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View Full Version : Background goes MIA in FCP



grey_matters
04-27-2008, 07:16 AM
I modeled a simple landscape and had a UFO fly overhead, comeback and hover and then take off. I rendered the animation out to a Quicktime .mov, when I import it into Final Cut Pro, the viewer looks fine, but whe I add it to the timeline the backgound dissapears. nothing but black. Any ideas here? Is this a bug or, is there something about the exported mov file settings? I'm using 9.3.1

toby
04-27-2008, 09:19 PM
When there's no geometry in the background you get no alpha channel in the background, that's why it gets matted out. Try converting the footage to 24 bit before bringing it into FCP ( or see if there's an option in fcp to change the alpha )

You should also know that almost everyone here recommends rendering to an image sequence instead of directly to a QT, it's much safer. I'll elaborate if you like.

miguel_dthings
04-28-2008, 02:49 AM
Toby is right. At least in FCE, right click on the item, choose item properties. Then find Alpha, right click where it says "straight" and change to "none/ignore". That should do it.

grey_matters
04-28-2008, 06:56 AM
Thanks - I'll try that today.

Toby, would you mind elaborating on the image sequence thing?

toby
04-28-2008, 02:23 PM
This has come up many times over the years, so I actually made a webpage... which has since gone down :D
But here's the text :

1. Crashes or power outages can ruin a quicktime or avi, file, forcing you to start the render from the beginning again.

2. When rendering to frames, you can stop and restart the render whenever you feel like it.

3. If one or a series of your frames renders wrong, you can go back and re-render that one frame without having to do any editing.

4. Each frame is numbered for you automatically.

5. You can import an image sequence at any frame rate you want.

6. You can inspect frames or part of your animation before it's completely rendered.

7. You can save 10, 16 bit-per-channel or floating-point image sequences (HDR) and do things like adjust the exposure after rendering.

8. Occasional conflicts with QT and LW and/or framerate issues

And since you already have QT Pro with fcp, it's a no-brainer to make the sequence into a qt.

grey_matters
04-29-2008, 09:14 AM
This has come up many times over the years, so I actually made a webpage... which has since gone down :D
But here's the text :

1. Crashes or power outages can ruin a quicktime or avi, file, forcing you to start the render from the beginning again.

2. When rendering to frames, you can stop and restart the render whenever you feel like it.

3. If one or a series of your frames renders wrong, you can go back and re-render that one frame without having to do any editing.

4. Each frame is numbered for you automatically.

5. You can import an image sequence at any frame rate you want.

6. You can inspect frames or part of your animation before it's completely rendered.

7. You can save 10, 16 bit-per-channel or floating-point image sequences (HDR) and do things like adjust the exposure after rendering.

8. Occasional conflicts with QT and LW and/or framerate issues

And since you already have QT Pro with fcp, it's a no-brainer to make the sequence into a qt.


very cool - makes sense, thanks for posting. :thumbsup:

toby
04-29-2008, 12:53 PM
very cool - makes sense, thanks for posting. :thumbsup:
:beerchug:
Do you work for grey matter in venice? I met someone named 'Grey' a few years ago, the proprietor -

grey_matters
05-01-2008, 06:23 AM
:beerchug:
Do you work for grey matter in venice? I met someone named 'Grey' a few years ago, the proprietor -

nope - just a coincidence I guess