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captdkp
04-26-2008, 08:56 AM
Hi gang,

A newbe here with Speededit and was hoping someone could take the time to help me with a problem.

I can't find this in the manual but I have 4 or 5 nine minute clips and would like to make several 10-15 sec. clips out of them. I guess I am not finding a good way to do it as I am having to put the 9 minute clip in the time line, marking the in and out, making adjustments, saving and then starting a new project and loading the same clip and doing it over an over.

Does anyone have a better, faster way. I sure would appreciate the help.

[email protected]

ted
04-26-2008, 10:46 AM
You can drag the adjusted clip into a folder and that will make a "pointer" for that trimed clip. But it's only a pointer and still uses the initial clip so you can't delete the initial clip or that pointer will be worthless.

Or you can render the trimed clip, but that will add more storage requirements.

Quiet1onTheSet
04-26-2008, 01:47 PM
Hi gang, I can't find this in the manual but I have 4 or 5 nine minute clips and would like to make several 10-15 sec. clips out of them. ... I am having to put the 9 minute clip in the time line, marking the in and out, making adjustments, saving and then starting a new project and loading the same clip and doing it over an over.

Does anyone have a better, faster way. I sure would appreciate the help.

[email protected] the helpful advice Ted served up, you could alternatively try this...

1. Select a clip that you'll be using more than once in the final edit by clicking on it once.
2. "CTRL + drag" away from that clip, to create a clone -- placing it elsewhere within the editor. Set the I/O points for that clone.

3. Go back to the original clip and repeat step 2, to create yet another "instance" but with differing In/Out points, etc. Lather, rinse, repeat.

4. Render out your new clip to the desired file format. You're doing all this, within the same project.

Q1

billmi
04-28-2008, 12:48 PM
And another method for skinning the same cat.....
This is what I've taken to doing instead of batch capture, since it saves the shuttling until after my footage is in the computer, taking the linear tape shuttling time out of the equation.

Place a single big clip on the timeline, and scroll through it with the edit line. Every spot I need to cut, I razor cut the clip with the "c" shortcut. When I'm done, I control-click on the refuse (the clips I won't use) in the storyboard and delete them. The remaining clips, if they are going to be used for editing, I drag to a filebin, which saves them as instances (they look and work like individual clips in the editor, but they all refer to the one physical original clip on the hard drive.)

If I need to use those clips outside of the VT environment (they can be dropped straight into a DDR as well as SpeedEdit) I right click on each and select "Render Clip" - multiples can be rendering at the same time.

CreatvGnius
04-28-2008, 02:34 PM
Place a single big clip on the timeline, and scroll through it with the edit line. Every spot I need to cut, I razor cut the clip with the "c" shortcut. When I'm done, I control-click on the refuse (the clips I won't use) in the storyboard and delete them. The remaining clips, if they are going to be used for editing, I drag to a filebin, which saves them as instances (they look and work like individual clips in the editor, but they all refer to the one physical original clip on the hard drive.)

If I need to use those clips outside of the VT environment (they can be dropped straight into a DDR as well as SpeedEdit) I right click on each and select "Render Clip" - multiples can be rendering at the same time.

Very, very astute of you Bill. Great suggestion.
-PeterG

Quiet1onTheSet
04-30-2008, 10:48 AM
And another method for skinning the same cat.....
This is what I've taken to doing instead of batch capture, since it saves the shuttling until after my footage is in the computer, taking the linear tape shuttling time out of the equation.

Place a single big clip on the timeline, and scroll through it with the edit line. Every spot I need to cut, I razor cut the clip with the "c" shortcut.

As a visual aid, for enhancing Bill's approach, I might hold down the "V", while dragging the reject clip portions down a couple of tracks to what I'll call the "rejection layer" throughout the search and cut process Bill described above, 'til I've reached the end of chopping up that super-long clip.

Then, when I'm ready to delete all the undesirable clip segments, I'd simply
1. zoom back just far enough to see the entire project at once.
2. Click the first clip on the "rejection layer", then hold down "SHIFT", and click the last clip on that same rejection layer, then hit "DELETE".
3. SAVE the project, then move on to tweaking it.

In summary, adding this convention to billmi's approach helps mitigate against the likelihood of
1. mistakenly deleting desirable clip segments, while also
2. mistakenly retaining some clip segments you intended for deletion.
3. mistakenly loosing the growing "selection" of clips I've highlighted along the way with the relatively risky "CTRL+Click+Click+Click... + DELETE" methodology.

Q1

Adam_LightPlay
05-06-2008, 08:51 PM
And, if you actually do want to get rid of the original Big Clip...
1. Follow the instructions above regarding how to trim out what you want. (I also like the KB Shortcuts "I" and "O", to mark the in or out right where the position bar is.
2. Right click on each small clip and Choose "Render Selected", in whatever format, to a desired video drive.
Once that are all rendered, and checked, you can really delete the original source clip and get that space back.