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meshpig
01-31-2008, 02:13 AM
After 25 years in the food Industry, I had to retire due to my failing eyesight.

-That means I have to now focus on home cookery and wow, what a joy!

No more midnight finishes 6 nights a week and raiding the top-shelf liquor until 4 am on 3 of them. Split shifts; which take up 18 hours of the day, 750 ml glasses of Rum in the Larder fridge at 10 am, stove burns, pan burns, oil spat burns, grill burns, being fired for no reason, working with subalterns and customers who have their head up their ***, wreaking of grease, 120 F heat... sh!tty pay etc. etc. , but didn't we just love it at the time!

I have seen some terrible examples of 3D animators living on packet noodles and frozen pies for weeks on end!!!

How about a food segment? Cook to render, for example... how to prepare and cook food timed on auto-pilot/remote whilst doing other sh*t, like sitting at the computer?

Yeah, BS, but for example this kicks for better cuts of meat and fish;


(Dukkah)-Sesame seeds, coriander seeds. cumin seeds, sea salt and hazelnuts all ground up in a mortar to a breadcrumb type consistency and you coat your Lamb backstrap, Salmon slice/(delice), Chicken fillet etc. with it and bang it into a hot oven.

Low fat and does wonders for the meat!!! Beats Colonel Sander's 11
supposedly secret herbs and spices.

M

DogBoy
01-31-2008, 02:35 AM
Ooh that would go nicely with black beans and rice ("Moors and Christians" as the Spanish call it):

Boil black beans with diced onion, a cinnamon stick and bay leaves.

When soft, drain and mix with chopped parsley+basil, a zest of an orange (plus half its juice), olive oil, salt and pepper. Spoon into and mix with boiled rice. Great on its own, great as an accompaniment to meat.

What is best is it doesn't need much watching, so you can LightWave away while it cooks :D .

(I also love basmati rice cooked with mustard seed and cashews).

colkai
01-31-2008, 03:23 AM
Living on soup at the moment, not got time to do anything else as life decided to once again get "interesting". :p

meshpig
01-31-2008, 03:38 AM
DB

Good going! Superstition aside, can't help but be on the side of the beans with Moors and Christians (Moros y Cristianos).

Yep, orange peel in any kind of stock for that sort of thing!!

How about Kedgeree?

-I grew up in London, never understood then that "salt and vinegar" was a hangover from the 12C French occupation and was "breakfast" for 300 years.


I think we are all F**ked up by kelloggs. Fish for breakfast, YUM!



M

meshpig
01-31-2008, 04:21 AM
Living on soup at the moment, not got time to do anything else as life decided to once again get "interesting". :p


Colkai


Cool. Don't half envy the soup weather you must have over there though, it's 10 pm. here and still over 30 C/90 F.


m

colkai
01-31-2008, 04:53 AM
Getting colder . they reckon snow / sleet for the weekend - Brrr. :)

meshpig
01-31-2008, 05:47 AM
Getting colder . they reckon snow / sleet for the weekend - Brrr. :)


Very cool indeed!! I have a mate in Moscow and always keep a weather widget on Dashboard to ogle the cold from afar.

-I also find myself staring at the air conditioner... :ohmy:


Soup recipes si vous plais?

m

colkai
01-31-2008, 05:54 AM
Heh, alas, Heinz Big Soup - nothing home made.
Used to love my mums Lentil and ham shank soup though. :)

MooseDog
01-31-2008, 06:07 AM
...Soup recipes si vous plais?

m

here's the easiest one for home: take your leftover pasta, chicken, whatever, dump it into the pot with one of those boxes of chicken stock they're selling just about everywhere now. bring to a boil, and done!

i don't know what you have on the store shelves down there mp, but here cans/boxes of stock (veg, chix, beef, fish) can now be found almost everywhere. as well as little jars of base (tho the chix base is a little too salty). very nice development imho.

nice dry rub btw:thumbsup: i'm gonna use that one.

mp: did i read that right? you've been on the line for 25 yrs!!?? wow, i thought my ten was too long. maybe this thread could also turn into a kitchen confidential sorta thing and we can regale the kids with kitchen stories (regale or shock depending on your point of view :D ) like the intern who decided the parking lot would be the perfect place to strain the lobster stock!!

MooseDog
01-31-2008, 06:11 AM
http://moosedog.wordpress.com/2008/01/27/i-blame-the-pizza-industry/

my 2 pence

meshpig
01-31-2008, 06:55 AM
Heh, alas, Heinz Big Soup - nothing home made.
Used to love my mums Lentil and ham shank soup though. :)

Absolutely! Catch a butcher by the toe... if you can find one who isn't a supermarket.

-We are blessed here with our Ethnic diversity; Pork rolls from the local Vietnamese bakery have 3 layers of pork on warm bread if you are passing by early AM.

- One as a slice from a rolled shoulder, another as a sort of galantine, and then a pressed component... but a nicely (home) made chicken liver pate brings it all home with chili, loads of picked coriander, julienne of carrot, telegraph cucumber and a dash of fermented soy.

-$3!!!!

You can live on that!!!

m:devil:

iconoclasty
01-31-2008, 07:14 AM
You heat water up in your college 1 cup coffee maker, then pour it over your package of ramen noodles. Total cooking time, about 5 minutes. Then back to modeling.

meshpig
01-31-2008, 08:28 AM
here's the easiest one for home: take your leftover pasta, chicken, whatever, dump it into the pot with one of those boxes of chicken stock they're selling just about everywhere now. bring to a boil, and done!

i don't know what you have on the store shelves down there mp, but here cans/boxes of stock (veg, chix, beef, fish) can now be found almost everywhere. as well as little jars of base (tho the chix base is a little too salty). very nice development imho.

nice dry rub btw:thumbsup: i'm gonna use that one.

mp: did i read that right? you've been on the line for 25 yrs!!?? wow, i thought my ten was too long. maybe this thread could also turn into a kitchen confidential sorta thing and we can regale the kids with kitchen stories (regale or shock depending on your point of view :D ) like the intern who decided the parking lot would be the perfect place to strain the lobster stock!!

MD

Ha! That's funny, straining stocks in the back-yard would be like Cafe confidential. Don't go there!

-Not precisely on the line for the whole time, pretty much varied, been there and everywhere. Boardrooms, Boarding Schools, Brothels, Boats... Hotels, Hostels, Haute Cuisine, Honeymoon restaurants.. it's all the same stuff.

Don't know what you'd tell the kids.


m

Stooch
01-31-2008, 11:55 AM
get a half chicken (with skin), sprinkle with goya adobo and pan fry with onions and olive oil until skin is crispy. goes great over rice

Andyjaggy
01-31-2008, 12:16 PM
Get a pound of chicken. Put it in a crock pot with an Italian dressing seasoning packet, 1 package of cream cheese, and 1 can of cream of mushroom soup. Let slow cook for 4-5 hours.

Great with rice.

Safe Harbor
01-31-2008, 02:00 PM
Sirloin steaks (or some kind of cheap beef - this recipe will tenderize it)
1 cup red wine
1 cup beef stock
large sliced onion

Sear steaks on one side, turn over, add onion, pour mixture overtop and let simmer on low heat until steaks are cooked (about a half hour). Also can be done in a slow cooker.

The broth is GREAT served over rice with asparagus.


Pork chops
1/2 cup catsup
1/2 cup beef stock
1 tablespoon lemon juice
3-4 tablespoons brown sugar
(I never measure this recipe - I make it to taste. Should be sweet/tangy)

Preheat oven to 375. Put pork chops in baking pan, pour half the mixture on top and cover with foil. Bake until chops turn white, turn over, pour rest of mixture on, continue to bake. When cooked through, remove foil and bake for 5-10 more minutes until mixture thickens. Broth is great on top of a baked potato.

Stooch
01-31-2008, 02:12 PM
speaking of ramen. get some alfredo sauce, some mushrooms and some chicken breast. cook the chicken all the way through, throw in the mushrooms and get em hot. throw chicken and mushrooms along with some alfredo sauce on top of cooked ramen noodles (toss the flavor packet) and enjoy. i even like to throw a nice cheesy texas toast in for full effect.

iconoclasty
01-31-2008, 02:22 PM
That's far too fancy for Ramen Stooch.

Andyjaggy
01-31-2008, 02:35 PM
Glad to see I'm not the only one around here that likes to cook!

Stooch
01-31-2008, 03:01 PM
That's far too fancy for Ramen Stooch.

you know i thought that too but it is the best alfredo i have ever had. something about the texture and the thickness of the noodles that complements the sauce and chicken so well. im sure some hardcore italians here are going to cry over this but its ok. im used to making people cry.

Steamthrower
01-31-2008, 03:04 PM
Nobody's mentioned fish n' chips.

Andyjaggy
01-31-2008, 03:06 PM
I made fish n chips last night actually. :D

The classic flour, egg, panko recipe. If you want to make gloriously deep fried food you've got to use the panko!

Red_Oddity
01-31-2008, 03:08 PM
Take a ice piece of salmon or some white fish.
Spread some virgin olive oil on a double folded piece of aluminum foil (just enough so you cover a piece large enough for the fish, use your fingers to spread it out evenly.)
Place the fish on the foil.
Cut some herbs (not too small pieces), parsley, spring onion, garlic, whatever you like.
Take a lemon and cut 2 nice slices from the middle, place it on top of the fish.

Now very carefuly fold the foil a bit up so you can poor some dry white wine in it.

Take the foil sides that go along the length of the fish, place them together and start folding multiple times until you touch the fish, so you close it off nicely.
Carefully close the 2 other sides one by one the same way until you touch the fish and end up with a nice package (don't rip the foil, that's the important part).

Place the package on a plate (because some moist will escape the package while cooking) and put in a pre heated oven at 200°C.
Let that go for somewhere between 10 and 20 minutes (depending on the size of fish filet)

Grab a bowl, take a handfull of cornsalad and mix with some other salads, cut some cherry tomatoes in half and add aswell, add some spring onion / scallion, squeeze a bit of the left over lemon in there aswell, add some virgin olive oil and some cottage cheese (try to get the less fatty one) and season to your liking.

By now your fish is probably done, place the packet on a plate, cut or fold open the top, scrape off the lemon slices and herbs, and your ready to go.


Very fast, very easy, very healthy, and easily adaptable to whatever herbs and ingredients you have lying about.


Oh and when you often get the munchies late at night, make sure you have some grapes frozen in the freezer (sounds weird, but it's a bit like snacking fruity ice cream, and it's not bad for you to boot)

Traveler
01-31-2008, 03:28 PM
k, I'll bite. ;D

Homemade peasoup (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peasoup).

(I think I burned my tongue too)

hrgiger
01-31-2008, 03:38 PM
Well, this morning for breakfast, I had 7/10 of a bannana. 3/10 of it fell on the floor and normally I would eat that too but it fell on the carpet which is a bit overdue for sweeping.
For lunch I had 3 delicious choclate chip cookes from the BP station while I was out delivering mail (Yes, I work for the government). I also had a refreshing Dr. Pepper. Not the most nutritious lunch I've ever had but I can't exactly eat a full course meal in my postal vehicle. I had a frozen pizza when I got home for work. Tony's. Delicious.
For dinner I ate a bit more sensibly. Chicken and vegetable stir fry with a garlic sauce.

prospector
01-31-2008, 05:09 PM
I BBQ at least 4 times a week and smoke cook 2.

I usully start a meal at least 8 hours before eating
With steaks and chops mainly on the menu, then some 5-6 pound roasts for the smoking.
Raining today and windy cold today so have to take extra care with smoker as it wants to cook lower than I like (about 8 hours at 250).

DogBoy
01-31-2008, 05:17 PM
Take a nice ...salmon preferably boned or filleted.


Spread some virgin olive oil on a double folded piece of aluminum foil (just enough so you cover a piece large enough for the fish, use your fingers to spread it out evenly.)
Place the fish on the foil.

Mix cottage cheese, lots of chopped dill, spring onions, shelled prawns and freshly crushed salt and pepper.

Fill the fish with the mixture, or if you have two fillets, make a sandwich


Take the foil sides that go along the length of the fish, place them together and start folding multiple times until you touch the fish, so you close it off nicely.
Carefully close the 2 other sides one by one the same way until you touch the fish and end up with a nice package (don't rip the foil, that's the important part).

Place the package on a plate (because some moist will escape the package while cooking) and put in a pre heated oven at 200°C.
Let that go for somewhere between 30 and 40 minutes (depending on the size of fish)

I usually make new potatoes and a salad

Very fast, very easy, (probably not) very healthy.

Sorry, Red, for heinous use of quotes :D

DogBoy
01-31-2008, 05:20 PM
k, I'll bite. ;D

Homemade peasoup (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peasoup).

(I think I burned my tongue too)

I love the Dutch peasoup. I ate 4 bowls when i went to the Arnhem zoo (or was it the open air museum) and didn't think it too many.

Hopper
01-31-2008, 05:34 PM
I think everyone should be forced to eat Ramen noodle soup for at least 2 years. It makes you appreciate the better things in life and would make people a little more humble and appreciative IMO.

That, and I still get excited when I find a quarter in the sofa cushions! :D

Andyjaggy
01-31-2008, 05:38 PM
I'll gladly eat Japanese ramen straight for two years :D If you've ever had real Japanese ramen. Oh man. Food of the Gods.

mrpapabeis
01-31-2008, 05:58 PM
1) Chili in a cast iron pot (dutch oven), cooked on a small fire just outside my porch.

2) Greek salad. Cukes, tomatoes, onions, Kalamata olives, and real Feta cheese. Olive oil & red vinegar with real dried oregano off the sprig.

3) A "London Broil" courtesy of my toaster oven. Sandwich meat for a week.

4) Giant bean soup with tomato and Octopus. Grandmother's recipe. Melts in your mouth.

5) Very good baked bread. Not store cut. Cut by my knife. As it should be.


GP

mrpapabeis
01-31-2008, 06:01 PM
Sorry, forgot the layer of cornbread over the chili.

IMI
01-31-2008, 08:08 PM
It's 10:00 and I just got home. My fiancé - my cook - is still at her sister's house babysitting her kid, because she works until 11:00.
Wandered through the leftovers in the fridge, searched the canned goods, considered tossing some chicken on the grill...
Ordered a pizza from Papa John's instead.. :D

Red_Oddity
02-01-2008, 02:38 AM
I'll gladly eat Japanese ramen straight for two years :D If you've ever had real Japanese ramen. Oh man. Food of the Gods.
I know what your talking about, especially the stuff they sell at those cheap dinner style places with the point and order cards...man i loved that stuff when i was in japan (and i still lost 3 Kg of weight when i was there, even though multiple times a day)

The best i ever ate though was in Tokyo Shibuya, at a steak house we had Kobe beef steak, that must have been the best meat i've ever eaten in my life.

Andyjaggy
02-01-2008, 08:30 AM
Oh man Kobe beef is amazing. I think I'll take my girl out for Japanese tonight :D

Steamthrower
02-01-2008, 08:34 AM
Oh man Kobe beef is amazing. I think I'll take my girl out for Japanese tonight :D

Better chance that you'll get her if you make some for her yourself. :cool:

Andyjaggy
02-01-2008, 08:47 AM
Oh she's all ready mine :) She knows I can cook up a storm, and I'm planning on making her a nice fancy Japanese dinner for Valentines.

prospector
02-01-2008, 12:24 PM
at a steak house we had Kobe beef steak, that must have been the best meat i've ever eaten in my life.
When stationed on Oki, I got to see how they did it.

It wouldn't be allowed here.

The calfs were soo pampered I almost wanted to be 1.

gjjackson
02-01-2008, 01:11 PM
Shwarma and falafel sound good right now.

meshpig
02-01-2008, 11:02 PM
Shwarma and falafel sound good right now.


Yeah, with pickled Turnips!!!!


-Wagyu/Kobe is indeed huge but overpriced, the A-grade, grain-fed free ranged, kryovac-pacs you buy from your wholesale butcher are just as good...

I never read threads which are more than 5 pages but there's lots of classic hone-cookery afoot!

Totally forgotten about canned mushroom soup as a thickening agent, the Industrial equivalent is powdered... but at home, don't forget pearled barley, lentils.


- A good way of cooking rice (auto-cook to get back to modeler) is to stir it though some moderately hot vegetable oil (Some finely diced onion, subtle chopped herbs... garlic,oregano, thyme), in a heavy pan with a lid.

Just enough oil and heat so the rice gets hot and coated without burning.

Add enough hot stock/water to cover the rice by 3/4 of a thumbnail - yeah, you just stick your thumb in, or about 1 cm or less than half an" and bring it to a rapid boil with the lid on for 2 minutes or so and then turn it off and leave it to absorb.

Once it's boiled and the lid is on don't touch it, move it or stir it just leave it and get back to work!

.. or get a rice cooker, but they're a pain in the b**t because then you have this great big pot which only cooks rice. Whereas if you use a heavy saucepan it does just as good a job and lots of other things besides!!!

- leave cooked rice in the fridge overnight (so the starch consolidates) and it's ready for frying the next day with a little omelette, soy sauce and whatever and for brown rice triple cooking the times.



m:)

Iain
02-02-2008, 05:32 AM
I've just made some lentil soup.
So easy; Ham stock, 3 diced carrots, 1 chopped onion, one potato (optional) and a cup of lentils and you have a truly nutritious meal.

What is it about the class mentality of this country, though, that I hated myself for using stock cubes until a posh TV cook (Nigella) said it was ok?

And why does Nigella make me come over all funny? I was never an lover of the milf before now. Is it her looks, her cheeky winks or her £7m London pad?

DiedonD
02-02-2008, 05:55 AM
And why does Nigella make me come over all funny? I was never an lover of the milf before now. Is it her looks, her cheeky winks or her £7m London pad?

Well :D You certainly mentioned the 3 greatest ways a woman seduces a man!

Here The Man doesnt cooks generally speaking. Thats the womans job. But I do remember having to cook by myself back when I was a teen. I was trying vegetarianism. That was perceived as EVIL by everyone, due to lack of much needed proteins in anything other but meat. So the preasure grew to the point that noone cooked for me, and I had to do it of course. Either that or meaty foods. WHich I must say almost all meals have meat on em here.

:) That in itself reminded me of a story. Back then I was going to be engaged with my gal, and I asked for her mother to cook something with no meat in it. She stood there thinking "Now what am I going to cook for him?!" for hours :) .

So I knew how to cook beans, rice, Soya chunks - which is the closest thing to a meat if your not going for it. And the like.

Now, if pushed to extreemes, I know I can cook something so as I wont starve to death. But you guys sound soo articulate about it, as if its something youve perfected over the years.

meshpig
02-02-2008, 10:14 PM
I've just made some lentil soup.
So easy; Ham stock, 3 diced carrots, 1 chopped onion, one potato (optional) and a cup of lentils and you have a truly nutritious meal.

What is it about the class mentality of this country, though, that I hated myself for using stock cubes until a posh TV cook (Nigella) said it was ok?

And why does Nigella make me come over all funny? I was never an lover of the milf before now. Is it her looks, her cheeky winks or her £7m London pad?

All that, she's hilarious. Have you ever noticed how many times she licks her fingers and sticks them back in the food?... it's totally milf.

m

MooseDog
02-03-2008, 06:37 AM
...
What is it about the class mentality of this country, though, that I hated myself for using stock cubes until a posh TV cook (Nigella) said it was ok?

...

is it class or basic nutrition? those bullion cubes have enough sodium to send a horse into cardiac arrest.

mho, no more complicated is to buy a can/box of broth/stock. check the ingredients list and pick the one with the least amount of sodium and sugar.

for the kids and i the other night, i took the leftover pasta alfredo, leftover chicken legs and leftover mashed potatoes, dumped a box of chicken stock over top, boil and eat. success!

Kuzey
02-03-2008, 07:20 AM
I'm about to have some of this (http://banuskitchen.blogspot.com/2007/03/kiymali-pidehomeade-meat-pita.html) shortly :)

Kuzey

DogBoy
02-03-2008, 08:56 AM
- A good way of cooking rice (auto-cook to get back to modeler) is to stir it though some moderately hot vegetable oil (Some finely diced onion, subtle chopped herbs... garlic,oregano, thyme), in a heavy pan with a lid.

Just enough oil and heat so the rice gets hot and coated without burning.

Add enough hot stock/water to cover the rice by 3/4 of a thumbnail - yeah, you just stick your thumb in, or about 1 cm or less than half an" and bring it to a rapid boil with the lid on for 2 minutes or so and then turn it off and leave it to absorb.

Once it's boiled and the lid is on don't touch it, move it or stir it just leave it and get back to work!
m:)

That is pretty much my recipe for cashew rice, except I brown the cashews first with mustard seed, before adding the rice.

Iain
02-03-2008, 12:47 PM
is it class or basic nutrition? those bullion cubes have enough sodium to send a horse into cardiac arrest.



Well it says on the box that 100ml of the stock has 0.9g salt which is only 16% of an adult's daily requirement.

As we eat very healthily as a family and don't add salt to anything, that really doesn't worry me, especially when the other ingredients are veg an pulses-probably the most nutritious of the food groups.

Much more convenient than boiling a pig bone for hours and getting complaints about bone in the soup.:)
Or was that just my house-
"Mu-um there's a horse's tooth in my soup!"

Andyjaggy
02-04-2008, 07:23 AM
We have something called "better then bullion" here in the states. And guess what it really is better then bullion. I'll never go back to using those hard little salt cubes again!

Here's a marinade for you chefs to try out :) If you dare.

6 cloves garlic minced
2 tablespoons ginger minced
4 serrano chilies minced
2 green onion minced
¼ cup cilantro minced
1 tablespoon lime zest
¼ cup lime juice
¼ cup hoisin sauce
¼ cup red wine vinegar
¼ cup fish sauce
¼ cup honey
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons oil

meshpig
02-05-2008, 01:41 AM
We have something called "better then bullion" here in the states. And guess what it really is better then bullion. I'll never go back to using those hard little salt cubes again!

Here's a marinade for you chefs to try out :) If you dare.

6 cloves garlic minced
2 tablespoons ginger minced
4 serrano chilies minced
2 green onion minced
¼ cup cilantro minced
1 tablespoon lime zest
¼ cup lime juice
¼ cup hoisin sauce
¼ cup red wine vinegar
¼ cup fish sauce
¼ cup honey
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons oil


Sounds great! Cilantro is Coriander for those not familiar with the US parlance.

- That would be for some big green tiger prawns hey, but don't marinate them for too long... about half an hour will do. They shrivel up and die otherwise.

-We've been eating too much meat lately... but wanted a hearty meal since it's raining and a measly 23C/73F.

Quick Lasagne:

-Mince some seeded Kalamata olives, a few de-salted (rested in olive oil) preserved Anchovy fillets and yesterday's fresh 12 pound Tuna which you pulled in on a beach rod/canned but in oil, in a mortar or food processor and work it into what the French call a "Tapenade" (that's the traditional recipe) or olive paste.

-Roasted red Capsicum (Paprika, Peppers)... and Goats cheese.

-Buy fresh sheets of pasta and just pop them individually into boiling water for a few minutes to half cook them through...

It is quick because it only takes ten minutes in the oven or if you just assemble it from straight out of the pot there's no more cooking involved. The hot pasta will melt the cheese. Just layers of pasta, the "Tapenade"/olive paste, roasted peppers and Goats cheese ( lots of extra virgin drizzle activity) will do nicely but couldn't resist a snot of baking it further;


54467

Excuse my humble kitchen. The steel rings are cheap, any catering store will have them and you cut the pasta using the same beforehand so you have individual Lasagne stacks.

M:)

meshpig
02-05-2008, 02:25 AM
... like so,



54468


-Some greens too of course! terrible shot but...

(cooking at home)

m

MooseDog
02-05-2008, 04:27 AM
...That would be for some big green tiger prawns...

i had those years ago when i visited n.z. fantastic little crustaceans.

do you guys get those enormous green-lipped mussels? they were unbelievable. i'd never seen mussels that big, and expected them to be kinda bland, but just the opposite. despite n.z. being so well known for it's lamb, i found the seafood selection to be amazing. :bowdown:

did a stuffed leg of lamb at work last weekend. served up with some roasted yukon golds, wilted arugula and tomato vin. sold out:thumbsup: .

meshpig
02-05-2008, 05:42 AM
i had those years ago when i visited n.z. fantastic little crustaceans.

do you guys get those enormous green-lipped mussels? they were unbelievable. i'd never seen mussels that big, and expected them to be kinda bland, but just the opposite. despite n.z. being so well known for it's lamb, i found the seafood selection to be amazing. :bowdown:

did a stuffed leg of lamb at work last weekend. served up with some roasted yukon golds, wilted arugula and tomato vin. sold out:thumbsup: .


Kuel. Yeah, but what's not so good is that 20 years ago you could snorkel for legal Abalone (5" shells) in those waters not too far offshore and bring back bags of them. @ $100+ p/kg.

Now, nothing like that.

-Big green hairy mussels, Abalone... what do they call them again? Ah yes, vertical similes?


m:)

meshpig
02-05-2008, 05:49 AM
-Big green hairy mussels, Abalone... what do they call them again? Ah yes, vertical SMILES!:)

cholo
02-06-2008, 06:35 PM
Try this recipe if you like cake. Takes about 15 minutes to make...

Take a 150 gram bar of bittersweet chocolate and melt it in the microwave oven.

Blend it with 6 eggs, 1 cup of sugar and 90 grams of butter in a regular blender. Add 1 cup of walnuts and blend for 5-10 seconds, not longer or it'll get too bitter. Pour in a microwave safe mold and microwave at HIGH for around 10 minutes (varies from oven to oven, if in doubt check with a fork.

ENJOY! :)

Btw, some of my favorite eats are... Tacos al Pastor, Chilaquiles, Carnitas, Chiles en Nogada, Cochinita Pibil, Tamales, Sushi (Nigiri kind, none of that roll crap), Chinese (Mapo Tofu and Hot and Sour anything), Hamburguers(Ruben's, Micky D's, Carl's Jr.), Costco Hot Dogs, Nutella Crepes, etc...

meshpig
02-07-2008, 04:28 AM
Cholo

As in MUD CAKE!+++++++

-24 egg yolks beaten into a cold custard ( a Sabayon), then the whites of whisked to a peak.

- A Kitchen-Aid at full stick after the bowl has been in the freezer for 15 mns , a dash of salt in the egg whites.

Just high for the yolks, they go white when "cooked" cold.


-then fold 750 grams of Belcolade

http://www.puratos.com/products_solutions/chocolate/belgian_couverture_chocolate/default.aspx

gently melted over a simmering pot of water.

Fold it all together, gently so you don't lose the aeration and pour it into a spring-form pan lined with alumina foil, bake for 3 hours in a low oven in a tray of water to keep the moisture up etc. etc. and I'm thinking I must have been crazy when I started this thread.

I couldn't care less about the profit margins in the food industry.... I've seen cash registers which need to be emptied every 20 minutes ten in a row... lunchtime takings of $50 000+ for mums and dads buying cheeseburgers at the zoo.

Interesting array of fave's though.


m

cholo
02-07-2008, 11:02 AM
Great stuff, can't wait to try that mud cake :)

Btw... Which kind of belcolade? Dark, milk or white?
If I can't find belcolade here, would Lindt work as a substitute?

meshpig
02-08-2008, 06:42 PM
Great stuff, can't wait to try that mud cake :)

Btw... Which kind of belcolade? Dark, milk or white?
If I can't find belcolade here, would Lindt work as a substitute?


-Dark for both, Lindts' fine. Low oven as in 110C/220F.

... you need to leave it in the fridge overnight to get the foil off. Then melt some more choc add some cream (ganache) so it's smooth then coat the whole cake and let it set in the fridge.

Beware the symptoms of a chocolate overdose!

m :)

cholo
02-09-2008, 01:23 PM
Ok, just before I go to the supermarket to buy all the ingredients fo this, I need to know 2 more things...

1) What size mudcake are we talking about here? 24 eggs sounds like a lot :)

2) Any particular recipe for the custard?

Thanks,
Luis.

meshpig
02-10-2008, 11:34 PM
Ok, just before I go to the supermarket to buy all the ingredients fo this, I need to know 2 more things...

1) What size mudcake are we talking about here? 24 eggs sounds like a lot :)

2) Any particular recipe for the custard?

Thanks,
Luis.


C

That's the divisible one for a 12" spring-form. Makes 16 portions... I wouldn't recommend quartering it but say 12 eggs, 375 g/12 ounces of chocolate in a 5" spring-form ( the tins which spring open on the side) which you have to line with foil and cover the top too, then bake sitting in a tray of water)

-The reason Dark chocolate is preferable is because the fat content is cocoa butter whereas in milk chocolate, it's mostly dairy solids. Cocoa butter is the
"mystical" ingredient.

For the cold custard you will need a Ristretto pulled straight from the handle, or an appropriate coffee flavouring to add at the end when folding into the chocolate.

400g/14 ounces in the original
recipe of dark brown sugar.

- Sugar and whole eggs in a kitchen Aid if you are lucky enough to have one at home ... or any mixer, and whisk until it's a firm, aerated whitish custard and fold into the chocolate (... then the coffee, or whatever; Rum, Frangelico??) you've gently melted over a pan of simmering water.

For a smaller cake, reduce the cooking time but not proportionally. For half size it will still need 2 hours at least. But because the egg is more or less already cooked and there's no flour involved you are only setting it in the oven. If you baked it quickly it would rise about 6" and you ruin the mud effect.

I can't find any decent pics on google, they all look a bit lame. I used to work in a serious Patisserie (only as a cook)... the way he used to
finish his chocolate gâteaux was with a big clump of melted chocolate worked on a marble slab.

A few minutes later it was pliable like pastry and he'd cut a big strip about 1/4 " thick and 5" wide and wrap it around the cake... but pouring the ganache (melted choc and cream) can give you a perfect finish too.

m:)

meshpig
02-11-2008, 04:01 AM
... basic spring-form tin.


54621

m

Matt
02-11-2008, 04:27 AM
I rarely eat. Was it Michael Jackson who was quoted as saying, if he didn't have to eat to stay alive, he wouldn't bother!

I know where he's coming from! Too many cool things to do, food just gets in the way!

:D

Although I did have a nice Chicken Rogan Josh curry last night! Yummm!

MooseDog
02-11-2008, 07:44 AM
...I used to work in a serious Patisserie...

color me impressed:bowdown: to this day i just cannot get my head around anything on the pastry/baking side of things. if i try to do something myself, i usually end up with something you could use to hurt people with:D at home, me and betty crocker are good friends:thumbsup:

Stooch
02-11-2008, 03:21 PM
color me impressed:bowdown: to this day i just cannot get my head around anything on the pastry/baking side of things. if i try to do something myself, i usually end up with something you could use to hurt people with:D at home, me and betty crocker are good friends:thumbsup:

the only thing i can bake is a simulation....


ha ha......


ha.

Steamthrower
02-11-2008, 03:37 PM
the only thing i can bake is a simulation....


ha ha......


ha.


Ha.

meshpig
02-12-2008, 12:36 AM
I rarely eat. Was it Michael Jackson who was quoted as saying, if he didn't have to eat to stay alive, he wouldn't bother!

I know where he's coming from! Too many cool things to do, food just gets in the way!

:D

Although I did have a nice Chicken Rogan Josh curry last night! Yummm!


It was probably Andy Warhol before Jacko and maybe Anna Rexia before him...?

Isn't that what neurotics say of just about everything though (not meaning you)?

m

meshpig
02-12-2008, 01:25 AM
color me impressed:bowdown: to this day i just cannot get my head around anything on the pastry/baking side of things. if i try to do something myself, i usually end up with something you could use to hurt people with:D at home, me and betty crocker are good friends:thumbsup:


Yeah, that's what people say when I sort of advise them to invest in a heavier pan over some cheap supermarket sh!t.

-Baking is dependent on the attributes and properties pane of a given oven and all you can do mostly is try not to burn your !%$#@ fingers, never mind the golden pastry.

m:)

meshpig
02-12-2008, 02:15 AM
It was probably Andy Warhol before Jacko and maybe Anna Rexia before him...?

Isn't that what neurotics say of just about everything though (not meaning you)?

m


... not meaning to be patronizing.

-Not eating is logically included just that you run into difficulties with notions and ideology; with "fasting" in it's spiritual/religious guise.

Scientifically, it's better to have a banana for breakfast rather than than nothing.

m

Steamthrower
02-12-2008, 09:20 AM
Actually I'd have to say that "not wanting to eat" isn't necessarily weird or anything. I can understand Matt not wanting to eat...there's nothing religious or psychological about it.

I mean, to me, why spend a couple hours preparing some meal that will take you fifteen minutes to consume? When you could have read an entire novel during that two hours and then grabbed a granola bar? It's just my metabolism that makes me personally not love food. And I'm still 6' 3" and less than 150 pounds. Not anorexia or bulimia or anything...just skinny...and not hungry...

meshpig
02-12-2008, 11:28 PM
Actually I'd have to say that "not wanting to eat" isn't necessarily weird or anything. I can understand Matt not wanting to eat...there's nothing religious or psychological about it.

I mean, to me, why spend a couple hours preparing some meal that will take you fifteen minutes to consume? When you could have read an entire novel during that two hours and then grabbed a granola bar? It's just my metabolism that makes me personally not love food. And I'm still 6' 3" and less than 150 pounds. Not anorexia or bulimia or anything...just skinny...and not hungry...


Yeah, that's cool... of course there isn't anything religious about not-eating and obviously eating too-much is worse.

I'm 6' and 165 pounds, I was joking about anorexia although it's no joke... you can still appreciate/"love" food without being a glutton though.

Time spent cooking is really just a process; like reading a book, you don't generally ask for too much at the end of it because, yeah, it all ends up in the drain in no time and there are plenty things to do otherwise. I say if you are going to cook you should do it well.

Half your luck if you can run on a good book and granola bar.

m

meshpig
02-12-2008, 11:37 PM
... sorry, ≈180 pounds (metric conversion).

m

MooseDog
02-13-2008, 04:38 AM
one man's passion is another man's chore.

take cars for instance. the world's not lacking in people who love cars. read about them, polish them, covet them, go to shows, etc etc. me...i HATE cars. i mean i f-ing hate cars. i've even got a whole prepared diatribe for folks who try to talk to me about how wonderful their car is.

btw, did a tea-smoked trout last weekend. had everyone at work hacking and coughing because of the pepperflakes in the smoke mixture :).

meshpig
02-13-2008, 05:43 AM
one man's passion is another man's chore.

take cars for instance. the world's not lacking in people who love cars. read about them, polish them, covet them, go to shows, etc etc. me...i HATE cars. i mean i f-ing hate cars. i've even got a whole prepared diatribe for folks who try to talk to me about how wonderful their car is.

btw, did a tea-smoked trout last weekend. had everyone at work hacking and coughing because of the pepperflakes in the smoke mixture :).

Moosedog

Sh!t, I knew there would be something amusing in this thread somewhere.

That's hilarious, your antagonism towards cars. I totally agree.

-If you are interested in reading this is worth a look;

http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=11143

-(not much use now because you've got to shell-out $$$, but the idea is that there are several ratios of speed in the world which pertain to perception beginning with your metabolic rate and so on... Interesting idea) ... because it's hard to tell what exactly annoys where cars are concerned.


- Tea-smoked!! Tea is good liquor too, as it were for poaching and adding flavor in sneaky ways. No smoke.


m:)

PS. modeled any cars lately, not.

Steamthrower
02-13-2008, 10:04 AM
take cars for instance. the world's not lacking in people who love cars. read about them, polish them, covet them, go to shows, etc etc. me...i HATE cars. i mean i f-ing hate cars. i've even got a whole prepared diatribe for folks who try to talk to me about how wonderful their car is.

Cars are wonderful, beautiful objects which are the supreme example of technological progress, engineered and refined until they gleam with a beautiful sense of belonging.

Cars! O cars! Does the feel of the gearshift in your grasp not send twitches of glee throughout your body? Does not the sight of a speed limit sign engender a deep loathing and instrinsic hatred? Do you go into angry convulsions at the sight of a Geo Metro and then sigh in relief as you step into your Aston Martin?

I'm wanting this diatribe...you said you have it prepared...

greeb1957
02-13-2008, 10:24 AM
My dream car is a 1969 lime green Camero with two black stripes running up the middle.

Andyjaggy
02-13-2008, 10:24 AM
Ah so true.

Food is something I am very passionate about and I've never understood people who only eat because they have to! To each there own.

MooseDog
02-13-2008, 02:52 PM
...I'm wanting this diatribe...you said you have it prepared...

:D

Cars are the current solution to an eternal problem: how to get there from here. it's a losers solution too.

here i am paying interest on a depreciating asset (paying more for something that's worth less every day). but not just any depreciating asset, oh no, but one that regularly falls completely apart.:help:

but i don't have a choice, i have to be a loser too. it's when i was born. it's not an accident that the only division w/in american car companies that makes money is the financing arm:devil: .

ok you say, buy a used car. well, one w/o too many problems still has to be financed. yes, i'm a loser:beerchug: i hate being in a car.

i did this once out in chicago and they looked at me like i was an alien:D glad to oblige. in manhattan, i had a nodding audience.

Steamthrower
02-14-2008, 06:52 AM
here i am paying interest on a depreciating asset (paying more for something that's worth less every day). but not just any depreciating asset, oh no, but one that regularly falls completely apart.

Aha. But I drive a 1984 Mercedes. If taken care of, it'll be able to be sold for the exact same price that it was bought (used) for...but then again that's a little different than most...your point is made. I actually don't like cars all that much either. :D

Andyjaggy
02-14-2008, 09:14 AM
I love cars. I just hate paying for them and fixing them.

Steamthrower
02-14-2008, 11:00 AM
Well, I love ancient Chinese artifacts, I just hate paying for them and looking at them 'cause they're so darn ugly.

Did you guys know that you can get a used 15-20 yr old Porsche 944 or 924 for $5,000 to $12,000? Ebay Motors is getting a heavy page usage from me these days...:D

Stooch
02-14-2008, 12:07 PM
you might want to check your balls to see if they are still there.


one man's passion is another man's chore.

take cars for instance. the world's not lacking in people who love cars. read about them, polish them, covet them, go to shows, etc etc. me...i HATE cars. i mean i f-ing hate cars. i've even got a whole prepared diatribe for folks who try to talk to me about how wonderful their car is..

theo
02-14-2008, 12:27 PM
I love cars. I just hate paying for them and fixing them.

I hated fixing them so I buy late-model Toyotas.

Typically, if you hate paying for cars it is automatic that you WILL be fixing them. After all: hate-to-pay translates into buy-on-the-cheap which translates into torture-me-monthly-with-costly-repairs.

I do believe in corporate feudalism, but at least I am a reasonably happy peasant since my cars always work great.

In the end, though, I could care less about cars. I like... um, other stuff.:D

Andyjaggy
02-14-2008, 12:49 PM
I have a 96 camry that I got in 2003. It's been great. 130k miles and I haven't had to put hardly any money into it.

theo
02-14-2008, 12:55 PM
I have a 96 camry that I got in 2003. It's been great. 130k miles and I haven't had to put hardly any money into it.

Well there you are then. You DO hate fixing cars more than buying them.:D

Toyotas are not failsafe. But, in my view, this brand certainly does prefer the road over the mechanics garage.

Steamthrower
02-14-2008, 01:03 PM
I have a 96 camry that I got in 2003. It's been great. 130k miles and I haven't had to put hardly any money into it.

Yeah, I bet you haven't even had to change the oil yet, either, those cars run so long.

RollerJesus
02-14-2008, 01:58 PM
I haven't checked in on this thread in a while, but I see it has taken an unexpected turn toward discussing the automotive industry. Didn't expect that.

However, if any of the food gods are still around, I need a chili recipe for a cookoff this weekend. Last year, the guy that won used a Jack Daniels and top sirloin recipe. I'm thinking Texas style with Chateaubriand... :thumbsup:

Maybe I'll call it the French Texan. :thumbsdow

cholo
02-14-2008, 03:31 PM
I've found that adding the juice of a couple of small tangerines to any good chili recipe makes for an interesting aroma and taste. Also, try using chipotle for the spicyness, it works out really good. Other than that, the basics, paprika, onion, oregano, basil, pepper, garlic, salt, vinegar, olive oil, tomato sauce, rosemary, dillweed, chicken stock, ground beef, beans, etc... I have no specific amounts, since I always cook it a little different. Another good tip is trying out different kinds of beans. My personal favorite is a kind of bean called peruvian bean.

Hope it helps. :)

MooseDog
02-14-2008, 09:58 PM
google "san antonio" chili. i got second place last year in a cook-off with this kind of chili. it's actually more of a beef stew type of thing, no ground beef involved and certainly no beans. i was told that had a most original category been involved, i'd a-won:D

after that, chili is all about personal taste. i 100% support cholo's advice to use chipolte's. smoky, tasty, really good stuff. they're what i used to tweak my san antonio chili.

i know meshpig's got the goods, but chili is an american (continent) original, what with the capsican pepper being native here and all. delicious and good fun:thumbsup:

RollerJesus
02-15-2008, 07:08 AM
Thanks for the insight all. Much appreciated.

Lightwolf
02-15-2008, 07:54 AM
Chilli? I like to add a bit of chocolate...

Which reminds me, that sounds like a good idea for the week end cooking session...

Cheers,
Mike

Andyjaggy
02-15-2008, 11:18 AM
I always add a touch of cinnamon to my chili. I also slow cook the meet in bacon grease and a select blend of spices for about 2 hours.

I made French onion soup last night. Another one of my favorites. Anyone care to share their secret recipe for French onion soup?

Hopper
02-17-2008, 01:05 PM
Chilli? I like to add a bit of chocolate...
Regular chocolate?

I use unsweetened cocoa powder, cumin, and a touch of cinnamon in mine, but I've seen plenty of recipes with an actual Hershey's bar thrown in.

Lightwolf
02-17-2008, 04:33 PM
Regular chocolate?

I use unsweetened cocoa powder, cumin, and a touch of cinnamon in mine, but I've seen plenty of recipes with an actual Hershey's bar thrown in.
Well, decent chocolate, not Hershey's ;) And it ought to be dark chocolate... not too much of it either, just to enrich the flavour.

I could trade a recipe for goulash that I cooked yesterday :) Either that or my very favourite bulgarian spinach soup (which is a family recipe). It's too cold for that at the moment though (at least over here).

Cheers,
Mike

P.S. To set the record straight, I'm definetly more into cooking than cars. Food just tastes better :)

MooseDog
02-17-2008, 10:03 PM
...Anyone care to share their secret recipe for French onion soup?

brandy? don't know if you've done this or not: when the onions are done browning, deglaze with some brandy and simmer until the alcohol is evaporated. then dump that mess into your beef-broth...oh, and use gruyere cheese to melt on top at the end....oh and good!! bread. aahhh that's another great discussion: bread. here in vermont we're blessed with a huge selection of local bakers making the real thing: good hard crust, sourdough starter, organic wheat flour, the whole nine yards. even my 8 yr old insists her lunch sandwiches be made with good sourdough!:thumbsup:

meshpig
02-19-2008, 04:13 AM
Chilli? I like to add a bit of chocolate...

Which reminds me, that sounds like a good idea for the week end cooking session...

Cheers,
Mike


Hey, that's very savvy!

m

Lightwolf
02-19-2008, 04:25 AM
Hey, that's very savvy!

No savvy, savoury ;)

Cheers,
Mike

meshpig
02-19-2008, 04:34 AM
google "san antonio" chili. i got second place last year in a cook-off with this kind of chili. it's actually more of a beef stew type of thing, no ground beef involved and certainly no beans. i was told that had a most original category been involved, i'd a-won:D

after that, chili is all about personal taste. i 100% support cholo's advice to use chipolte's. smoky, tasty, really good stuff. they're what i used to tweak my san antonio chili.

i know meshpig's got the goods, but chili is an american (continent) original, what with the capsican pepper being native here and all. delicious and good fun:thumbsup:

Ah, yes. "Chili" as in from episodes of Columbo ( the how-done-it detective from the 70's) and Rockford; james Garner from the "Rockford Files"( if they aren't too beyond the pale)? - It always sounds so absolutely satisfying...

m:thumbsup:

meshpig
02-19-2008, 04:49 AM
Regular chocolate?

I use unsweetened cocoa powder, cumin, and a touch of cinnamon in mine, but I've seen plenty of recipes with an actual Hershey's bar thrown in.


The difference there would be that Hershey's bars are corn syrup and fat with cocoa flavor.

Unsweetened/bitter cocoa powder and ground cumin seed would be hugely more interesting.

m

meshpig
02-19-2008, 05:59 AM
Originally Posted by Andyjaggy
...Anyone care to share their secret recipe for French onion soup?

Sorry, couldn't find the original post.

The "secret" to cooking (French) onion soup is in both the quality of the white stock and how gently you cook the onions.

They go sweet as you probably know if you melt them in butter for as long as your stove will bare it without burning them. Nice @ 40 mins. for slices.

These days you don't cook a roux (cook flour) into the onions, you reduce the stock ( demi-glaze/jus) add some port/madeira and if need be whisk some nobs of butter into the slightly cooled soup a'la buerre monte

http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/aspen-2002-buerre-monte:-the-workhorse-sauce

That's if you aren't afraid of using butter!

m:)

Andyjaggy
02-19-2008, 08:42 AM
the recipe I followed used redwine in the stock and I wasn't sure I was crazy about it.

I did carmelize the onions in butter for about 45 minutes :) I was tempted just to eat the onions at that point but resisted the urge.

I also tried the Gruyere cheese which was fabulous. I'd never even heard of it before until I made French onion soup. It's kind of like a swiss cheese but a little more mild. Good stuff.

art
02-19-2008, 09:12 AM
Does anyone know how to prepare a marinara sauce like the one they usually serve with pasta at italian restaurants? I tried some marinara sauces sold in jars in food stores but those are usually not even close and taste more like regular spaghetti sauces.

Steamthrower
02-19-2008, 09:23 AM
I also tried the Gruyere cheese which was fabulous. I'd never even heard of it before until I made French onion soup. It's kind of like a swiss cheese but a little more mild. Good stuff.

I have a Swiss friend from the Gruyere region. I'd never heard of the cheese before, until he brought some. It was pretty amazing stuff.

Also a very nice cheese is Butterkase, which I think is mainly found in north Germany (at least that's where I've had it). It's a very rich and pale and light cheese which sort of reminds you of a "sweet cheddar". It almost melts in your mouth. Ah. Cheese.

Andyjaggy
02-19-2008, 09:31 AM
I love cheese. too bad in these parts people most often associate cheese with dry stale flavorless bright orange cheddar that is pre-shredded and available in your local grocery store.

I once went into a long spiel about how some cheese is better then other cheese and this professed "chef" girl I worked with gave me a blank stare and said "cheese is cheese."

Doh!

Steamthrower
02-19-2008, 10:05 AM
For someone who has eaten Velveeta and Cheez Whiz all day every day their entire lives, I'm sure "cheese is cheese."

But the Initiate shalt enjoy their lives, not throwest it away to the wind. We shalt have Cheese.

RollerJesus
02-19-2008, 10:20 AM
Hey all...

Just wanted to let you know I won the chili cookoff on Sunday. I used a Guinness based recipe and had a great response from all the judges.

1 cup salted butter
3 pounds ground chuck
2 pounds ground pork
2 pounds delmonico, 1/2 - inch cube
2 cups onion
3 medium jalapenos, seeds and veins removed
2 habaneros, seeds and veins removed
8 oz Guinness Stout
1/4 cup flour
2 cups crushed tomatoes
1/4 cup tomato paste
4 cups beef stock
1 cup cooked black beans
1 cup cooked kidney beans
1/2 cup Chile powder
4 tablespoons dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon Kosher salt
2 teaspoons ground white pepper
2 teaspoon ground cumin
1 cup shredded cheddar cheese

Seared the meat, added it to the pot and started cooking it together with the Guinness. Delicious.

Steamthrower
02-19-2008, 01:54 PM
Ever tried it with Mackeson beer?

It's stouter than Guinness Extra Stout and has a malted chocolaty flavor.

Jim_C
02-19-2008, 02:25 PM
For someone who has eaten Velveeta and Cheez Whiz all day every day their entire lives, I'm sure "cheese is cheese."

But the Initiate shalt enjoy their lives, not throwest it away to the wind. We shalt have Cheese.

Do I get any credit for melding the now 2 topics of this thread into one? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBVdAZlLkXg)


cheese for poor people!

RollerJesus
02-19-2008, 03:16 PM
Ever tried it with Mackeson beer?

It's stouter than Guinness Extra Stout and has a malted chocolaty flavor.

I can't say I have, but it's a good idea.

meshpig
02-19-2008, 11:43 PM
the recipe I followed used redwine in the stock and I wasn't sure I was crazy about it.

I did carmelize the onions in butter for about 45 minutes :) I was tempted just to eat the onions at that point but resisted the urge.

I also tried the Gruyere cheese which was fabulous. I'd never even heard of it before until I made French onion soup. It's kind of like a swiss cheese but a little more mild. Good stuff.

Yep, Gruyere is a town in Switzerland. It's a standard for baking and cooking
because it's mild and when baked doesn't become salty like say a cheddar would.

You can still "monte" little cubes of cheese into the liquid with a whisk.

I agree, red Wine is something you use sparingly. It tends to yield mostly tannin in the cooking process so use white wine mostly when you slosh it into the pot, but fortified wines are different.

-Sherry for example is almost a perfect substitute for Mirin but try adding Coca Cola to the juices next time you do a pork roast. The joke is I got that from my wife's Hungarian/Jewish grandmother.

M

Andyjaggy
02-20-2008, 04:13 PM
I use mirin all the time. A habit I developed while living in Japan.

meshpig
02-21-2008, 01:25 AM
It was all SE Asia in my day, so to speak.

-I live near a good Robatayaki; I love the way they use Mirin because it's almost synonymous with the proverbial Nihonshu.

- Copious quantities of both seem to fit with BBQ's and Grills the world over.

m

MooseDog
02-21-2008, 05:54 AM
always happy to learn:) mirin is what, rice wine? or maybe rice wine vinegar?

if the former, can it be successfully reduced for a sauce like regular wine? maybe an asian bearnaise? sounds cool as a concept.

if the latter, maybe an asian gastrique?

coca-cola has many cooking uses:D (besides rotting your teeth!). we use it for our pulled pork barbeque, braised overnight at 250degF. also the classic ingredient in red-eye gravy. google it!:D

Andyjaggy
02-21-2008, 09:19 AM
It's a very sweet rice wine.

Rice wine vinegar is also great. Once you get used to rice wine vinegar you will never use that nasty apple vinegar again.

meshpig
02-22-2008, 01:03 AM
MD

A Mirin reduction would be unnecessary - like you wouldn't reduce Bourbon or Whiskey for a Béarnaise ( it would have to be "Hollandaise" since Tarragon wouldn't go so well) .

Cool concept, would go nicely with all sorts of Asian green vegetables etc!

-It's reducible but like soy reductions... totally *&^*&! salty.

Yeah, Apple vinegar is usually pretty bilious. The thing with vinegar generally is to spend the extra $$ for the good stuff be it whatever. Although if it's just to acidify the water for poached eggs, plain old acetic acid will do.

m:)










m

Dhruv
02-22-2008, 03:14 AM
Hey ..how come no one has mentioned Indian food?!!! well here I go.. Heat two tablespoon of oil..add two cardimoms, two cloves, two/three black peppers and
a cinammon stick..Cook for a minute or so..add two chopped onions..till golden
brown..add chopped gardlic and ginger..and if you are brave add some red or green chilly..after a minute add chopped(or tinned ) tomatoes..and then add
about a pound of chicken pieces.. cook for two/ three minutes and add half pint of water...cook for 25 minutes or until chicken is cooked Garnish with some green corriander leaves..There you have it..Chicken Masala Curry!! Enjoy.
Dhruv
London

MooseDog
02-22-2008, 07:17 AM
thanx mp:thumbsup:

i've got some squid to deal with this afternoon, could be interesting:D

art
02-22-2008, 07:33 AM
Just wanted to let you know I won the chili cookoff on Sunday. [...]
1 cup salted butter
3 pounds ground chuck
2 pounds ground pork
2 pounds delmonico, 1/2 - inch cube
2 cups onion
[...]
4 cups beef stock
1 cup cooked black beans
1 cup cooked kidney beans
...
How many portions it that? That's a lot of meat. I'll try this nevertheless.


Hey ..how come no one has mentioned Indian food?!!! well here I go..[...] Enjoy.
Dhruv
London
Hey, I love Indian food. I'm putting this one in to my recipes file as well.

RollerJesus
02-22-2008, 07:48 AM
How many portions it that? That's a lot of meat. I'll try this nevertheless.

It's hard for me to say, because the rules had non-contestants serving the chili, but i can tell you that it filled a 4 quart pot nearly to the top.

8 people cooked and over 50 judged and I ran out about 30 minutes before the end of the contest.

Patrick

35mm
02-22-2008, 08:55 AM
I am a useless cook, but I like simplicity. You can't beat a soft boiled egg served with toast soldiers. Or how about english cheddar cheese on toast, melted under the grill until the peaks are just starting to turn brown.

And now for the ultimate, simple, cheep, and very healthy dish. Fresh Atlantic Mackerel - wrap in newspaper, and run under fresh water until newspaper is soaked. Place in a hot oven for about 10 mins until newspaper is dry. As you unwrap the newspaper it will also remove the skin. It's delicious as is, but if you must, add what ever you like to it. The great thing is, it's one of the tastiest oily fish, and incredibly easy to catch. Providing you live near the atlantic of course!! It's my favourite fish - you can keep your bass, salmon, trout, john dory etc!!!!

Or if you live in the UK - how about some delicious spider crab? In spring and early summer, fishermen are plagued by these crustaceans, and there is no domestic market for them. So take a visit to your local fish market, and buy some of the prickly little critters - they should still be alive (so you can have fun racing them before you cook them)! If you are feeling kind you can kill them first using a nail just above the purse (look it up on the web). Boil them up one at a time in a big pan for about 5 mins per pound (I think it is). Get some heavy duty tools - nut crackers, hammer etc. Get cracking, and serve the meat with salad or how ever you like. Alternatively (recommended), you can just buy a load of spider crab claws, as that's where the best meat is any how - cook & crunch. The meat is very sweet and delicious, and much nicer than edible (brown) crab meat although edibles have more meat. Spider crab meat is actually very similar to, and almost as nice as lobster! Although it's worthless in the UK (because no one buys it here), and therefore regarded by fishermen as a pest, in other parts of europe, such as france and spain it is very popular and fetches a good price!

theo
02-22-2008, 09:07 AM
It's my favourite fish - you can keep your bass, salmon, trout, john dory etc!!!!

That may be so, my friend, but until you've ingested Lake Erie Walleye fashioned to a palatable perfection by Sister Shirley in Sandusky, Ohio, near the bay, you have not enjoyed your English life to its fullness.

35mm
02-22-2008, 09:20 AM
That may be so, my friend, but until you've ingested Lake Erie Walleye fashioned to a palatable perfection by Sister Shirley in Sandusky, Ohio, near the bay, you have not enjoyed your English life to its fullness.
Ahh, but as I said, I like simplicity. So jumping on a trans-at flight to munch on an "Erie Walleye fashioned to a palatable perfection by Sister Shirley in Sandusky, Ohio, near the bay", sounds a bit complicated to me :D

theo
02-22-2008, 09:54 AM
Ahh, but as I said, I like simplicity. So jumping on a trans-at flight to munch on an "Erie Walleye fashioned to a palatable perfection by Sister Shirley in Sandusky, Ohio, near the bay", sounds a bit complicated to me :D

True... but to be fair, I wasn't addressing 'that' part of your statement.

Putting simplicity aside for the moment: if you did expose your English backside to a jet seat for one succulent bite of Sister Shirley's perfect Lake Erie Walleye you would happily sell out simplicity for complexity.

I would wager that Sister Shirley's perfect Lake Erie Walleye would render Russia's stark Putin capable of flouncing and prancing in pink tights and mini bells.

Ah, such is the power of the palate.

35mm
02-22-2008, 10:50 AM
I would wager that Sister Shirley's perfect Lake Erie Walleye would render Russia's stark Putin capable of flouncing and prancing in pink tights and mini bells.
If it's likely to have that effect.... well do I need to say more? My English backside will not be observed in pink tights and mini bells. I'm sticking with Mackerel!

Jim_C
02-22-2008, 10:57 AM
Hey all...

Just wanted to let you know I won the chili cookoff on Sunday. I used a Guinness based recipe and had a great response from all the judges.

1 cup salted butter
3 pounds ground chuck
2 pounds ground pork
2 pounds delmonico, 1/2 - inch cube
2 cups onion
3 medium jalapenos, seeds and veins removed
2 habaneros, seeds and veins removed
8 oz Guinness Stout
1/4 cup flour
2 cups crushed tomatoes
1/4 cup tomato paste
4 cups beef stock
1 cup cooked black beans
1 cup cooked kidney beans
1/2 cup Chile powder
4 tablespoons dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon Kosher salt
2 teaspoons ground white pepper
2 teaspoon ground cumin
1 cup shredded cheddar cheese

Seared the meat, added it to the pot and started cooking it together with the Guinness. Delicious.

OK RollerJ, I'm turning this over to my girlfriend the gourmet of the household...
She said she might use ground breakfast sausage instead of ground pork.
Not sue why, she's the expert.. but thanks for the recipe!!
looking forward to it!

Jim

theo
02-22-2008, 11:14 AM
If it's likely to have that effect.... well do I need to say more? My English backside will not be observed in pink tights and mini bells. I'm sticking with Mackerel!

Just merely exhibiting Lake Erie Walleye power in the hands of a skilled Lutheran. If Putin can be rendered to dance a shock jig in pink tights and mini bells, surely the 'simple' desires of the human weapon, 35mm, can be rendered complex, eh? :D

RollerJesus
02-22-2008, 11:15 AM
OK RollerJ, I'm turning this over to my girlfriend the gourmet of the household...
She said she might use ground breakfast sausage instead of ground pork.
Not sue why, she's the expert.. but thanks for the recipe!!
looking forward to it!

I hear the Jimmy Dean's as a secret ingredient is a wonderful sub froma very reputable source...

best of luck and don't forget to let me know how you like!

Patrick

Dhruv
02-22-2008, 02:11 PM
Hey guys
In the UK number one food is still Indian ;-) Chicken Tikka Masala to be precise!! Let me also tell you that this dish doesnt exist in India at all!! Yup it was invented almost accidentally in the UK by a waiter to please an English Saab! If any one wants a recipe please let me know!! Cheers..

35mm
02-23-2008, 01:41 AM
Hey guys
In the UK number one food is still Indian ;-) Chicken Tikka Masala to be precise!! Let me also tell you that this dish doesnt exist in India at all!! Yup it was invented almost accidentally in the UK by a waiter to please an English Saab! If any one wants a recipe please let me know!! Cheers..
Yea that's quite an interesting point about how the brits invent their own "foreign" dishes. Spaghetti bolognas isn't Italian. Welsh rabbit isn't welsh. Cornish pasty was actually invented in Devon, not Cornwall.... what's going on here? Any more examples?

DiedonD
02-23-2008, 01:51 AM
I just had burger meat but in mayonaized and spiced bread, all BBQ-ed (the bread and the meat). Two of such. And man its lovely. Sometimes you just say. Damn the cholesterol. You know. To hell with it, im not skipping this one down.

meshpig
02-23-2008, 04:58 AM
thanx mp:thumbsup:

i've got some squid to deal with this afternoon, could be interesting:D


No problem.

-If you don't already, try scoring the inside of the tube once you've cut it flat ( a diagonal cross- hatch but not cut all the way through) and it curls up into those neat little tractor-tyres when you apply the heat.

m:)

Lightwolf
02-23-2008, 05:12 AM
Any more examples?
Croissants aren't french but austrian, french fries from Belgium, Bavarian white saussages are french... I could probably think of a few national ones as well :)

Cheers,
Mike

meshpig
02-23-2008, 05:40 AM
Yea that's quite an interesting point about how the brits invent their own "foreign" dishes. Spaghetti bolognas isn't Italian. Welsh rabbit isn't welsh. Cornish pasty was actually invented in Devon, not Cornwall.... what's going on here? Any more examples?


Good question but it isn't only the Brits...

-The "plough-man's lunch", the "Club Sandwich"?

Realistically, you don't have to observe the rule of cultural authenticity and exoticism because food has always been migrating around the planet along with it's ingredients.

On the contrary, Spaghetti Bolognese for example; what's the "authentic" version in Bologna today? There isn't' one and 100 years ago it was something entirely different there too.

m:)






You mean "Welsh rarebit"?

Lightwolf
02-23-2008, 05:57 AM
On the contrary, Spaghetti Bolognese for example; what's the "authentic" version in Bologna today?
Not Spaghetti (according to a mate of mine from Bologna) :)

Cheers,
Mike

meshpig
02-23-2008, 06:21 AM
Not Spaghetti (according to a mate of mine from Bologna) :)

Cheers,
Mike

Yeah, it's like Tagliatelle but my point is 50 years ago it was something else again in Bologna too.

-"Curry" was the word for and the way the British summed up all the regional indian dishes under the Raj.

Authenticity doesn't mean a lot...

But hey, check out the spasm for hair on the 9.5 post.

m

art
02-23-2008, 07:59 AM
So you just mix it all together and cook? And for how long, approx?

Seared the meat, added it to the pot and started cooking it together with the Guinness. Delicious.

Jim_C
02-23-2008, 01:27 PM
So you just mix it all together and cook? And for how long, approx?


We (well Therese the girlfriend) made this last night.....

After searing and adding the steak we(she) let it cook for probably about 60-80 minutes. Just until the steak cubes were the temp we wanted, about med, almost med well.

I loved it, but the girlfriend who is a tough nut to crack when it comes to food answered this way..

"What do you think?"
"It's good"
"Just good? Don't love it?"
"Yea I like it."
"Would you make it again"
"Oh yea"

DING DING DING DING WE HAVE A WINNER...!!!
Although she is always restrained with compliments (always) the admittance of her desire to make it again said it all!!!!


Oh and we did add breakfast sausage instead of pork. Tasted great but did add a little extra grease. No real biggie.


Thanks Patrick!!! makes my lunch for awhile also.

Jim

meshpig
02-23-2008, 10:15 PM
So you just mix it all together and cook? And for how long, approx?


You can just mix it all together and cook but it's better to have all your ingredients ready and start with the meat, which you want to brown evenly without other things getting in the way.

Then you add the onions, garlic spices veg. and once they're done you add the stock and then the Guinness. Like, bring it to the boil with just stock or water and then add the Guinness when it's simmering because Beer doesn't like being boiled hard so you just simmer it down.

If you dust the meat with flour first before Sautéing it , that will act as a thickener or you can lob a handful of pearled Barley into the mix instead.

Normal Stewing and Braising cuts need between an hour/hour and a half on mod to low heat ... a simmer. As a general rule.


m

RollerJesus
02-24-2008, 10:08 AM
Thanks Patrick!!! makes my lunch for awhile also.

So very welcome, just happy someone else was able to enjoy it!

Patrick

meshpig
02-26-2008, 02:49 AM
These rings are so cool.

The trouble with long periods in the food Industry is
you burn -out and end up being like a piece of wood. You forget most of what you know in any creative sense because it's long since become automatic.

-simple tinned Tuna sandwich:

OK, so I bought a new whizzer today and made the mayo but also some fresh Beetroot and Carrot whizzed, then good brand tinned Tuna mixed in.

-Chopped Cornichon ( baby cucumbers)
-Diced red onion and a little daikon radish.
-Coriander, lemon juice and a white wine vinegar/mirin vinaigrette with enough sea salt to taste.

Lettuce cut in strips and bound in the mayo, Rye toast cut with the rings, stack it up in layers in all of 15 minutes and...

55167

Yeah, home cooking is all about no customers, so no BS. It's a Tuna sandwich when it's at home even though it's probably quite mad to post pics of your evening meal?




m:)

art
02-29-2008, 02:49 PM
For a change, what is the nastiest things you tried or were offered to try (even if you liked it)?

For me the list is:

Tripe soup - I actually like the soup, but meat pieces, no thanks.
Blood sausage - I kind of like it, especially fried with eggs, but I try not to think about the main ingredient when eat it.
Headcheese - I tried it, never liked it, but some types of it look tasty.
Pig snouts - A friend of mine loves it and he offered to prepare it for me one day. We'll see.
Chicken feet - See above. Same guy
Fried pork livers - I't ok, but I can live without it.
Chicken hearts in grey sauce - I tried it long time ago, never liked it
Cow's tongue in horseradish sauce - Taste is somewhat ok, but the thought of eating a cow's tongue ruins it for me.
Steak tartare - It disguisted me all my childchood. Now I like it but I eat very very rarely. I'm affraid of the mad cow's disease and what not. Salmon version is good.
Caviar, oysters, squid - They are on my "nasty" list, but I learned to like shrimp and calamari.

Andyjaggy
02-29-2008, 02:53 PM
Steak tartare looks just plain nasty.

Fermented squid intestines would have to be on the top of my list. Nasty. Nasty. Nasty.

art
02-29-2008, 02:56 PM
I heard about the fermented shark meat they it in Iceland, i believe. I never tried it, but sounds just as nasty.

Andyjaggy
02-29-2008, 02:56 PM
oh by the way if your meat has madcow disease in it I don't believe cooking it will actually kill the disease. So your screwed whether you eat the meat raw or cooked.

art
02-29-2008, 03:07 PM
Well, anyway, I consider eating raw beef too risky to eat. My father started using salmon (I don't know if its safer) for his occasional tartares and for me that's usually the only occasion to eat this... ehm.. delicacy.

Andyjaggy
02-29-2008, 03:16 PM
Yeah I won't eat raw hamburger. Bad idea. Steak is okay to eat raw because the inside of the meat has never been exposed to air, so it is free from bacteria, and the outside gets cooked so it is safe.

Raw salmon should be okay, as long as you get it very fresh. Having lived in Japan for a little bit you learn to not be so scared of raw fish. I still don't care for it but I'll eat it if I need to.

meshpig
03-01-2008, 02:06 AM
You generally don't eat the part of the cow which can be infected with BSE or "mad cow's disease". Muscle meat is considered safe and Tartare or Carpaccio are cut from the Fillet, from the same muscle as the small side of a T-bone steak.

Cow's tongues are delicious but along with bones, tripe and livers they're more risky in terms of BSE (bovine spongiform encephalitis- spongy brain).

The number of reported cases of BSE in animals is very low and the human variety, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is also, though because of the way it is spread ( from the distribution of infected animal material as animal feed) the risk of an "outbreak" is potentially high.

Personally, i love it. Salmon too, but if you are slightly squeamish about it you can always "Gravlax" your salmon fillet. The word comes from Sweden and literally means grave salmon because they used to leave it in the snow along with sugar and salt, herbs and berries for a few days until it "cooked".

At home you cover the whole fillet in sugar, salt, juniper berries and dill, wrap it in cling wrap and place something heavy on top of it then leave it in the fridge for a day or so.

Or you can buy it but it's %1000 cheaper if you buy the whole fish and cure it yourself.

m

Exception
03-01-2008, 02:46 AM
I ate nothing today.
I just drank a lot.
Does that count?

Shiraz, Bass beer, Cabernet Sauvignon and Baileys....
The vegetarian life does not mean you need to digest boring stuff :)

Andyjaggy
03-03-2008, 08:27 AM
I love the Mr. Bean episode with the steak tartare.

art
03-03-2008, 08:49 AM
I don't remember that one but I bet it was funny.
I saw a "taboo" episode 11 on national geographic channel this weekend. Whatever I have on my "nasty" list is nothing compared to what others eat, including:

Toasted tarantullas
Eyeballs
Hissing roaches stuffed with teriyaki sauce
Worms and maggots
Toxis fish
and more.

I'll have my steak tartare, thank you.

Andyjaggy
03-03-2008, 08:58 AM
Anyone here had Katsudon?

One of my favorite Japanese dishes. Breaded and deep fried pork cutlet cooked on top of a bed of onions that are simmered in a sweet teriyaki sauce with lots of mirin and then covered with an egg that can be cooked to your desired preference. Served on top of a bowl of rice. It's amazing.

Steamthrower
03-03-2008, 09:19 AM
I love ethnic foods. I even dared to eat blutwurst in Europe (blood pudding). I had to say no to the fried eels though. However nothing is quite as good as a fried battered pork chop with liberal amounts of thick gravy and buttered mashed potatoes and fried okra in the crispiest Southern style...talk about grease...

I determined though that I would not let diets and organic foods and "healthy" stuff deter me from enjoying life. After you eat so much carob, tofu, soy, and whole wheat, a Snickers bar is just too good. I've been healthy my entire life, am never sick more than once or twice a year with a cold, and will probably stay that way.

So I'll eat bacon and pork and potatoes and everything, stay thin and in shape, with no regrets.

I can either eat health food and live to be 87, or eat bacon and live to be 84. I can sacrifice three years.

kopperdrake
03-03-2008, 10:44 AM
For a change, what is the nastiest things you tried or were offered to try (even if you liked it)?

ooh...

1) Chicken feet - imho a pointless dish, mainly fat around skinny bones, just a carrier for the sauce.

2) Extremely old eggs preserved by boiling in a dark sauce, a sweet soya type I think, given by a Taiwanese friend. Pretty nasty tasting, got my own back by feeding him stilton...

3) A Norwegian cheese - in fact two Norwegian cheeses. One of them, a whey cheese (the bit most countries discard) boiled down and used to make a creamy, fudge-like sweet cheese. The other, I never knew the name of it, reminded me of crumbled digestive biscuits with a strange sweet/bitter taste. The onle cheese I *really* don't like...I'd be interested to know what it was so I can get some for my dad to try.

4) Foie Gras - I couldn't really see the point of putting an animal through that for something that tastes so like 'pate', but then I am a heathen Englishman who couldn't tell the difference between the cheap and expensive red wine in the local cave (but at 25p per litre difference I still splashed out on the expensive stuff to preserve some pride ;) ).

Inigo - your fried battered pork chop description is making me hungry :D

Steamthrower
03-03-2008, 10:49 AM
No one on these boards has had a meal until they have had fresh fried okra cooked by an old Southern grandmother. I promise you, it's worth the trip just to wander around until you hit a cafe in a gas station. I've had okra prepared by many people and it's pretty bad stuff unless you eat it in the heartland. In all seriousness, my mouth is watering right now as I type. I love that stuff. I could eat a pound of it.

Good grief. Now I've made myself crave okra and it's out of season. Crap. Hot double dang.

Zane Condren
03-03-2008, 10:50 AM
pickeled Beef Heart is Delicious.

meshpig
03-04-2008, 10:25 PM
ooh...

1) Chicken feet - imho a pointless dish, mainly fat around skinny bones, just a carrier for the sauce.



If it's done properly and the chicken used is corn fed or free ranged, it's a gelatinous blast of flavour.

You sort of have to see it in context... as part of a banquet with 12 courses or a Yum Cha where it is one of potentially hundreds of courses... buuuurp!

- "Foie Gras" is Pâté; in French it reads Liver Fat and so it's Pâté de Foie Gras... a paste of liver fat, because the French also make Pâté out of meat and fish. So, you can eat in now without feeling inferior.

m:yoda:

SandroBenigno
03-05-2008, 04:14 PM
Sushi and beer... :beerchug: