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starbase1
03-18-2008, 04:39 PM
I just heard that Arthur C Clarke died today. Very sad, a great source of inspiration to me, and one of the two great minds that produced the best SF film ever, by a country mile...

Nick

manholoz
03-18-2008, 04:45 PM
This is sad indeed.

bobakabob
03-18-2008, 04:57 PM
'2001' made nearly 40 years ago has never been equalled. I vividly recall seeing it totally awestruck, aged 16, it at a the Huddersfield Odeon one Saturday afternoon. Unlikely such a film could ever be made today. Only Tarkovsky's 'Solaris' comes close.

The other greats, 'Bladerunner' and 'Alien' are both indebted to it. Clarke and Kubrick's vision changed sci-fi on the big screen forever. Ridley Scott took up the mantle but he's since declared it a dead genre along with the western.

Drocket
03-18-2008, 05:03 PM
Very sad indeed :( I read an article about him not long ago.

starbase1
03-18-2008, 05:04 PM
It would be nice to think he maybe woke up and saw a monolith at the foot of his bed just before he died though...

Lightwolf
03-18-2008, 05:07 PM
:oye: It seems a lot of my heroes have been passing away recently...

Arthur C. Clarke was a giant...

Cheers,
Mike

tyrot
03-18-2008, 05:15 PM
dear arthur fans

he was unmatched....that is a sad sad news..

It was an honor to be mind-shaped by his books...for all these years...

starbase, I guess he said just before dying

"it's full of stars..."


Best

Captain Obvious
03-18-2008, 05:17 PM
Sad news indeed. I've always been a fan of his work.


:oye: It seems a lot of my heroes have been passing away recently...
Just as a guess: another one being Gygax?

Lightwolf
03-18-2008, 05:19 PM
Just as a guess: another one being Gygax?
Childhood hero, yes. But I was thinking of Joe Weizenbaum to be honest.

Cheers,
Mike

bobakabob
03-18-2008, 05:22 PM
It would be nice to think he maybe woke up and saw a monolith at the foot of his bed just before he died though...

A great way to go :D

mac
03-18-2008, 06:00 PM
a man way ahead of his time

wacom
03-18-2008, 07:43 PM
As far as I know, he had a wonderful 90 years of life, and in every interview I've seen with him over the years he was full of life and wonder.

At first I was sad, but he had done so many wonderful things I think its a good time to celebrate his life and all that came with it.

Does anyone remember the name of that show he did about paranormal activity etc. in the 70s? I was trying to remember the name of it today after I heard of his death from post-polio syndrome complications.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-polio_syndrome

jameswillmott
03-18-2008, 07:47 PM
Arthur C. Clarkes's Mysterious World?

wacom
03-18-2008, 07:50 PM
Childhood hero, yes. But I was thinking of Joe Weizenbaum to be honest.

Cheers,
Mike

I find it interesting that is public memorial in Germany was today! Correct?


Arthur C. Clarkes's Mysterious World?

If it had a rotating crystal skull from the (I think) Inca empire in the beginning then that's the one!

danielkaiser
03-18-2008, 07:51 PM
As far as I know, he had a wonderful 90 years of life, and in every interview I've seen with him over the years he was full of life and wonder.

At first I was sad, but he had done so many wonderful things I think its a good time to celebrate his life and all that came with it.

Does anyone remember the name of that show he did about paranormal activity etc. in the 70s? I was trying to remember the name of it today after I heard of his death from post-polio syndrome complications.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-polio_syndrome

Arthur C. Clarke's World of Strange Powers

geothefaust
03-18-2008, 07:52 PM
I know that show, my dad used to watch it all the time when I was growing up. But I can't remember the name.

I was thinking it was 'In Search Of', but that's the show Leonard Nimoy narrated.

Puguglybonehead
03-18-2008, 09:32 PM
One of my all time favorite authors. I am sad to see that he has passed on. I remember only a few months ago, watching his birthday broadcast, celebrating his "90th orbit of the sun". Inspiring man, he was.

Lightwolf
03-19-2008, 03:18 AM
I find it interesting that is public memorial in Germany was today! Correct?

Yesterday I suppose. Well, he has been living in Berlin for quite some time.

Cheers,
Mike

paul summers
03-19-2008, 03:24 AM
Very sad indeed

colkai
03-19-2008, 03:46 AM
Funny no new report I saw made mention of his contribution to geostationary satellite communications.
Even so, the man was a legend, 90 though, not bad innings at all, hope I get to reach that! :)

LW_Will
03-19-2008, 03:52 AM
Sad...

-EsHrA-
03-19-2008, 04:42 AM
his 90th birthday broadcast.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3qLdeEjdbWE

'its full of stars'... rip arthur.



mlon

inkpen3d
03-19-2008, 06:38 AM
Two things to be sad about: Firstly, the passing away of a great intellect, and secondly, that his inspiring visions of humanity's exploration and colonisation of space were never fully realised - mainly due to the short-sightedness of governments and their politicians.

Barred
03-19-2008, 06:46 AM
A loss of a great mind, may he rest in peace.

Rory Berger
03-19-2008, 06:52 AM
I'm surprised no one has mentioned his love for the Amiga. My friend said he saw a picture on broadcast TV today where they had blurred out his Amiga Fever sticker. I'm sure he would be none to happy for that. Truly one of mankinds greatest minds. Happy journeys.

starbase1
03-19-2008, 07:07 AM
I have been thinking much more on this today...

I think what truly made ACC unique was his ability to combine a spectacularly far sighted imagination that could conceive of things like floating life on Jupiter, flights to other planets (when few thought it was more than a fantasy), alien craft coming to investigate the solar system, god like beings shaping human evolution, and so many more with the hard headed realism to determine how it would have to happen in a credible manner.

I feel it was this combination of imagination and discipline that enabled him to see so very much further than the rest of us.

"overhead, without any fuss, the stars were going out."

Nick

Matt
03-19-2008, 08:04 AM
I remember his 'Mysterious World' series with fond memories, may he rest in peace.

robewil
03-19-2008, 10:01 AM
Although he was a self-proclaimed atheist, he was rather unique among science fiction writers in that he wrote stories about God. The Star is my favorite short story of all time. I first read it about 30 years ago and I still think about it from time to time.

waly
03-19-2008, 10:43 AM
R.I.P great Arthur Clarke

danielkaiser
03-19-2008, 10:51 AM
I have been thinking much more on this today...

I think what truly made ACC unique was his ability to combine a spectacularly far sighted imagination that could conceive of things like floating life on Jupiter, flights to other planets (when few thought it was more than a fantasy), alien craft coming to investigate the solar system, god like beings shaping human evolution, and so many more with the hard headed realism to determine how it would have to happen in a credible manner.

I feel it was this combination of imagination and discipline that enabled him to see so very much further than the rest of us.

"overhead, without any fuss, the stars were going out."

Nick


Fiction anchored in reality, that's why 2001 is Science Fiction and Star Wars is sci-fi.

http://mw1.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/science%20fiction

robewil
03-19-2008, 12:31 PM
Fiction anchored in reality, that's why 2001 is Science Fiction and Star Wars is sci-fi.Personally, I consider Star Wars in the genre of fantasy. There's no more science in Star Wars than there is in Lord of the Rings or The Sound of Music for that matter.

Signal to Noise
03-19-2008, 12:34 PM
It would be nice to think he maybe woke up and saw a monolith at the foot of his bed just before he died though...

He did and that's why Viagra is not recommended for 90 year olds! :D

RIP Mr. Clarke.

harlan
03-19-2008, 12:40 PM
HAA!!! That was too funny, Signal!

akademus
03-19-2008, 12:52 PM
I just hope his three wishes for 90th birthday will become reality soon. Especially one concerning our "addiction" to oil consumption.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3qLdeEjdbWE

World will be happier place without oil. Struggle for that energy resource is becoming more and more barbaric every year. And does look somewhat obsolete to use such a dirty and primitive energy resource.

rcomeau
03-19-2008, 07:44 PM
I had the honor to spend 15 min. one on one with Arthur C. Clarke back in 1969 and he is still an inspiration today. The man looked forward and saw the way it could be, good and bad.

zapper1998
03-19-2008, 08:27 PM
OMG
:cry:


The World will NOT be the same with out Him...

My favorite Author of all time...

He will be so missed at the boook store....

Michael

zapper1998
03-19-2008, 08:34 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_C._Clarke

.... A Day that That I will remember as a very sad day ....
michael
sorry had to add it...

bluerider
03-19-2008, 08:48 PM
He did and that's why Viagra is not recommended for 90 year olds! :D

RIP Mr. Clarke.

What you said was dreadfully insensitive and politically incorrect. :hey:

But as I am sometimes allergic to at least two of the conditions, I found your comment hilarious :D

rakker16mm
03-19-2008, 09:35 PM
Funny no new report I saw made mention of his contribution to geostationary satellite communications.
Even so, the man was a legend, 90 though, not bad innings at all, hope I get to reach that! :)

Yes I am also surprised by that. My step father, Dr. John R. Pierce was a good friend of Arthur C. Clarke and whenever his name came up in conversation he would always mention that the geostationary satellite was Arthur's idea.

danielkaiser
03-20-2008, 10:21 AM
"Sci-fi is a moron's neologism and Arthur hated it. He was a serious writer and a serious man, and when he wrote about the future, he took it seriously. He had very little patience for those who call it sci-fi. I suppose what passes for attention in the glare of his brilliance and erudition is the singular ability to extrapolate what our lives would be like down the line. He was not just a gentleman: He was an elegant and steadfast friend, a supporter of the arts and a gracious man, a quality that was in the bone and marrow of his demeanor. The passing of that graciousness from our common everyday life troubled him.

And he was steadfast. I met him when I was 18, your basic pencil-neck geek. In those days, he was still a youngish man and everyone referred to him as The Great Ego; he had to suffer that for decades. Arthur really did not like stupid people, but he would always talk to them as if they were Nobel laureates. I asked him where he got the patience, and he would answer that it's not nice to kick cripples.

Arthur and I were once talking about the responsibility of being an icon, how it's easy for people to take umbrage if you don't live up to their preformed concepts. It's hard to codify, without meaning to be self-serving, but we were discussing the burden of public identity. And he said that we are like two survivors of an oceanic flight who end up on a lost island, watching the tides go in and out. And we don't realize that time is passing and behind us there is a continent being built. Arthur became that continent, and he wore it with grace, aplomb and wisdom. He was a smart cookie."

Harlan Ellison.