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jpleonard
04-15-2008, 06:03 PM
I was hoping some of the wonderful experts here could give me a little advice about how best to render an animation for a trailer that will be played in movie theaters. Does anyone know what resolution I would need to use? Do I need to use the field rendering option? And would I need to use PAL or NTSC? Please give me advice, as I am about to start on the project and I want to start with the right setting in mind. :help:

BeeVee
04-16-2008, 02:51 AM
If it's going to be played on a film projector then you will want 24fps and one of the 35mm or 65mm resolutions in Camera Properties. You won't want field rendering.

B

Surrealist.
04-16-2008, 06:14 AM
Also PAL and NTSC as well as SECAM are broadcast standards and are compressed video. That has nothing to do with projection in a theater unless it is video projection - which just about all major theaters have these days.

So how is it going to be projected?

Digital projection?
35mm Film Projection
Video projection?

Then, what is going to be the process of transferring the animation to the projected medium?

When you have answered how it is going to be projected, and how it is going to be transfered to that medium, then you can work it back to determine what an acceptable resolution would be. And someplace in there is going to be the process by which you deliver the animation to the place that will do the transfer. And of course that is going to depend on what kind of transfer it is.

But let's assume film. I would be on the phone with the actual technician - not a sales person - who is actually going to be the person doing the transfer and get from him exactly the specs he needs for his equipment and deliver that in the file format or medium he prefers or can accept.

BeeVee is correct about the res but it is just that there are a few other factors to consider and you really want to make sure you get it right.

Also I would highly recommend setting up a time with the transfer place - whatever the medium - and see if you can run a test before you bring in the final draft so you can make adjustments on your end it need be.

That's my 2C :)

serge
04-16-2008, 07:02 AM
If it's going to be played on a film projector then you will want 24fps ...
http://www.aqlibrary.org/documents/parts/other%20store/film_projector.jpg

You mean one of those things, right? But surely movie theaters these days are able to handle something other than 24fps, or not?

Lightwolf
04-16-2008, 07:17 AM
You mean one of those things, right? But surely movie theaters these days are able to handle something other than 24fps, or not?
The standard is still 24fps... but shuttered to 48Hz (i.e. 24 different frames per second, but each is displayed twice).

Cheers,
Mike

serge
04-16-2008, 07:33 AM
The standard is still 24fps... but shuttered to 48Hz (i.e. 24 different frames per second, but each is displayed twice).

Cheers,
Mike
Sorry, I don't understand how that answers the question. If you made a 30fps animation with which you want to enter a movie festival, is it likely that you'll have to convert this to 24fps, since movie theater projectors won't be able to handle anything other than 24fps?

Lightwolf
04-16-2008, 07:39 AM
Sorry, I don't understand how that answers the question. If you made a 30fps animation with which you want to enter a movie festival, is it likely that you'll have to convert this to 24fps, since movie theater projectors won't be able to handle anything other than 24fps?
If it is printed on film and proected from film then yes, it needs to be 24fps.
However, some theatres can also project video, but that's a different projector.

Cheers,
Mike

serge
04-16-2008, 07:48 AM
Okay, I understand. :)

Surrealist.
04-16-2008, 07:50 AM
But surely movie theaters these days are able to handle something other than 24fps, or not?

Well yes as Mike says 24 frames is the film standard. That carries over to many other formats too these days as a better way to view films that originate in this format. 24p video for example.

But the thing is, the new trend is toward digital projection, for one, and many theaters also have video projectors for events and even for that pre preview entertainment that is becoming more of the norm these days.

And these big digital projectors are actually designed to handle many types of input including all of the broadcast standards by way of video.

Understand that with digital projection you now have two components. 1) the projector itself and 2) whatever media player you plug into it. Whether that is a hard drive unit playing encrypted 2K resolution video files or something else plugged into its inputs.

OK, look at this:


SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: Cinetopia is the Northwest’s only all Digital Super High Definition multiplex theater. As of March 31, 2006 Cinetopia has seven (7) new state of the art Christie 2k Super High Definition Digital Projectors.


From here (http://www.cinetopiatheaters.com/cinema/digitalc.htm).

And this:


Whether it’s a power point for your next big idea or an independent feature shot on DV Cam, the Christie Cine-IPM 2K puts Christie’s new 10-bit imaging electronics to work putting your ideas in the best light. The Christie Cine-IPM 2K is the preferred choice for post-production and digital cinemas the world over.

From here (http://www.christiedigital.com/AMEN/Products/christieCineIPM2K.htm).

You have to realize that with digital projectors anything is possible.

You do get a loss of contrast with a DVD playback even on one of these, but for most other formats if the footage is clean, you get a real nice crisp display at even lower resolutions such as DV 720 X 480.

And granted something shot on a DVCAM is not going to compare to a Panavision camera, but that is not the point. The point is, these machines are designed to handle many types of presentation along side projection of studio films.

From there is is just a matter of knowing what theaters are going to have in-house as far as playback units other than the 2K.

serge
04-16-2008, 08:58 AM
Thanks for the info Richard.

I'm sure many of us are either dreaming about or already working on animations that hopefully one day will be shown to a big audience. Pretty often you see questions coming along about fps, resolution and other aspects. I guess these are considerations we have to make already before the start of our project: Do we set the timeline at 24, 25, 30 fps, or something else? I guess 30 would be safest, since it's probably wiser to later on convert 30fps to 24fps than the other way around, if necessary. (Hmm, maybe it's even wiser to render at 60fps these days?)

And about resolution, if you plan on putting your animation at first on the internet, maybe later on DVD/Blu-Ray, but maybe also one day in theaters, then you'll be saving a lot of time by immediately rendering your animation once at the highest possible resolution you can afford (at least 2K). But then, I'm not sure about possible problems with downscaling 2K to 1080 for example.

(And progressive or interlaced? Is that still really an issue these days?)

I still have a lot of reading to do on these matters. Right now I would say I'd render my animation at 30fps and 2K resolution. This seems the safest, but I'm not sure at all. :) It would be nice to know the "safest settings", if there is such a thing. :)

jpleonard
04-16-2008, 09:23 AM
I have a client that contacted me earlier this week to do a trailer for an upcoming 4 book comic series, and they want a trailer to show in theaters. The basic idea is to have the main character, with head down standing in front of the audience, as he starts to raise his head and move his eyes to look at the audience, he's talking, and transforming into a werewolf. The character then lunges toward the audience, then it goes to an ad for the comic series. I think the general area where it's going to be played in the theaters is Colorado, NM, NV, AZ. Basically out west to start with. I appreciate all the comments and details. I've never worked on something that would be used on such a large screen. I've done several animations, but most are used on the internet or DVD's. I finally have a use for fog, and cel shader, which I've been wanting to use for a while, but I usually am too busy to just play with things that are not project related.

Surrealist.
04-16-2008, 10:19 AM
Cool. There's enough info here to proceed I think.

And Serge, yeah. research. That's a great idea. :) You'll find the answers you need.

jpleonard
04-16-2008, 11:04 AM
Yeah, I know I should research on my own, which I have been, but I figured there was a lot of people here who could fill me in on the basics. I could then fill in the gaps of information as needed. Thanks again everyone for getting me on the right path to move forward with this. I'll be sure to post links to the finalized trailer as soon as I get done with it. I'm so excited..:dance:

JeffrySG
04-16-2008, 05:19 PM
I would be on the phone with the actual technician - not a sales person - who is actually going to be the person doing the transfer and get from him exactly the specs he needs for his equipment and deliver that in the file format or medium he prefers or can accept.

The first time I did anything for film output, that's exactly what I did. The techs working on that part of the film output will know more than anyone what pixel dimensions will work best for that project and any other file format requirements or settings you should use on the specific files.