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akstylish
04-11-2008, 11:12 PM
Well...I've been watching tutorials for a few months and I thought I could make something myself. Turns out I can't do **** on my own. I do remember most of techniques demonstrated in tutorials, but I still can't make an object as simple as a 3-bladed dagger. All I can do is following frigging tutorials. T_T What am I to do?!

3D Kiwi
04-12-2008, 12:27 AM
Just stick at it mate, It took me ages before i was creating anything on my own apart from boxes and reflective balls, Some people pick this stuff up straight away, others like me and maybe you it takes a bit longer.

But just keep at it and it will all fall into place.

UltraViolet
04-12-2008, 12:44 AM
Hold on there, man, lol, took me more then 2 years to learn modeling, patience is the most important thing there...

If LW modeler is your first, I would recommend using something more simple first, with fewer options, where you do not have to think about tools a lot, like Wings3D or Silo. Good luck :)

prospector
04-12-2008, 01:00 AM
Start with something around the house.
Start simple and learn the tools.
Make something as simple as a glass or coffee cup, then texture it and light it so it looks like the real one.

Then do it for speed

Then when ya got tools ok, move up to something more intricate like an asprin bottle and learn tools for that (making threads is new), texture and light that.

then do that for speed

Then maby a sink and countertop with texture and lighting.

And again for speed

Don't try to make something like a car till you have the tools down pat.
You'll just get frustraited more and more.

I know people come to this and try to build a perfect replica of the newest car on the road, or the most perfect human around from the start.

Start easy...look at basics....grab an object on your desk and turn it in your hand and think of how it can be made mabt with disks..boxes...flat planes.

It won't take long that way and you build your knowledge tool by tool.

SplineGod
04-12-2008, 01:01 AM
Its not hard to learn the software but doing something artistic with it is another matter.
What helps in those cases is to have some very good reference for the thing you want to model. Not many ppl can just make stuff up as they go. Find something you want to model that has good reference for it and dig in. :)

ZumoWrestler
04-12-2008, 01:06 AM
When learning to create anything. I mean anything. Knowing the tool to create your art is first and foremost.

Some things take a long time. When I was learning to program I didn't know what I was doing and I couldn't do anything but what was shown in the tutorials. But as you learn the different tool you can eventually start using the tools to create what you want. One thing at a time.

The 'Hello World' of modeling is a tea pot. Maybe create one of those, experiment with different tools, fail 20 times before you finally make it. Google questions. Thats how animation goes a lot of times.

When doing any type of work remember 2 key sayings.
1) Trial and Error.
2) Google it.

archijam
04-12-2008, 01:07 AM
Well...I've been watching tutorials for a few months and I thought I could make something myself. Turns out I can't do **** on my own. I do remember most of techniques demonstrated in tutorials, but I still can't make an object as simple as a 3-bladed dagger. All I can do is following frigging tutorials. T_T What am I to do?!

Firstly, from what you describe, it sounds like you try to 'remember' what the tutorial process was, then try to recreate the steps.

I always 'follow' tutorials AS i watch them, it's the only true way to learn fault-less modelling .. pause, try, try again, continue ..

Secondly, limit yourself to a few tools, then expand your technique. I CAN model most things with layers, move, rotate, the knife tool (+K), join polys (+Z) and split polys (ctrl L) .. as I got better with these tools, however, I added more to the mix.

What is it they say? "(Perfect) practice makes perfect" ?

j.

IMI
04-12-2008, 01:23 AM
I agree with everyone, especially prospector where he said "Start with something around the house."
That's pretty much what I did when I began learning to model. Just following tutorials, IMO, gives you little more than the "tutorial mentality". Tutorials are great, and necessary, and you can learn alot especially from the "project-based" types of tutorials, but at some point you have to branch out. When one day someone tells you you have to model, say, a specific ceiling fan, nobody's going to be there to give you the next step.
It's easier to learn if you pick some objects around you that are already more or less primitive shaped and then add the detail. For example, one of the first models I ever made that was half decent was a model of my dishwasher. It's already not much more than a box to begin with, and the details such as dials are easily created beginning with primitives too.
You just have to decide on something to model, create the basic shapes and then for each step ask yourself, "what's the best tool I can use to get this?" And if you don't know, ask here, or refer to the tutorials where something similar is being demonstrated.
Modeling from imagination, memory, or photos is best left til later, til you've gotten more comfortable with the tools, IMO, and simple objects right in your house are alot easier, since you have ready access to the real deal.
Furniture and appliances are great practice and great for learning, too, plus there's a huge demand for such things. Cell phones, clocks, all sorts of electronic devices - all not terribly difficult to do, but the key to it is to reduce them to their base components and build off them.
Just like drawing - every object in the world can be reduced to either simple primitives or a group of simple primitives. You just have to see it first.

parm
04-12-2008, 01:32 AM
What are you trying to make?

Why not start a thread in the WIP area. I'm sure with the guidance of other forum users. You'll be able to complete your project.

colkai
04-12-2008, 03:20 AM
Well...I've been watching tutorials for a few months and I thought I could make something myself. Turns out I can't do **** on my own.

I feel your pain, I really do.
I've been at this part-time for a while now and still don't feel like I've got anywhere. In a way, this is a good thing, as soon as you feel you've "arrived" I think your drive to learn suffers.

Keep at it, little by little, tackle slightly more ambitious things each time, do some repeat modelling. You'd be surprised at how soon you start to feel more comfortable.

What do I mean by repeat modelling? Well, build something, table, house, anything, then, start again, building on the mistakes from last time and what you figured out. Do that a few times with a few models and you start to trust yourself more.

I'd also add, go through the tutorials a few times too, lock that workflow in your head, that will allow you to then use the workflow on other items.

Now I grant, I'm basing this on my perspective only but it des work for me and it's worth a shot.
Oh, also, don't try to tackle the whole thing, don't look at something and think "oh my god - how do I do that".
Instead, look at bits of it and decided which bits you CAN tackle. See it as a collection of items, not one thing.

Example, a coffee table, just a collection of columns, torus, boxes.
I also try building mockups with primitives, the geometry doesn't have to be nice or make a "proper" mesh, but once you have the overall design in your head, the "real thing" should be easy to work on.

Here's an example I intended at some point, (like most things), to get to, an SPV from captain Scarlet, expressed purely with primitives, you could have this in the background whilst building a "real" mesh for it.

You at least are in a good place for help, overall, the LW community is one of the neatest places to be.

jcupp
04-12-2008, 08:29 AM
I agree with several posters above. Start with things around the house, that you can hold in your hand, and try to duplicate them. If you just go into modeler a play around you will tend to skip over the hard stuff. But if you have a concrete goal literally in hand it'll be easier to force yourself to actually use those hard to figure out tools in modeler.

Another thing to do is to build a simple object. Then build it again but try to do it using different tools than you used the first time to force yourself to be creative in your problem solving.

markschum
04-12-2008, 09:43 AM
watching tutorials is good but you need to play with the modeller so you dont have to thing so much on the commands .

the ones I use most are create box, create disk, bevel, multishift, extender, size, stretch, merge points , merge polys , divide, split, knife, drag. Also the commands to allocate a surface and possibly parts. Those simplify selections if you are working in one layer. Learn too how knife works with polygons selected or no selection. Oh, and cut, bandsaw, bandglue , rail extrude, make curve , draw spline and select loop . :D One tool at a time with its basic setting till you can use it, then extend into the options.

Make parts of things , like a knife blade or a handle , cups , saucers etc. If you can make all the parts then you can put it all together, and refine your technique.

Learn some of the shortcut keys . Spacebar to drop a tool and / to drop the selection saves time.

Many of the tutorials dont explain in enough detail for a beginner to understand WHY a particular tool or technique is used. The vids in the forum are excellent, and short, discus for the most part one tool .

Post a work you are doing or a sketch of what you want to do and people will help with it.

It may help you to customise the menus , so more of what you use are on the one tab , that saves a lot of time remembering what tab the command is on .

prospector
04-12-2008, 01:13 PM
Then build it again but try to do it using different tools than you used the first time to force yourself to be creative in your problem solving.

Yep, this is important

There are many ways in LW to accomplish the same thing.

Also you can come on my skype if you have a question or just wanna chat.
It's all LW all the time....mostly :D

dbigers
04-12-2008, 08:48 PM
Prospector made some very good points. It may seem daunting at first. When attempting to model "simple" things around the house you will discover that they arent as simple as they seem in some cases. But they are things you know very well and are easy to reference.

I believe the first thing I modeled that I really felt like I was making progress was a floppy disk. It took me awhile at first. Then I started over and I did it in a few minutes. Then I chose something more complex on my desk. I did this for a few weeks, it was something I looked forward to coming home from work each day. After a couple of weeks I had become quite comfortable with modeler and started relying on keyboard shortcuts. That is when my productivity really picked up.

I would still consider myself an average modeler at best, but I am able to model what I need for the projects I do.

Hang in there, if you try what Prospector suggested for a couple of weeks you might be surprised at how much easier it is to look at an object and then model it. But like others have said, modeling a car, human figures, etc. Well those things take good knowledge of the modeling tools and some really solid techniques. Something that no-one has right away, at least that I have met.

JamesCurtis
04-13-2008, 02:54 PM
Heck, to be honest, I've been doing 3D with LW since the first version on the Amiga Video Toaster [1990 I think], and I'm STILL learning, so don't feel bad. Take a breath, relax, and just be patient. It'll come to you!!

akstylish
04-13-2008, 09:05 PM
Thanks for the advice, everyone. :D I underestimated how much I need to practice. So I guess I'll start with a cup.

prospector
04-14-2008, 01:08 AM
I've been doing 3D with LW since the first version on the Amiga Video Toaster [1990 I think], and I'm STILL learning, so don't feel bad.

Me too, and everytime they come along and give us an update, I have to learn more.....:cursin:
Maby they can STOP releasing new stuff till I catch up.

prospector
04-14-2008, 01:09 AM
:ohmy::ohmy: NOT :ohmy::ohmy:

prospector
04-14-2008, 01:11 AM
akstylish
post results and we will guide you on the path of enlightenment

Or close to it:thumbsup:

rakker16mm
04-14-2008, 01:36 AM
Yeah definitely keep at it. It is a tough learning curve but it is very gratifying when you get past the steepest part.