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View Full Version : Brilliant reference for freelancers/SOHO workers



Bog
02-11-2008, 05:00 PM
I recall a few threads here about the financial vagiaries of freelancing, and generally being an artist for a living. This is a blog-post by John Scalzi, who is an author not an animator, but everything he says is appropriate and valuable. I ask everyone to read it, as it ought to be handed out with bank accounts and printed on the inside of company name registration forms.

Very Sensible Writing. Fun, too. (http://scalzi.com/whatever/?p=362)

Simply substitute "Animator" for "Writer" where appropriate.

eagleeyed
02-11-2008, 05:02 PM
Thanks for the link, I have just briefly read it, but it is a very, very valuable thing, will read it in full in about 30 mins when I have the time.

Thanks again.

Andyjaggy
02-11-2008, 05:06 PM
Good find.

Bog
02-11-2008, 05:07 PM
I'm particularly fond of:

6. Don’t have the cash for it? You can’t have it.

and

7. When you do buy something, buy the best you can afford — and then run it into the ground.

This is Oh My Gh0d so appropos for us lot, who frequently have to go out on a limb for tools or hardware to do a job - and who have to buy and maintain our own computers.

If you buy a cheap POS machine, it will fail you. It will melt, RAM chips will drip off your graphics card, your OpenGL performance will suck and it will overheat, break and die when you need it most. Buy professional kit, then work it until a year after it's dead.

Stealing freely from Pratchett, it's like boots. If you buy a hundred-dollar pair of boots, then ten bucks maintainance a year will make them last a decade. If you buy a $20 pair of boots, you'll have to replace them every six months. After ten years, you'll have spent $400 - and your feet will still be wet.

Andyjaggy
02-11-2008, 05:08 PM
Yes I've always been a big fan of spending the extra money to get quality. Plus when I go cheap and get what I really don't want in the first place I will never be happy with it and then end up going back later and buying what I really wanted to begin with. Thus having wasted all the money on the first item that I didn't really want.

Phew, that's a mouthful.

Captain Obvious
02-11-2008, 06:17 PM
Well, I think he'd be pleased with my progress. I'm 23, and I have well over $10k in a savings account, all of which I have earned in less than a year. I've never been more than $20 in debt (I've owed people more, yes, but assets minus debts has never been below -$20). I've never bought "luxury items" on credit, either.

Really, personal finance ain't so difficult. It just takes a bit of discipline.

Bog
02-11-2008, 06:19 PM
Really, personal finance ain't so difficult. It just takes a bit of discipline.

Bring me 100 people with a bit of discipline, and I'll not only deliver you a full CGI movie in a year, I'll fix the balance of trade and cure poverty in four years.

Captain Obvious
02-11-2008, 07:51 PM
Well, counting me, at least we're up to 1 %!

Steamthrower
02-11-2008, 08:15 PM
6. Don’t have the cash for it? You can’t have it.

This single fact would save the financial rear ends of millions of people - who use credit cards like they are the Holy Plastic Manna or something. I used to get telemarketing calls about politics and trips to the Bahamas - now I get calls offering these credit deals for people who qualify. What counts, in order to qualify? Over $10,000 of credit card debt. $10,000 of credit card debt? Holy Smokin' Burrito, what are these guys buying with their plastic, a Aston Martin?

Work hard. Live good. Bring in that check and feed out less than you bring in. Doesn't take much. An honest ethos is about the greatest thing that can happen to a man.

mkiii
02-20-2008, 06:45 AM
$10k Aston Martin?... Can you give me the address of your local dealer... that would only buy a ford Ka round these parts.

BTW - Credit card balance 0.00p And that's the way I like to keep it. Unfortunately, the 100k mortgage on the house sort of makes a 10k credit card debt seem trivial.

Bog
02-20-2008, 06:48 AM
$10k Aston Martin?... Can you give me the address of your local dealer... that would only buy a ford Ka round these parts.

BTW - Credit card balance 0.00p And that's the way I like to keep it. Unfortunately, the 100k mortgage on the house sort of makes a 10k credit card debt seem trivial.

Tell me about it. Comes of living in the UK.... *sigh*

colkai
02-20-2008, 07:16 AM
Buy and run into the ground, that'd be me then. :p
My last car got sold with 145K on the clock and I only replaced it because I couldn't guarantee being in employ by the time it up N died on me.

This one had 28K when I bought it, I figure, it'l have at least another 100,000 before I get rid. :D

Computer equipment, well, my AMD1800+ died this year, I got it new. ;)

bobakabob
02-20-2008, 03:18 PM
Tell me about it. Comes of living in the UK.... *sigh*

Was it Mozza who sang "In the midst of life we are in debt"? :)

Iain
02-21-2008, 05:04 AM
Unfortunately, the 100k mortgage on the house sort of makes a 10k credit card debt seem trivial.

I wish my mortgage was only 100k. I'd probably sleep better :)

I don't have debt but at the same time I don't have any capital. I earn it and spend it(not on material things but on experiences and travel) which is what the wisest person I have ever met told me to do.

She lived by the mantra of 'Life is not a rehearsal. Enjoy it.'
Couldn't agree more.

Steamthrower
02-21-2008, 06:58 AM
Iain...I like that little mantra thing. So many times I see people who live in 3 bed 2 bath homes in the midst of 2000 other ones...a human honeycomb. They all get up at 6:00 and drive to work in identical cars. They work at the same corporate work all day. Eat at the same chain restaurant. Come home and eat a dull meal. And watch the same TV shows until they go to bed. And have nightmares about repos. Because every single thing they have isn't really their's: it's the bank's.

I think of that and then instantly revolt and hope I'll never do that...

dwburman
02-21-2008, 08:21 AM
I wish my mortgage was only 100k. I'd probably sleep better :)

I don't have debt but at the same time I don't have any capital. I earn it and spend it(not on material things but on experiences and travel) which is what the wisest person I have ever met told me to do.

She lived by the mantra of 'Life is not a rehearsal. Enjoy it.'
Couldn't agree more.


Good advice up to a point. :) It's no good tying your self in knots to gather stuff to put in a house then need to get a bigger house to put more stuff in...

on the other hand, it's wise to have some money saved up for when life takes a turn for the worse. You can't replace a car or buy food with memories of a great trip.

but, yeah. enjoy life when you can. :)