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wacom
03-20-2008, 07:07 PM
Does anyone have a suggestion for a book or DVD on drawing hands methodically and well from memory/shapes? Most of my art training in the past was based solely on direct observation and drawing from that or at worst a photo.

I'm looking for something that demonstraits the structure and reasons the hand moves the way it does, but doesn't go into too many Leonardo diatribes etc. Something halfway between drawing for comics/illustration and fine arts focus?

I'd like something that maybe breaks the hand down into specific shapes...

If anyone also feels there are no good books...and its just best to draw from life and photos until it clicks then please say so too!

Thanks!

MachineClaw
03-20-2008, 07:17 PM
Drawing Dynamic Hands (Practical Art Books)
http://www.amazon.com/Drawing-Dynamic-Hands-Practical-Books/dp/0823013685/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1206062034&sr=1-1

Draw Real Hands! (Discover Drawing Series)
http://www.amazon.com/Draw-Real-Hands-Discover-Drawing/dp/0891348174/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1206062034&sr=1-2

The Book of a Hundred Hands (Paperback)
http://www.amazon.com/Book-Hundred-Hands-George-Bridgman/dp/048622709X/ref=sr_1_16?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1206062152&sr=1-16

All three are decent books with enough illustrations to keep ya buzy. Plus they are relatively cheap to buy and older so available at public libraries.

bluerider
03-20-2008, 09:44 PM
I recommend Bridgman's constructive anatomy.

Hes great at conveying a gestural overview plus the basic mechanics of how the joints articulate.

http://www.amazon.com/Constructive-anatomy-George-Brant-Bridgman/dp/B0007DSUG6

MachineClaw claw got a great link to Bridgman hand book above.

mattclary
03-21-2008, 10:51 AM
I always keep hand references... close at hand. ;) At arms length, one might say. ;) I eat, sleep, and bathe with my hand references. I go nowhere without them.

R.Feeney
03-21-2008, 12:12 PM
http://www.drawspace.com/lessons/lesson.php?id=h02
Drawspace.com has a lot of lessons, needs a free registration to view the lessons

Steamthrower
03-21-2008, 12:53 PM
I always keep hand references... close at hand. ;) At arms length, one might say. ;) I eat, sleep, and bathe with my hand references. I go nowhere without them.

Unfortunately my hand references were lost in a bus explosion three years ago. Since then, it's been terrible. I've tried various other references (in books, etc.) but drawing hands is never quite the same without my old references.

wacom
03-21-2008, 02:17 PM
Yes, I often use my own hands...the problem is that sometimes it's hard to get the right angle...or action (how do I draw my hand up against a wall with the fingers curling over the top from a birds eye angle)...and I don't carry a mirror around...and also...sometimes I'm not drawing human hands etc. I know this is the tried and true "observation" method...but I also like shortcuts where some master artist fills me in on a life of learning condensed into a few hundred pages.

If I were independently wealthy I guess I'd have a model around- my wife hates posing even her hands for very long!

The last year, seven years out of school, my art teachers sayings are finally NOT falling on deaf ears- "Good artist create, the best steal and make it their own."

We'll, I'm ready to start "learning" from others! When you start getting paid for drawing, any little tip that makes things faster/easier really helps.

Thanks bluerider, that book looks to be along the lines I'm looking for, and just the right amount beyond my level of skill so as to pull me forward without pushing me away (if that makes sense).

MachineClaw- I'll check out the Dynamic Hands one as well. I find is style over the top for my tastes, but there is no denying his skill level and ability to directly explain things.

bluerider
03-21-2008, 03:07 PM
I always keep hand references... close at hand. ;) At arms length, one might say. ;) I eat, sleep, and bathe with my hand references. I go nowhere without them.

Awareness of that reference I find comes in very handy

bluerider
03-21-2008, 03:10 PM
wacom=If I were independently wealthy I guess I'd have a model around-

----------------------------------

just make sure the model is very ugly

bluerider
03-21-2008, 03:13 PM
wacom=MachineClaw- I'll check out the Dynamic Hands one as well. I find is style over the top for my tastes, but there is no denying his skill level and ability to directly explain things.

-------------------

I love Hogarth,s drawing but I find it a little convoluted and hard to assimilate that type of copious style.

androidmaker
03-21-2008, 04:08 PM
http://www.dickblick.com/zz216/11/
http://www.dickblick.com/zz216/13/

JVitale
03-22-2008, 11:55 PM
when it comes to drawing for animation, this man is your Master Teacher...He has a plethora of teaching guides, DVDs and manuals...Everyone in the traditional animation industry knows this man and most have learned from him...check his section on ...hands

http://www.vilppustore.com/refcards.htm

He also teaches in Los Angeles...

"You know you have been doing this a long time when the students you had twenty years ago bring in their twenty-something year old children"---Glenn Vilppu

As soon as he uttered these words, a woman who worked as a Storyboard artist came into our class with her twenty-something year old son

xav
03-23-2008, 01:44 AM
Andrew Loomis books are great.
There no longer published but you can find some of them here.

http://www.artcone.com/forums/andrew_loomis_books_downloads-t1772.html