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RonB
04-23-2008, 01:06 PM
I was fascinated with the painting by John Everett Millais when I first saw a print of it many years ago in high school art class. His composition is wonderful and evokes the famous monologue where Queen Gertrude says, "There is a willow grows aslant the brook", and how Ophelia was, "incapable of her own distress".

I intended to do a modern urban take on it but Millais' painting is so rich I just went ahead and stayed with the original instead. I hope that isn't too cheesy.
Modeled in Lightwave, rendered in Maxwell, Daz model.

Ron

http://www.dahothouse.com/work/Ophelia.jpg

bluerider
04-24-2008, 09:02 AM
Thanks for posting that, I'm a big fan of that period in Art History.

If the Pre Raphaelites had been produced by any other country they would have received so much more credit. I was sick of being told at college that the British Isles never produced any significant contribution to the visual arts. I would look at painters like Millais' and think, " what I am being told is not consistent with what I am seeing".

I think in the original painting the Models father tried to press charges because his daughter got something from the cold water she was immersed in for the painting, bronchitis, hypothermia, something like that..

The lamps Millais used to heat the bath tub went out and the poor women was posing in freezing cold water.

RonB
04-24-2008, 10:42 AM
Bluerider,
Wow, a great story about the model and posing in cold water. I have never heard that before...thanks for sharing it. I completely agree with you about the Pre Raphaelites' treatment, what a shame.
One of my favorites is Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema. Take a look at his work "Expectation", he uses subsurface scattering in the marble of the steps and bench, just beautiful. Those guys were fabulous with light and color.

Cheers, Ron

bluerider
04-24-2008, 11:13 AM
Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, he was a celebrity during the Victorian and Edwardian period. However, contempary Art Historians write him off as Kitch.

I love his work, attention to detail and the classical periods he derives his inspiration from. I don't care the fact that he romanitises these periods in history. This is another stick to beat him with in regard to contempary Art Historians. But its odd how they avoid these peripheral issues when championing their degenerate "anti-Artists" whose philosophies and world views are rarely tackled because of their leaps of faith from their usual malaise of nihilism.. so they focus on the aesthetics.

I should have started a disclaimer before writing my rants.

RonB
04-24-2008, 12:57 PM
Oh no, I really enjoy reading your comments...You are obviously very well read and studied.
"world views are rarely tackled because of their leaps of faith from their usual malaise of nihilism."...That is a great line!:thumbsup: Say more, say more...

LOL,:D
Ron

bluerider
04-24-2008, 03:50 PM
After that compliment, I expects a giant "Terry Gillainesque" foot with the words Art Critique emblased on the side ( done in "Jackson Pollock font" no less) to come down out of the clouds and smooch me like a bug.

Surrealist.
04-25-2008, 08:43 PM
Beautiful work. Just stunning.

Digital Hermit
05-01-2008, 05:45 PM
Really, a great piece... technically well executed.

You know those of us who are aficionados of the traditional, should try your route and reproduce the classics in LW... (Well, for what it is worth you have peaked my interest!)

I know his name brings scorn to some, but Oddity did a great job of reproducing Vemeer's, "The Milkmaid"

http://www.newtek.com/forums/showthread.php?t=54618

As for me, I always learn something when I reproduce another’s masterwork. Did it do the same for you?

Regards,

TripD
05-01-2008, 09:08 PM
Very nice. Are you by chance the same rob b that did that fabulous rocket ship a few years back? If so..... you should revisit that rascal for our viewing pleasure!

RonB
05-05-2008, 02:22 PM
Thanks for your kind comments guys...

Yep TripD that's me! Here you go...

Cheers, Ron

http://www.dahothouse.com/work/rocket1.jpg

bluerider
05-08-2008, 09:19 AM
Wow......had not seen that before, thanks for re posting RonB :thumbsup:

bobakabob
05-17-2008, 04:36 AM
Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, he was a celebrity during the Victorian and Edwardian period. However, contempary Art Historians write him off as Kitch.

I love his work, attention to detail and the classical periods he derives his inspiration from. I don't care the fact that he romanitises these periods in history. This is another stick to beat him with in regard to contempary Art Historians. But its odd how they avoid these peripheral issues when championing their degenerate "anti-Artists" whose philosophies and world views are rarely tackled because of their leaps of faith from their usual malaise of nihilism.. so they focus on the aesthetics.

I should have started a disclaimer before writing my rants.

RonB,
This is stunning modelling and texturing work. Very ambitious and you've almost pulled it off, certainly in the composition. My only crits would be that the skin tones don't look subtle enough and the colours of the scene aren't quite as rich and varied as the original. Only to be expected as the Pre Raphaelites sometimes spent years on these images. If you keep going at this, it will be a 3D masterpiece. It would be great to take us into the world of the scene and render it from different angles.

Bluerider,
Agree with all your points :) The Pre Raphaelites are often unfairly dismissed as contrived even kitsch because they appeared to be regressing back to classical figure representation combined with an obsessive interest in idealised women and romantic literature.

IMO their work is an impressive blend of craftsmanship and atmosphere and takes you into another dimension. If you've ever seen these paintings close up you'd be amazed by by the blazing textures and colour. The strange fascination with minute detail also gives the paintings a hallucinatory dreamlike quality. It's as if the otherworldly scenes they depict go beyond the constraints of the picture frame.

meshpig
05-17-2008, 08:44 AM
If the Pre Raphaelites had been produced by any other country they would have received so much more credit. I was sick of being told at college that the British Isles never produced any significant contribution to the visual arts.


It's weird what you hear in art schools. Personally, I think they're a waste of time and space.

John Boorman's "Excalibur" is about as far as I'd go never mind the Pre Raphealites, but what about J.M.W. Turner who made the Impressionists possible?

m
.................................................. ....................

Sorry meshpig,
I hit edit instead of quote. Sincere apologies.

heres my response anyway

Wow you mentioned one of my favorite films....described as a "flawed masterpiece".

Turner yeah.......hes epic, he made the impressionist possible as well.

Joe Battle
05-19-2008, 04:13 PM
Ron, I find your Lightwave image of "Ophelia" very well done. This both in technique and in spirit after the original.
I have also enjoyed the short discussion of "Pre-Raphaelite" art coming from the point of view of Lightwave artists.

I must agree with most of the points taken about the popularity of this movement and about the validity of traditional art education in general.
I have some small perspective in this regard having been a student in two different Universities majoring in traditional life sculpture and painting. I suggest taking all of structured "pedagogy" with a grain of salt. Get what you need from it to advance your own vision and leave the rest for coffee conversation. I search for the kernel of truth and value in even the most obscure educational situations and to turn it to my advantage.

There are very separate agendas between illustration, which Lightwave and cgi in general represent, and the Fine Arts, which traditional sculpture, painting, and criticism encompass. In movies if every one likes your work you are a success. In the Fine Arts if everyone likes your work you are a failure. That is to say that illustration's main focus is the sale of product, and appropriately so. While Fine Art's main purpose is the exploration of new ground, both visually and thematically.

Believe me I've been lectured to about the failure to please everyone equating to my failure to produce good cgi images by the well respected Stephen Stahlberg at CGSociety. Conversely I been called to the mat for being out of touch with modern pedagogy at a major University Art Dept for pursuing my own style of Abstract Painting. That style is so passť don't you know. (sold one the other day for $3000.00 but again money is not what "Fine Art" is all about" :hey:)

At any rate I enjoyed your mention and discussion of the great Alma-Tadma. I too have ultimate respect for his style and technique. If you refer to a work in progress thread of mine here, Basic Diel Node Study (http://www.newtek.com/forums/showthread.php?t=81440), you will see my references to some of his paintings and a small sample of my study of his style as it relates to my own study of Lightwave in regards to transparency and reflection. I do have my own agenda and there is some mild nudity in some of my renders. I do not mean to offend.

I am a true freshman in my study of Lightwave. I have the highest respect for your talent and experience Ron. I hope to acquire a small portion of your capabilities some day and put them into service of my own statements.

Again I really enjoy your "Ophelia" render as a daring use of Lightwave out of the mainstream by a truly competent Lightwave Master.

Joe

bluerider
05-20-2008, 10:15 AM
Hey,
Great debate on this thread, good points Joe Battle. like what your saying about Product and fine art. It makes Warhol an utter failure under you premise but still, I think what you say is generally true, certainly in my experience.

meshpig
Once again sorry for editing your post when I meant to hit quote 8/
You like Boorman's Excalibur so your obviously a very good sort.

bobakabob,
First time I saw the Pre-Raphelites was in the Tate in London in the 80's was mesmerized.

Edward Burne-Jones, got to see a good collection of his in a traveling tour of his works at the Statt Museum in Stuttgart ion the late 80's. I was there to salivate over Otto Dix's work though, probably my favorite painter.

RonB,
After the constructive criticism from bobakabob are you going to do any changes on this great piece of work.

Trevor
05-20-2008, 11:10 AM
It is often said that cg humans look dead and lifeless, in this example the medium fits the subject matter beautifully.
Brilliantly executed, I can see alot of time, attention to detail and love gone into this piece.
Great work.

Cheers.

RonB
05-20-2008, 11:13 AM
Hi Guys...Thanks again for your suggestions and really worth while debate....I for one have learned a lot from the thread. My hat is off to all of you knowledgeable and great Lightwave artists that have contributed...I appreciate you all.

Yes, after all the good comments and suggestions, the latest by bobakabob, I'll post a re-render in a couple days...

Cheers,
Ron

Cheers, Ron