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chris_h_088
04-30-2008, 12:46 PM
I was wondering if anyone knew wether or not there is a way to stream in HD?

Jim_C
04-30-2008, 01:17 PM
Nope. Not with a Tricaster. Not yet anyway.

ACross
04-30-2008, 03:00 PM
Nope. Not with a Tricaster. Not yet anyway.

I have seen a good number of streams recently that call themselves "HD". In the vast majority of these the vertical resolution was actually 480 lines (and in some cases slightly below that) although they where almost all 16:9 video. TriCaster can actually stream these resolutions and aspect ratios today and so certainly could produce what I have seen termed as "HD Streaming".

If you have any further questions or comments, please do not hesitate to let me know.

Andrew

Jim_C
04-30-2008, 03:09 PM
I have seen a good number of streams recently that call themselves "HD". In the vast majority of these the vertical resolution was actually 480 lines (and in some cases slightly below that) although they where almost all 16:9 video. TriCaster can actually stream these resolutions and aspect ratios today and so certainly could produce what I have seen termed as "HD Streaming".

If you have any further questions or comments, please do not hesitate to let me know.

Andrew

You been haniging out with the marketing guys eh Andrew? ;)

ACross
04-30-2008, 03:37 PM
You been haniging out with the marketing guys eh Andrew? ;)

Well, no more than usual. I am actually not trying to spin this at all. I seem to get put on a lot of cc lists every time anyone sees any cool streaming application lists and I am just making an observation on what I have seen. For instance, the highest resolution Hulu offer as an HD stream is 480p (they offer higher resolution downloads on some very small number of clips.)

Andrew

SBowie
04-30-2008, 03:38 PM
I think the first iteration of 'actual' HD (not HD as in 'Heavy Duty'!) streaming video is going to turn up as 720p.

Jim_C
04-30-2008, 04:01 PM
Well, no more than usual. I am actually not trying to spin this at all. I seem to get put on a lot of cc lists every time anyone sees any cool streaming application lists and I am just making an observation on what I have seen. For instance, the highest resolution Hulu offer as an HD stream is 480p (they offer higher resolution downloads on some very small number of clips.)

I see what you are saying, but of course they are still not streaming officially defined HD resolutions.

Quiet1onTheSet
04-30-2008, 04:09 PM
I see what you are saying, but of course they are still not streaming officially defined HD resolutions.The reading of product literature and listening to marketing hype aside, I'm now wondering if 480p, at 30 Hz, would look noticeably better than 480i at 60 Hz.

Anybody know if anything's been written on the subject? Would make for an interesting read.

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Jim Plant
04-30-2008, 05:14 PM
Jim C. wrote:

"I see what you are saying, but of course they are still not streaming officially defined HD resolutions."
=====================



In the streaming world there are no "officially defined" resolutions. Those are broadcast market definitions and they don't necessarily translate straight across to the streaming world. That's not marketing spin...that's just the way it is right now.

Here's an article from Streaming Media magazine that addresses this issue:

http://www.streamingmedia.com/article.asp?id=10073&page=1&c=31

-Jim

===========
Article excerpt:

What Exactly Is HD?
As soon as we start talking about online HD video, a very important question is raised: What in the heck do we mean by “HD”? It’s a slippery question without any one well-defined answer. Broadcast standards alone have the three-sided HD coin of 720p, 1080i, and 1080p.

Combine this lack of a hard definition with the sex appeal of calling something “high definition,” and it’s not surprising the term “HD” can mean many things to many people.

“We don’t really think in terms of HD,” says MTV’s Nick Rockwell. “CDNs are marketing the push to higher bitrates as ‘HD online’ because it has a nice ring to it. HD is a firm specification on TV, but online there is no such thing. There’s a whole continuum of bitrates. So instead we say that we’re looking at higher-quality delivery.”

“There’s definitely a lot of ambiguity out there,” says Akamai’s Suzanne Johnson. “We’re seeing a lot of people calling streams at 1.5Mbps HD. And while they certainly are much higher def, they’re not HD in the strictest sense. We believe trying to be as close to the broadcast definition as possible makes the most sense.”

“We’re defining HD however our customers want to, all the way up to 1080p, and we’ve got the ability to go to 1366p all ready,” says Limelight’s Mike Gordon. “We aren’t ideologues about how HD has to be the following, and there’s no limitation on what we can deliver from an HD standards standpoint. The question is what do our customers want to consider it. Frankly, I’d say the highest aspiration today is 720p, but that’s just a function of the graphics performance of PCs, the encoding rates, and the amount of bits that need to be moved.”

“We see HD as video that is 1280x720 without stipulating a bitrate or frame rate,” says Vimeo’s Lodwick.

And what does Adobe say? “When you look at what HD is when encoded in H.264, 480p video looks good between 1.5—3Mbps, 720p between 3—7Mbps, and 1080 between 8—15Mbps,” says Adobe’s Towes. “Being able to sustain a stream above 15Mbps is just not a reality right now, but it’s only blocked by consumer bandwidth to the home
===========

Jim_C
04-30-2008, 05:46 PM
Jim C. wrote:

"I see what you are saying, but of course they are still not streaming officially defined HD resolutions."
=====================



In the streaming world there are no "officially defined" resolutions. Those are broadcast market definitions and they don't necessarily translate straight across to the streaming world. That's not marketing spin...that's just the way it is right now.

Here's an article from Streaming Media magazine that addresses this issue:

http://www.streamingmedia.com/article.asp?id=10073&page=1&c=31

-Jim



aww c'mon now... ;) :D

But there IS a defintion for HD resolutions. Just because it was established for broadcast why should it not be the same for streaming? Which is still actually broadcasting.
Just my opinion of course, but still sounds like spin so folks can put the 'HD' label on as much as they can.

I agree with Steve, when the stream hits 720p THEN we can call it HD. (because it will be) :)

Jim_C
04-30-2008, 06:08 PM
I was thinking.. keeping the new 'non-definition' of HD in mind, we could have been saying VT4 can edit HD all this time.

Q: Can VT4 edit HD footage?
A: For broadcast no, for streaming, yes.

:)
:deviliconthing:
;)

Quiet1onTheSet
04-30-2008, 06:13 PM
I was thinking.. keeping the new 'non-definition' of HD in mind, we could have been saying VT4 can edit HD all this time.

Q: Can VT4 edit HD footage?
A: For broadcast no, for streaming, yes.

:)
:deviliconthing:
;)
Oo-ooooh, that's low!

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Jim_C
04-30-2008, 06:26 PM
Oo-ooooh, that's low!

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No, that's good marketing.

:hey:

Quiet1onTheSet
04-30-2008, 06:32 PM
No, that's good marketing.

:hey:
Oo-ooooh, "Deeeeeep!"

(Man, he's sure quick on his feet, tonight!)

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:rolleyes:

ted
04-30-2008, 10:48 PM
Well, last year I saw HD in the names of TriPods and this year HD on sunglasses. What does that imply? :D

Quiet1onTheSet
05-01-2008, 07:58 PM
Well, last year I saw HD in the names of TriPods and this year HD on sunglasses. What does that imply? :D "Marketing folly" more severe than Sony's flippant use of the "Full HD" nomenclature on 1080i gear.

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