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art
02-13-2008, 08:05 AM
I know, wrong forum but I feel more comfortable asking questions here and I am sure there will be at least one person who can help.

I just purchased my first ever guitar (electric). Now the question comes, how do I learn how to play this thing. This is just for fun, I have no plans for becoming a pro musician, being in a band, etc.

Is it possible to learn playing on my own or should I definetely go for some training? I have some basic understanding of the music theory etc, but not much beyond that.

I do not want to go for a personal training, but I've found a few training packages on the internet. I'm kind of interested in this (http://www.learnandmasterguitar.com/) and it has decent reviews. I am not sure if I should start with free resources available (also plenty of those) or if I should go for something commercial. Any ideas and tips for a novice?

Steamthrower
02-13-2008, 08:24 AM
I played around on an acoustic for several years. I tried different books and watched a few mini-tuts on the internet. I couldn't do more than play your simple G and D strums. Then I decided that I really wanted to get into it. So I began taking lessons from a professor of guitar at the local university...and that was amazing.

Maybe it helped knowing music theory and knowing how to play the piano, but seriously having a professional musician working directly with me was the biggest boon I ever had. My teacher taught me to play fingerstyle classical more than anything, but since then I've began to play a lot of rock and knowing fingerstyle helps tremendously when doing solos.

Of course if right off you want to sound just like some band, you can do it. All you do is tune your top string down to D and turn up the drive and barre your finger and slide it and scream and presto! you're My Chemical Romance. :D

What guitar/amp do you have? And do you know any other instruments?

Lito
02-13-2008, 08:40 AM
Well I learned guitar by myself using Tab files from the internet :).

Though I now know there is an even easier way to learn guitar from:
http://video-tabs.com/

There are free video lessons there and also links to how to play many songs.

IMO you need to first learn chords. You don't need to learn them all but the basic (A,B,C,D,E,F,G) chords are a must. And I highly recommend the Fretboard Logic series of books (vol 1-3) once you can play those chords. This series of books are the absolute IMO greatest for learning how the fretboard on the guitar is setup. It'll also help you learn and remember scales.

http://www.amazon.com/Fretboard-Logic-Volumes-Videos-Combined/dp/1893884058/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1202916457&sr=8-2

I only own the first book in the series, but I plan on buying that full set soon.

art
02-13-2008, 08:42 AM
I bought a jumpstart kit from ibanez. It comes with a 15 watt amp. I know, a personal teacher would be the best, but I probably do not have enough money for that right now and the time I can commit to this will probably vary. Supposedely the aforementioned training is the next best thing, but who knows.
While my musical interests lean toward heavier sounds it is definetely not the only style I'd like to learn.

I played some keyboards (also self taught) but I am not particularly brilliant at that either :)

Steamthrower
02-13-2008, 08:44 AM
If you like heavier stuff then you need to learn some Flyleaf. They have some great heavy riffs, and the solos (on songs like So I Thought) are pretty easy to learn as well.

Of course, www.ultimate-guitar.com is the only place to get tabs for songs like that since they're based in the Netherlands.

wp_capozzi
02-13-2008, 08:56 AM
Much of learning an instrument depends on your want and will and predisposition. Everyone is different. If you have a musical background or a good ear for picking out tunes, that can go a long way.
Those look like decent learning materials. You might not get nearly that amount of information if you took live lessons adding up to that same price. It is good to have someone to sit with and answer questions on occasion though. 2 or 3 live lessons down the road might be a good thing.
Playing for fun will count for a lot. Having a goal, like learning a few favorite songs can keep interest flowing. One of the first deterrents to playing guitar is sore fingertips. Once you get past that, all is good.

Best regards,
Bill C.

Steamthrower
02-13-2008, 09:02 AM
I'd like to echo what Bill just said and say that even if you can grab maybe two single hour-long lessons with a good guitarist, that'll do you more good than a whole book/DVD of training materials. A live person will see what mistakes you're making and won't teach you redundant things that you already know.

art
02-13-2008, 09:02 AM
Thank for info guys. What about the actual techniques of playing, chord progressions, playing individual notes, damping strings, etc? Does that come mainly from practice, practice, practice? So far I could not find too much info on that. With my rather thick fingers on the fretboard I feel like an elephant in a very small porcelain shop. Is that normal for beginners?

art
02-13-2008, 09:10 AM
Regarding a live trainer, I'll see what's available in my area. Maybe a few lessons won't hurt.

This my my post #999!

archijam
02-13-2008, 09:12 AM
If I may chime in on this thread ...

.. with the rapid expansion of YouTube and it's many b'tard children, I had imagined that there woulod be a wealth of such video lessons/tutes/tips.

Does anyone have any good links? (Maybe silkrooster will make a pdf ;) ? :D)

Oh and Bass guitar resources too! just dusted her off after many years of neglect (and put a new battery in the active pickups) ...

Cheers!

j.

Steamthrower
02-13-2008, 09:17 AM
My fingers are pretty thin (some people would use the term bony :D) so I can't speak from experience there, but one of the best guitar players I know has these beefy thick fingers that look like German sausages. So I doubt it'll be much of a problem.

I'd say techniques like "individual notes playing" - I'm assuming you mean a single-note solo - isn't actually that much about practice as it is knowing which fingers to use. That's a trick that I haven't fully mastered yet, and I usually end up at the end with a twisted conglomeration of fingernails and fingertips doing some gang sign on the fretboard. From what I know, the best way to learn how to finger smoothly is to play scales over and over again. And USE THAT PINKIE! When I started it killed me to use it (because I was using heavy strings) but it's amazing how strong it'll grow. It still kills me doing a hammer-on or pull-off with a pinkie.

With chord progressions...depends on what music you're playing...with most rock you'll use a lot of I - IV - V progressions. But it all depends.

Steamthrower
02-13-2008, 09:20 AM
By the way, for video tutorials - I know this seems retarded but this link helped me out tremendously...actually the first time I was ever able to play Carry On Wayward Son and actually have it sound good...how to play Guitar Hero songs on electric guitar...

http://www.expertvillage.com/video-series/3276_shred-guitar-hero.htm

art
02-13-2008, 09:32 AM
...one of the best guitar players I know has these beefy thick fingers that look like German sausages...
Thanks, I feel much better now :)

UnCommonGrafx
02-13-2008, 10:25 AM
Wow, what a timely thread.

Last night was my second night of Guitar lessons. The wife looked at the local college extensions/adult education classes and found me a perfect Christmas gift: guitar lessons.

I had been trying to teach myself for the past two years. Noise was the best I could do. ;) The teacher has benefitted me because on the first day he taught us a little lick that was easy enough to play and made me feel like I could make music.
Chords... sigh... bought books on them ... books from the library... made no difference: a chord played on its own is just a sound. The teacher has already shown us how chords interact with each other and got us to realize that transitioning from chord to chord wouldn't be so bad.


In all my readings, no one talked about a "walking bass". Last night, I was shown this and so many questions were answered.

Good luck with your lessons. Learning on your own isn't so bad if you really invest the time. But an instructor will take all that self-learning and magnify it by 5+ in its worthiness to you.

bobakabob
02-13-2008, 12:02 PM
Art,

Good luck learning. Below is some advice, hope it's useful. Still learning myself 20 years later... Learnt a lot making lots of mistakes along the way and playing with my bro' who's better than me (hate him for it). Feel free to download MP3s of our music.

:jam: Persevere. Unless you're blessed with supernatural talent the initial sounds you make may sound like a cat being strangled. The physical aches pains and callouses are to be welcomed, evidence you're putting the hours in. Avoid the temptation to throw your guitar out of the window or spending hours drooling over guitar mags and thinking your instrument's holding you back and you need to spend thousands on the right plank with a fancy brand name.

Spend a few dollars getting your guitar set up by a tech - straight off the production line guitars can have actions like cheese graters and fretboards like bananas.

Learn to do simple things well. Most blues songs consist of 3 - 4 basic chords. A lot of guitarists aim to play a million notes a second but BB King can blow the poodles away with a single note solo.

:jam: Keep effects pedals to the bare minimum (at first), they can be too much of a distraction. If you can 'tame' the sound of your guitar plugged directly into your amp you're on your way. Listen to Robert Cray on Strong Persuader - minimal effects, clean sound yet awesome blues. Once you can play clean treat yourself to some distortion and delay pedals.

Adrian Belew once said he played his guitar like a drum. Great advice for developing rhythm. If you hate the sound unplug or stick a t-shirt down the back of the bridge - good technique to hear what you're really playing. Don't be afraid to bash your instrument like a madman to work on your your coordination and stamina. A metronome / beatbox is a great investment. Bob Dylan is a severely underrated rhythm player. Give 'Hard Rain' and 'All Along the Watchtower' a spin.

Form a band - definitely the ultimate advice

:jam: As archijam suggested there are loads of tutorials of varying quality on Youtube. Not sure of your taste but learning riffs by George Harrison, Hendrix, Johnny Marr, Keith Richards, Brian May, Mick Ronson, Jeff Beck (and Beck!) Ryan Adams, Dave Gilmour, BB King, Clapton will take you in all kinds of interesting directions. Make sure to spend time away from CDs and Youtube to carve out your own riffs.

Then there's the world of alternate tunings - dropped D, Open G, DADGAD. The gods are Joni Mitchell, John Martyn, Nick Drake, Roy Harper.

Cheers:D

hunter
02-13-2008, 04:36 PM
Largely taught myself by ear, but knowing music theory is invaluable. Take the time to learn music, it will payoff in more ways than just playing guitar. Don't give up on it even after your fingertips turn to hamburger after the first few days of playing. They'll toughen up. :thumbsup:

Also this is a cool site:

http://www.ivideosongs.com/

Here's a little tune I did when I got my dream guitar in September last year.

http://www.greatfallingoftheleaves.com/summers_end.mp3

Puguglybonehead
02-13-2008, 05:45 PM
Art, you made a good choice with the Ibanez jumpstart kit. :thumbsup: Ibanez make great guitars! Having a good quality instrument to learn on will make all the difference. As for how to go about learning? There are so many different ways to approach it, just go with what feels right.

I started with a cheezy department store special (in the early 1970s, it was a single-pickup Raven), but it did the trick. I played by ear for the first year or 2. I actually started out playing slide, before I started to learn how to play the frets.

Then I got a book called "Improvising Rock Guitar". It was the most effective instruction that I ever had. It came with a flexi-disc (a thin vinyl 33-RPM analog audio-record) that had samples from all the lessons, plus a couple of instrumentals to play along with. Great book. Started out with simple blues scales, and finished off with teaching some really tasty lead-guitar work and a section on how to improvise your own guitar solos.

Besides that, I learned by playing along with TV commercial jingles, and learning whatever Alice Cooper or Black Sabbath I could pick up. "Paranoid" was a good choice. Actually, the first song I ever learned was Alice Cooper's "The Ballad Of Dwight Frye" (from "Love It To Death"). By the time I was adept at this stuff, the Punk scene was starting here, and my style fit right in. :D

I actually didn't start seeing a 'guitar coach' (he prefered that, to being called a 'teacher') until I had been playing for 10 years. He helped me to discard some bad habits, and use my fingers more efficiently. So, really, going to an instructor is just as valid an approach as the self-taught route is. Your choice.

Learning scales, modes, and most importantly chords, is what you should do first. Then some basic songs (ones that you actually like). Once you feel confident, then you should seek out others, who are at roughly the same level as you are in playing. Jamming together is a great way to learn, and also a helluva lotta fun! :D

Hopper
02-13-2008, 06:18 PM
...From what I know, the best way to learn how to finger smoothly is to play scales over and over again. And USE THAT PINKIE! When I started it killed me to use it (because I was using heavy strings) but it's amazing how strong it'll grow....
Man, you just can't stress that enough. Seriously, I used to think.. "yup .. got it .. next." and didn't really get it. Being accurate and going slow for as long as it takes is SOOOOO important. Everyone wants to be SRV (or insert your favorite rock star here) overnight but it just doesn't happen unless your some sort of child prodigy or idiot savant. I've been playing for almost 20 years now and still consider my self as amateur at best because like you, I play for fun. If it sounds good to you, then it's music.

Oh .. and as for the "big fingers thing". Both Stevie Ray Vaughn and Robin Trower both have giant ham hands and horrible hand posture. It obviously didn't make much of a difference. :)

And for on line lessons, I recommend www.justinguitar.com for just the basics. I wouldn't go any further than his introductory lessons, but the first ones are good and he is correct in his teachings.

Hopper
02-13-2008, 09:58 PM
And one last note... for Pete's sake, get a metronome or download one. Doing scales and fingering shapes with one makes you infinately smoother after time.

archijam
02-14-2008, 01:22 AM
And one last note... for Pete's sake, get a metronome or download one. Doing scales and fingering shapes with one makes you infinately smoother after time.

That's a great tip! I was thinking of using the Cubase 'blips' ;) ... !

j.

Surrealist.
02-14-2008, 03:05 AM
Definitely going to have to pain your way through the callus stage. I have to do it every time I put the old thing down for a few months. Ouch.

Regarding your finger strength, it will just come in time. It's not just the fingers it is the whole hand - which ever one is on the frets. A good teacher can help you with hand position so you are not muting the strings you want to ring. Finger strength comes in when you have to press down on the strings to make the chords and hand strength comes in when you have to hold it in position while doing so. It is all happening at the same time. But you do really need that first lesson or two to get the hand technique together so you can at least be doing it right instead of practicing bad habits.

Over all take it slow and enjoy you new hobby. :)

IMI
02-14-2008, 03:16 AM
I can tell you one thing to definitely avoid - strain. Seriously, if you intend on learning fast single line passages for soloing, arpeggios, doublestops and all these things that can kill your fingers, try at least to learn how to do it the "right" way, with your thumb behind the neck.
I've been playing for about 28 years, but in the mid 90's had to completely stop for about a year, because I was on the verge of destroying my fingers. I actually thought I had arthritis, but it was severe carpal tunnel.
That came from learning all these Yngwie Malmsteen and Steve Vai licks and playing them over and over, faster and faster, while forcing my fingers to do things they weren't meant to do. I had a real bad "form" if you want to call it that, but was able to play the stuff anyway, but it took its toll.
Like I said, got to the point of not being able to play at all, and had to quit to heal, and then I had to relearn how to do it all correctly, so as not to cause damage.
There are alot of people who will say it doesn't matter at all if you do it right with your thumb behind the neck, and they're right - for being able to play solos, it doesn't matter. But for doing it for hours on end, over many years, it can matter alot. I still have a noticeable numbness in my left pinky finger, which will probably never go away.

colkai
02-14-2008, 03:41 AM
I know, wrong forum but I feel more comfortable asking questions here and I am sure there will be at least one person who can help.

I just purchased my first ever guitar (electric). Now the question comes, how do I learn how to play this thing. This is just for fun, I have no plans for becoming a pro musician, being in a band, etc.

Is it possible to learn playing on my own or should I definetely go for some training? I have some basic understanding of the music theory etc, but not much beyond that.

I learned purely on my own.
That said, jamming with others will boost your skills as well as the enjoyment factor.

In terms of software learning, I am a big fan of Guitar Pro, it is very useful for learning songs as you can control tempo and see both the guitar fretboard and the tabsheet.
http://www.guitar-pro.com/en/index.php

For the price, I think it's excellent

If your guitar isn't "high end" (some of mine aren't), then pay to have it professionally set up.
I have a Richwood RE125 which, after 35 quid paid to a luthier, turned it from A "plank" to a really nice guitar.

Luckily my other guitars are craftsman custom pieces from way back in the day, still hold their tune solidly 20 years on!

meshpig
02-14-2008, 05:11 AM
I know, wrong forum but I feel more comfortable asking questions here and I am sure there will be at least one person who can help.

I just purchased my first ever guitar (electric). Now the question comes, how do I learn how to play this thing. This is just for fun, I have no plans for becoming a pro musician, being in a band, etc.

Is it possible to learn playing on my own or should I definetely go for some training? I have some basic understanding of the music theory etc, but not much beyond that.

I do not want to go for a personal training, but I've found a few training packages on the internet. I'm kind of interested in this (http://www.learnandmasterguitar.com/) and it has decent reviews. I am not sure if I should start with free resources available (also plenty of those) or if I should go for something commercial. Any ideas and tips for a novice?


All I can say is I hope you bought the right one for your hands? It makes a difference... ie. if you have long and slender hands go for the Fender type, if you have shorter stockier hands (like me) go for the mighty Les Paul.

Simple reason being that you'll have trouble working a Strat with stocky hands and the wider necked Gibson needs a bit of force to get them going.

The rest is listening to all sorts of guitar music.

-Some obscure guitar dudes:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ritchie_Blackmore

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Hillage

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Django_Reinhardt


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pat_Metheny


What you have to do with every musical instrument is practice, practice, practice...! Fact, it gets you there. Remember to include your other hand because most just focus on the frets then wonder what the F.


m:)

colkai
02-14-2008, 07:11 AM
As for FX pedals, I used to have a full BOSS range, plus a few others.
Hard times meant hard choices.
Now, although it's "low end", I use a Zoom G2
http://www.zoom.co.jp/english/products/g2/

It has a built in metronome, tuner and a great range of adjustable sounds. As I now only have a "pignose" amp, I use the G2 with headphones, still get's a great sound and is great for learning as it doesn't p%$$ off your other half / family. ;)

One thing, don't fall into the the "overdrive == good" trap, if it sounds good played on the guitar with no amp / fx, it will sound much better with it. :)

Steamthrower
02-14-2008, 07:22 AM
One thing, don't fall into the the "overdrive == good" trap, if it sounds good played on the guitar with no amp / fx, it will sound much better with it. :)

Good point there. I know folks who only play electric guitars with overdrive and flange and wah pedals...and when they come over and test out the Taylor acoustic it sounds like they're strangling a kitten...like Max users...

RollerJesus
02-14-2008, 07:46 AM
One thing, don't fall into the the "overdrive == good" trap, if it sounds good played on the guitar with no amp / fx, it will sound much better with it.

Best part about that is the double == signs... Making sure he not only doesn't come to rely on distortion to hide lack of skills, but also doesn't assign the value "good" to the variable "overdrive".

I suck at programmer humor, but this has been an interesting thread.

I'm no virtuouso on the guitar, but I do a lot of recording for a lot of different types of musicians and I've found the one's who are technically good players, practice mainly on an acoustic, then moving to the electric is gloss.

colkai
02-14-2008, 08:16 AM
Best part about that is the double == signs... Making sure he not only doesn't come to rely on distortion to hide lack of skills, but also doesn't assign the value "good" to the variable "overdrive".

Ah me,
Yup, that's what comes of 28 years in the coding game. :p

art
02-14-2008, 08:27 AM
So many posts overnight. Thanks for many good points and reassuring words.
As far as "overdrive != good" goes, I understand completely. Plus, almost every beginner tutorial out there seems to start with clean sounds. I hope it is not neccesary for me to get another guitar, accoustic this time. My wife would kick me out of the house, along with my guitars. Will it be good enough to start on electric with no distortion/effects applied?

I hope that this thread will be useful for anyone who starts playing gutar.

ericsmith
02-14-2008, 08:48 AM
I definitely agree with the thought of learning to play clean with no effects, but here's one counterpoint.

Practicing with heavy distortion can push you to be more precise. For chords, it will force you to strum just the right strings with just the right force. To much and you get mush. The same is basically true with scales. If you're a bit sloppy without distortion, you won't really notice. But with full distortion, every little slip up is magnified, and you can better hear just how well you're making contact with the string (both finger and pick), as well as if you're accidentally hitting strings outside of the one you intend.

Eric

Steamthrower
02-14-2008, 08:50 AM
Will it be good enough to start on electric with no distortion/effects applied?

I hope that this thread will be useful for anyone who starts playing gutar.

1) Depends on the guitar. I've played some that sound dull and flat and some that sound great.

2) I always think it's cool to see how often computer guys play guitar. I'm sure lots of folks will find this helpful. Me included.

colkai
02-14-2008, 08:53 AM
Will it be good enough to start on electric with no distortion/effects applied?
Oh for sure.
As I say, I normally play via the Zoom set to a nice clean sound, or even not amplified at all times, just for a qucik "run through". However, it's much nicer playing to a nice sound so I'd advocate that. :)

Steamthrower
02-14-2008, 08:57 AM
Learn to play Bach's Prelude to Ave Maria with a clean sound, then turn up that crunch and drive...:D

JGary
02-14-2008, 09:27 AM
I started out playing electric (for fun, self taught), then had just a acoustic for many years, and have recently returned to owning a electric. When I had a electric years ago (1990ish), I spent a lot of money on effects, amps and pedals trying to get a good sound. This time around, I decided to bypass the whole amp/ pedal thing and bought a Line 6 Guitar Port and have been thoroughly amazed by what it can do.

http://line6.com/guitarport/

It's a very small piece of hardware that lets you plug your guitar into the computer and has software that runs the effects/amps. Cheap and sounds incredible. It comes with many preset guitar tones that you can customize...or you can access a website with many artist specific tones.

RollerJesus
02-14-2008, 09:33 AM
I completely agree that learning an electric is just fine, and quite an enjoyable experience too. My point was that the higher action, heavier strings and distortion free acoustic guitar is generally harder for the novice to play. When you get frustrated pick up an electric and it will feel so nice and soft, low action, you have a little more slack in strumming, etc.

Most important, stick with it when it gets frustrating and try to paly everyday, even if it's just for 5 minutes.

Steamthrower
02-14-2008, 09:34 AM
Yeah - seriously check out Line 6 digital products. They don't sound as good as tubes (some say) but the stuff you can get out of them is pretty amazing.

Lito
02-14-2008, 09:42 AM
Just FYI, all line6 products have 0 drivers for 64bit OSes. I love their products but at the moment if you're running 64bit XP or Vista you won't really be able to take advantage of their products.

JGary
02-14-2008, 09:44 AM
Just FYI, all line6 products have 0 drivers for 64bit OSes. I love their products but at the moment if you're running 64bit XP or Vista you won't really be able to take advantage of their products.


Did not realize that. I have a 64 bit Workstation, but have my Line 6 software installed on my extra render station and laptop (both 32 bit). Good to know.

They also have the pod products, which plug into a amp and use the same sound processing, but I really like being able to plug into the computer and bypassing a amp....really cool when I use the laptop and output the sound into my home theater setup on 7 channel stereo.

hunter
02-14-2008, 09:55 AM
So many posts overnight. Thanks for many good points and reassuring words.
As far as "overdrive != good" goes, I understand completely. Plus, almost every beginner tutorial out there seems to start with clean sounds. I hope it is not neccesary for me to get another guitar, accoustic this time. My wife would kick me out of the house, along with my guitars. Will it be good enough to start on electric with no distortion/effects applied?

I hope that this thread will be useful for anyone who starts playing gutar.

It doesn't matter. Just play. Sitting in front of the TV practice scales without the thing even plugged in.Don't get bogged down in this guitar or that guitar at this point. Just play as often as you can.
You know the greats SRV, Jimi, David Gilmour, They could take the lousiest POS Acoustic or electric and make it sing. As so often quoted here in these forums "It's the artist not the tools."
That said when you get better you'll want a nicer guitar. You see if you can have your guitar set-up professionally, or learn to do it yourself to get the lowest action without buzzing frets. That, and the tone of the pickups is where you really notice a difference between low end and high end guitars.
Just play. Keep playing. hey, don't stop. Pick up that guitar and play...








You still here?
Go PLAY! :D

Surrealist.
02-14-2008, 10:46 AM
Wow interesting thread. So many guitar-playing LWers. :lightwave

First instrument I started playing when I was seven. My oldest sister showed me where to put my hand and my thumb and my first few chords. She learned that from a teacher no doubt.

Good luck and rock on.

meshpig
02-15-2008, 04:40 AM
You're all gonna laugh at this but I used to play a pretty mean guitar years ago (i find the sounds too predictable these days) , just have an nice Ibanez now for when I/we feel like singing marvin gaye renditions...

Um, here goes. Just saying you can get a guitar happening on a keyboard without too much effort using something as dumb as garage band.

m
54761

colkai
02-15-2008, 05:41 AM
ok, now I'm gonna have to dig out some of my old stuff too! ;)

meshpig
02-15-2008, 06:15 AM
ok, now I'm gonna have to dig out some of my old stuff too! ;)


Cool! Digital only though... no youtube of a strummed arpeggio orgasm please!

m

Steamthrower
02-15-2008, 06:36 AM
You're all gonna laugh at this but I used to play a pretty mean guitar years ago (i find the sounds too predictable these days) , just have an nice Ibanez now for when I/we feel like singing marvin gaye renditions...

Um, here goes. Just saying you can get a guitar happening on a keyboard without too much effort using something as dumb as garage band.

m
54761

Pretty nice little recording!

Hopper
02-15-2008, 08:26 AM
-Some obscure guitar dudes:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ritchie_Blackmore

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Hillage

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Django_Reinhardt


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pat_Metheny
Obscure? Oh no ... are we that old already?


..and when they come over and test out the Taylor acoustic it sounds like they're strangling a kitten...
You let people touch your Taylor? :twak: lol


I can tell you one thing to definitely avoid - strain.
And I so wish someone would have told me that years back. I'm having issues with it now. It blows. This is also why most beginner lessons are recommended to be only 30 minutes or so. But like the bonehead that I am, I never took lessons and now I'm paying for it with sore hands and bad habits I can't break.

* Best guitar stretching excercise ever invented:

Opening phrase of "Message In A Bottle" - Andy Summers (The Police)

If you can play it for 3 minutes straight... impressive.

UnCommonGrafx
02-15-2008, 08:35 AM
Meshpig,
Nice sounds.

Steamthrower
02-15-2008, 08:46 AM
Message in the Bottle - one of my all time favorites. Only a little less good than Invisible Sun. Or Spirits In A Material World. Or King of Pain. Or...the list goes on...

meshpig
02-15-2008, 08:53 AM
Obscure? Oh no ... are we that old already?

.

Afraid so, like when Teenagers start lecturing you about how cool the f***ing Beach Boys are...

m

archijam
02-15-2008, 08:53 AM
Just ordered a Line 6 Pocket Pod (Eveything else was soo pricey outside the US) ..

Please noone tell me I made the wrong choice .. will mostly be used with a bass.

j.

Steamthrower
02-15-2008, 08:59 AM
No, you didn't. I've had people tell me those are pretty amazing. You can use them to route into a big 500w amp and blast away sinners almost as loud as the man upstairs.

archijam
02-15-2008, 09:04 AM
Nice-a!

Thanks inigo07, that's good to hear.

I did 'research', but only since post #34 of this thread ;)

j.

Hopper
02-15-2008, 09:07 AM
Please noone tell me I made the wrong choice ..
Good choice.

Feel better now? :)

I have a POD XT and an XT Live. I like both for tinkering with odd effects and making the guitar sound like it's NOT supposed to. Good products. Solid.

What's everyone else using these days? Favorite effects? Interesting setups?

For regular playing, I keep it simple and go through a couple of Fulltone boxes. Clyde Wah -> DejaVibe2 -> OCD (or SoulBender) ->amp.

Then for the wierd stuff:
Boss CS3 comp -> PodXT Live -> Boss Space Echo -> Boss RC50 LoopStation ->amp

Maybe we should start a new LW Guitarists forum section. :hey: Would be fun.

colkai
02-15-2008, 09:46 AM
Ok, here we go, some of my older stuff, pretty varied.
S'all me, sequence, drum programming, keyboards, ( bass is a GI-10 / GK2 on my Destroyer).
Guitars 'live', mixture of my Redshift, acoustic, Destroyer.

Steamthrower
02-15-2008, 09:50 AM
Maybe we should start a new LW Guitarists forum section. Would be fun.
Support the instigation of a LW Guitarists Subforum! Rate this thread high and post till your fingernails drop off!

BTW: My avatar is entirely modeled, textured, and rendered in Lightwave.

Hopper
02-15-2008, 10:20 AM
BTW: My avatar is entirely modeled, textured, and rendered in Lightwave.
I thought about using the guitar model that was on the LightWave v9 Texturing CD, but since it wasn't mine, I thought that would be pretty cheesy of me.

I really like the sound clips. It's fun to noodle around and find a good riff isn't it. All the stuff I record winds up being just the intro or a quick riff just so I can remember it later! lol.

IMI
02-15-2008, 07:17 PM
What's everyone else using these days? Favorite effects? Interesting setups?


years and years of trying all the effects from distortion, to flanging to wah to echo, and then the Alesis qudroverb, then the DOD effects boards, so on and so on and so on....
Now, I just plug my Jackson into this old Marshall 100 watt head I bought a few weeks ago (at a garage sale!) and crank it up. Sometimes I add a vintage crybaby. :jam:

Hopper
02-15-2008, 07:31 PM
years and years of trying all the effects from distortion, to flanging to wah to echo, and then the Alesis qudroverb, then the DOD effects boards, so on and so on and so on....
Now, I just plug my Jackson into this old Marshall 100 watt head I bought a few weeks ago (at a garage sale!) and crank it up. Sometimes I add a vintage crybaby. :jam:
Oh the beloved QuadraVerb. I still have mine and use it exclusively for reverb. When it dies, I will be quite sad. After finally getting a good mixer, I could use it on multiple tracks at once without getting phase distortion or cancellations. The thing is still amazing to me.

Hmmm .. I was going to model a bit but .. nahhhh time to play!

IMI
02-15-2008, 07:41 PM
My quadraverb was destroyed in hurricane Charley a few years ago, actually, along with alot of other old electronic stuff I had in storage at the time. Water damage from when the roof got partially ripped off.
Sad, sad day that was, I can tell you!

meshpig
02-15-2008, 11:30 PM
Ok, here we go, some of my older stuff, pretty varied.
S'all me, sequence, drum programming, keyboards, ( bass is a GI-10 / GK2 on my Destroyer).
Guitars 'live', mixture of my Redshift, acoustic, Destroyer.

Thanx for that. Ah, real guitars! Leads, jacks , pedals, amps, mixers, power boards, mike stands, speakers... gaffer tape!!

-I just have a basic touch sensitive keyboard with a mod wheel, garageband and a few minor mixing apps. I had Reason on OS 9 but unless you spend a small fortune it all sounds like sh!t to me.

On the other hand all that equipment...?

m

bobakabob
02-16-2008, 04:08 AM
Well produced and some great bluesy slide work there Colkai. :hey:

colkai
02-16-2008, 07:06 AM
Ta!, not on there is any acuostic, but I do play a lot on my lovely TangleWood semi-acoustic.
Also got an old EKO jumbo - but a car accident means too long on that with my arm draped over the huge body gives me a sore shoulder, (thus my reason for buying the Tanglewood :) )

Strangely, I spend a lot of time plinking about on my Richwood rather than my other 'proper' guitars. Mainly because it's just left lying around so is in easy reach. I love my others too much to leave them out of their flight cases for too long if they aren't being used. :D

Sold a LOT of stuff the past year or so, got rid of a couple of guitars, keyboards, 8-track and more - bills had to be paid.

Of course, my main guitars are not up for debate, I fully intend to be torched with my trusty Destroyer lying alongside me!

colkai
02-16-2008, 07:08 AM
* Best guitar stretching excercise ever invented:

Opening phrase of "Message In A Bottle" - Andy Summers (The Police)

Another nice one is 'every breath you take' - good for making those joints hurt! :p

hunter
02-16-2008, 09:56 AM
Another nice one is 'every breath you take' - good for making those joints hurt! :p
yup. He loves those sus2 or add9 chords, painful as they are.

IMI
02-16-2008, 10:30 AM
Stretching exercises?
Learn Paganini's 24 caprices on guitar and see if that doesn't add half an inch to your fingers. :jam:
Steve Vai arranged them first, I believe. The man's got the hands of an extraterrestrial alien. ;)

IMI
02-16-2008, 12:34 PM
Finally got around to it.. that is some pretty nice, mellow stuff, colkai. :)

Hopper
02-16-2008, 02:36 PM
Played a bit last night and wanted to load up some old recordings. It's too bad I had forgotten about the drive crash I had about 6 months ago. Fortunately I made backups! But unfortunately...(*pauses for an exasperated sigh*), I never labeled the DVD and now I can't find it. Doh! :bangwall:

I did however find one I began working on about 3 months ago for a project a friend of mine was doing. I cut it short after I realized my guitar was completely out of tune and didn't match up with the synth. We decided to start over using his studio and a 12 string instead. The guitar I was using was crap (my beater) and sounded too "tinny".

Anyway, I'll post it when I get home. Anyone else have a few samples? :)

Hopper
02-16-2008, 05:01 PM
Ok... here it is. This has no compression or normalization, so you'll probably have to crank up the volume. We moved the project to another system, so there's no post processing, etc...

Done with a 25 year old Alvarez (my beater), AT3035 Audio-technica mic, Yamaha Motif 6 synth, Alesis QuadraVerb, Nuendo (multitrack software).

All in all, this was done in about 30 minutes... so don't laugh too hard.

You'll also notice how out of tune the guitar is by the last note... makes me cringe every time I hear it.

hunter
02-17-2008, 10:53 AM
Ok... here it is. This has no compression or normalization, so you'll probably have to crank up the volume. We moved the project to another system, so there's no post processing, etc...

Done with a 25 year old Alvarez (my beater), AT3035 Audio-technica mic, Yamaha Motif 6 synth, Alesis QuadraVerb, Nuendo (multitrack software).

All in all, this was done in about 30 minutes... so don't laugh too hard.

You'll also notice how out of tune the guitar is by the last note... makes me cringe every time I hear it.
Very pretty. Love the harmonics. Need a longer version though. :thumbsup:

Silkrooster
02-17-2008, 10:09 PM
Glad to see so many into music, especially guitars. I started 30+ years ago and only learned enough to be dangerous. lol.
Silk

archijam
02-18-2008, 02:10 AM
Glad to see so many into music, especially guitars. I started 30+ years ago and only learned enough to be dangerous. lol.
Silk

Guitar PDF! Guitar PDF !

;)

j.

bobakabob
02-18-2008, 06:37 AM
It would be nice to see some 3D Lightwave guitar pics. Anyone got any cool 3D Gibson or Fender renders? :D

Steamthrower
02-18-2008, 06:53 AM
I've got a Fender render but if it's sized any larger than 100px it looks pretty darn crappy.