesirable of course, especially close up where it will be easily seen.

For this reason, the close up shots largely dictate LiveSet design. You basically frame the talent to suit those shots at 1:1 (scaling down for longer shots is fine.)

gr49
05-09-2008, 11:39 AM
I probably did not explain my problem very well. I am shooting the greenscreen talent on location, away from my computer and use of the VT5 LiveSet sizing tools. I guess I could capture the footage and then resize it in the Control Tree to match the outlines. Is there a better method to achieving the correct sizing than this?

Thanks Jose and SBowie

SBowie
05-09-2008, 11:46 AM
Tricky task ... it would be easier if you VT[5] was on set, so you could test both the actual camera alignment and greenscreen setup (lighting, etc.)

Otherwise, you need to try to approximate the same composition as seen in the Align Cam shots for the set you want to use. You might even, in some cases, use a flip-out LCD monitor or an external monitoring solution on the set to try to eyeball the scene to match the required composition. Maybe Josť will have a better idea (than grease pencil on your LCD) ;)

joseburgos
05-09-2008, 12:07 PM
I have printed to transparency the alignment and taped over the LCD.
The concept would work for an external monitor as well.
A simple cardboard rig allows you you drop in the different alignments much like a lens filter in design.

Steve, did I tell you this once in conversation or where you just fishing?
Man that is weird cause I only did that once about two months ago and do not remember telling anyone.

Take care,

SBowie
05-09-2008, 04:13 PM
Steve, did I tell you this once in conversation or where you just fishing?No, it just seemed like a natural idea, and I thought you might have tried something similar. :)

Another possibility would be to make 'cam align' targas, and bring along a laptop with SE installed - do a DV capture from a camera, and ajdust the came until it lines up with the Targa.

joseburgos
05-09-2008, 07:11 PM
Yes that and some other pieces of software could as well.
Good idea and looks better than my masking tape, jury rigged transparency method :)

Take care,

SBowie
05-10-2008, 06:00 AM
Sure, actually that's a really good idea. With Aura or Mirage installed, you could view a DV signal live on the project window, with the cam align outline in another layer as guide. Cool. :)

billmi
05-16-2008, 10:34 AM
I probably did not explain my problem very well. I am shooting the greenscreen talent on location, away from my computer and use of the VT5 LiveSet sizing tools. I guess I could capture the footage and then resize it in the Control Tree to match the outlines. Is there a better method to achieving the correct sizing than this?


What I do is to take some of NewTek's stock footage with a person in the right position, and feed that to whatever monitor I'm going to be using with the camera (even the flip-out monitor on the side of the camera works fine.) I've got a DV tape with the key angles on it. I overlay the monitor with some plastic (plastic cling-wrap and gaffer's tape to secure it works fine) then trace the outline on the plastic. Then I'm good to go.

It's like being old-school when safe zones were marked on monitors with grease pencil.