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ted
01-12-2008, 03:20 AM
Good day gents. Don't hang here much but I just got a TriCaster Pro for a couple 1 hour video's I'm producing next week.

I first want to say wow, I haven't been able to put it down since it arrived this afternoon. I even brought it home and hooked it up with some home gear because it was so easy. Wife went to bed long ago. :sleeping:
What an awesome Production Tool and I'm up to speed with only a glance at the manual so far! :thumbsup:

Anyway, if you were heading out on your first TriCaster outing, are there a couple tips from the Vets? (I helped Jeff do NewTek's 20th, but mostly dealt with camera).

These are "How to" videos with one talent.
It's a simple 4 camera switch with a fixed set.
Wide with op, Tight roving on dolly with op, over set lipstic type cam, no op and another fixed cam, no op.
I'll swap top and fixed cam inputs to get a 4th input/angle when needed, but not often.
(I'll probably move up to the Studio verson for growth).
One wireless Mic.
Control room is my comfy Motorhome :thumbsup: just outside the door. Won't even need the generator.
I'm only recording the switch and will post in SE. Don't want to gamble with GFX my first time out.
I'll break each show into about 3 parts/files.

Am I safe enough to leave the "back-up" Beta Machine in the edit bay? I'm not totally comfortable, but haven't lost any files in years. Too much protection is too much work. What are your thoughts?
Would you trust recording to the hard drive?
How careful do you need to be about overmodualting audio?

I've done live news, shows and live sporting events for nearly 30 years, but never with a Tricaster! :hey:
I bet the Network units could dump a whole semi-rig by using a few of these. :D

Thanks for any thoughts.
I could see this becoming part of my arsenal so I'll see ya around.

SBowie
01-12-2008, 06:36 AM
Morning, Ted. :)

Am I safe enough to leave the "back-up" Beta Machine in the edit bay?There is no "safe," right? There is only "safe enough" (relative to how much you have hanging out there if it goes south.) Few if any devices are 100% reliable, and that's without considering Murphy's Law of Unforeseeable Dependencies. ;)

ted
01-12-2008, 12:41 PM
Yeh, I know. :agree:
Being an Eagle Scout has driven my "be prepared" for the worst work ethics. But even my guys tell me I'm making it too hard on myself sometimes. :Tricaster

Cineman
01-12-2008, 01:36 PM
Would you trust recording to the hard drive?
1st: Gonna sound silly, but don't forget to start the recording before you start the switch. It's easy to forget that you are also the VTR operator with this jewel.

2nd: Don't forget to stop recording before shutting down the TriCaster. Else, you will lose the whole recording.

I would record the back-up. Is not that I don't trust the NewTek product. It's me that I have the trust issues with.


How careful do you need to be about overmodualting audio?
It's the exact same as VT[4]. Fairly narrow window. It is digital audio, after all. Monitor it.


I'm only recording the switch and will post in SE. Don't want to gamble with GFX my first time out.
Am awful hard headed about "if it is switched live, it will be a live production". Graphics keys are amazingly easy, and all can be monitored large size in the text edit window before they are put to air. For "full screen" GFX, there is always the Picture Player.

CG Post is included with the TriCaster Editor, but like you, since I already have VT and years of familiarity working with if I tend to go to that for post.

Nes Gurley

CreatvGnius
01-12-2008, 04:00 PM
1st: Gonna sound silly, but don't forget to start the recording before you start the switch. It's easy to forget that you are also the VTR operator with this jewel.

2nd: Don't forget to stop recording before shutting down the TriCaster. Else, you will lose the whole recording.

I would record the back-up. Is not that I don't trust the NewTek product. It's me that I have the trust issues with.


It's the exact same as VT[4]. Fairly narrow window. It is digital audio, after all. Monitor it.


Am awful hard headed about "if it is switched live, it will be a live production". Graphics keys are amazingly easy, and all can be monitored large size in the text edit window before they are put to air. For "full screen" GFX, there is always the Picture Player.

CG Post is included with the TriCaster Editor, but like you, since I already have VT and years of familiarity working with if I tend to go to that for post.

Nes Gurley

Some more tips for you, Ted:
Do set up your RECORD TO DISK file LOCATION and NAME ahead of time, under the RECORD/STREAM tab.

As you're well aware, be certain all your camera cables are essentially the exact same length to the TriCaster Pro, to simplify camera matching within INPUT SETUP's "Proc Amp" pane.

Also, give yourself a really good test, for quality of audio capture from the mics you'll be using in the project, ensuring that you've got appropriate settings in place, to match on your the mics' output levels, relative to the input sensitivity of TriCaster Pro.

I had to grab a miniature screwdriver to lower the audio output on my SHURE wireless lapel mic's transmitter, when I first tried directly connecting it to a TriCaster STUDIO™ audio input. (Just something you don't want to overlook checking into).

Another note on audio: my understanding from Tech Support is that TriCaster STUDIO™ (at least) employs floating-point audio. I'm not absolutely sure about the original (TC100) and TriCaster PRO™

Relative to video levels -- I prefer having the ZEBRA and ILLEGAL modes engaged on the TriCaster STUDIO™throughout a live switch, just for quick confidence monitoring of said levels (since I don't want to be merely eyeballin' an LCD display) in making a judgment, nor do I want to have to refer to the waveform monitor so much, either.

Go ahead and connect a VTR to TriCaster Pro Y/C or Component Out, with your production monitor -- at *least* for your first go-round, eh?

Continue to toy around with it - but most especially do so in every aspect you'll be employing it for the shoot -- would be my closing recommendation.

Welcome to the TriCaster™ community. 'Feels *good*, doesn't it!? :thumbsup:
-PeterG

ted
01-12-2008, 08:49 PM
Steve, I know you're right. I wanted you to talk me out of the extra gear, and then I could blame someone else! :D

Nes, hit record. Got it. Sounds simple, but yeh, don't forget. ;)
And stopping would be easy to forget after calling "cut" and wanting to chat about the last segment.

And yeh, we are doing a complete dry run in our studio Monday. Every tool will be connected and tested like it was the real thing.
Friday I found a few missing elements and had those delivered. You know all the various cables, connectors etc. I even picked up a new 24" flat screen for TC so I don't have to tear out any studio gear.

Fine, I'll take the Beta Back-up! :devil: I know I'd be an idiot not to. Thanks for driving that in my wishful head. Especially for my virgin voyage it’s a must. :thumbsup:

I practiced adding GFX live last night and it isn't that hard after all. But my client isn't prepared enough to lock that info down anyways. :hey: There is enough money for posting and that lets the client change his mind without going to the ISO cams footage hopefully.

Peter, already did that while practicing. Don't want to be fishing around when the normal chaos of live TV is on my shoulders. Thanks.
Yeh, matching the mike receivers output ahead of time is important. My Sennheiser is really subject to over powering the input device. This will be checked and double checked.
Yes on the back-up. Dang you guys. :D But thanks for not letting me make that stupid mistake!

And yes, it is fun again. I had to slam down a second Brandy at 2:45 this morning so I could turn off this awesome toy and get some sleep.
Thanks everyone.

ted
01-12-2008, 09:00 PM
Oh yeh, I will be bringing my 25" Sony Monitor in the motorhome. I just gotta get a decent set of speakers set up so I can trust what I hear.

CreatvGnius
01-13-2008, 08:00 PM
Oh yeh, I will be bringing my 25" Sony Monitor in the motorhome. I just gotta get a decent set of speakers set up so I can trust what I hear.

On that note, I wonder what folk here think of those Klipsch Promedia Model 2.1 computer speakers with the subwoofer (available at Best Buy) for about $160 bucks. Personally, I wouldn't mind having them connected to the headphone output of TriCaster™ -- but I'm not sure about how "linear" the audio performance is, compared, say, to some true "monitor" speakers.

Any ideas?
-PeterG

MrMark501
01-14-2008, 06:39 AM
Ted,
Make sure you bring along a UPS. Tricasters don't like dirty power and I had mind totally cold start on me once during a concert. Thank goodness I had ISO cameras going (Saved my butt). You can't always count on clean power at the venue, so a good UPS with power condition would be a great idea. I keep one with my kit now. Much heavier to lug around than a power strip, but well worth the insurance. Just my $.02

CreatvGnius
01-14-2008, 08:33 AM
Ted,
Make sure you bring along a UPS. Tricasters don't like dirty power and I had mind totally cold start on me once during a concert. Thank goodness I had ISO cameras going (Saved my butt). You can't always count on clean power at the venue, so a good UPS with power condition would be a great idea. I keep one with my kit now. Much heavier to lug around than a power strip, but well worth the insurance. Just my $.02

Utterly prudent to have a UPS with power conditioning capability on deck. Good call, Mark!
CyberPower 1200AVR in use here (available at Best Buy), as it doesn't have a bulky form-factor compared to some notable others.
-PeterG

ted
01-14-2008, 10:13 AM
Mr Mark, good point. I already have that covered, but yes, I would be an idiot to "assume" some facility I've never been to will have clean power. :tsktsk:
Thanks,

Cineman
01-14-2008, 10:56 AM
Ted,

Know that you are in the reasonable sound condioned environment of your Motorhome for monitoring the audio this time. If next time, or some future, you find yourself doing the switch out in the house, in the middle of everything, as often happens to me; drop us another post or E-mail me. I have a good headset solution for monitoring audio when flying solo.

Nes Gurley

ted
01-14-2008, 10:45 PM
Nes, I'd like to hear that option. How would I be able to yell at my camera guys if I'm in the same room though? :D

CreatvGnius
01-15-2008, 11:48 AM
Mr Mark, good point. I already have that covered, but yes, I would be an idiot to "assume" some facility I've never been to will have clean power. :tsktsk:
Thanks,

Gang! One other thing: Do you guys n' gals have a habit of testing the power circuit you intend to use, at a production site, with an AC polarity tester?

Said tester (it looks like a little plastic block with 3 LEDs on one end and triple-pronged AC plug on the other) sells for less than $15 bucks from Radio Shack, Sears, et al.

Really good for being able to determine if the AC is *wired* correctly, and grounded -- *before* plugging in that valuable UPS/Surge Suppressor/Line Conditioner! :thumbsup:
-PeterG

ted
01-15-2008, 11:17 PM
Ah yes, another good point.

GREAT example why...We were doing a shoot at a supermarket chain. We plugged our 1K soft box into a normal, unmarked outlet. BAMB!!!
Turns out, for some reason, they had a 220v outlet with a typical edison outlet. No markings, no red cover, not even mark-a-lot writing.
We lucked out and only lost a $60 bulb, but it scared the bigibbers out of my lighting director.
I don't ever think we got a good reason why it was done that way, but I used a mark-a-lot and wrote 220V on it. :D

So yeh, those yellow checkers are a good investment! :thumbsup:

KWeaver
01-15-2008, 11:30 PM
Morning, Ted. :)
There is no "safe," right? There is only "safe enough" (relative to how much you have hanging out there if it goes south.) Few if any devices are 100% reliable, and that's without considering Murphy's Law of Unforeseeable Dependencies. ;)
Steve says it ALL!
Ken W.

ted
01-21-2008, 04:05 PM
Just a quick follow-up. We've been swamped and will finish these videos next week, I hope.

We ended up making 7-8 switched segments of each 1+ hour show. I brought the segments in VT5 and now that I've seen each segment, I'm very happy.
This will make post much easier.

TriCaster opens up new sources of revenue for us. It's a great production tool!
You can bet your Bippy we'll be doing more of this over the next few years! :Tricaster Thanks NewTek. :thumbsup:

CreatvGnius
01-28-2008, 02:42 PM
Just a quick follow-up. We've been swamped and will finish these videos next week, I hope.

We ended up making 7-8 switched segments of each 1+ hour show. I brought the segments in VT5 and now that I've seen each segment, I'm very happy.
This will make post much easier.

TriCaster opens up new sources of revenue for us. It's a great production tool!
You can bet your Bippy we'll be doing more of this over the next few years! :Tricaster Thanks NewTek. :thumbsup:

Hi, again, Ted -- Portability and time-savings during residual Post production aside, how is it that TriCaster™ will enable you to make more money? Tell us what you've been most impressed with, in this regard. :hey:
-PeterG

ted
01-28-2008, 06:52 PM
I want to be careful because my competition reads my posts. :hey:

Seriously, the fact that I could shoot Two, hour + shows in a day and post each of those in less then two hours means I can take more of this kind of work. Previoulsy I would have been over priced for these and not gone after them.

Every week we have speakers at various Hotels and banquet facilites. If I can take a couple cameras, live switch and probably do all posting live, I can sell the speaker on having a finished DVD to send out for more work. Instant demo for them. Easy one day productions for us.

The list of quick, easy, multi-camera productions is endless. I won't list all my options here. :D
But shooting all day and spending several days posting at our rate has excluded us from taking these on.
With TriCaster I can hold our hourly/daily rate and land a few more of these type gigs because we can do more for less.

For much more discussion I'd rather take it off forum. At least till I own the market. :D

CreatvGnius
01-28-2008, 10:30 PM
I want to be careful because my competition reads my posts. :hey:

Seriously, the fact that I could shoot Two, hour + shows in a day and post each of those in less then two hours means I can take more of this kind of work. Previoulsy I would have been over priced for these and not gone after them.

Every week we have speakers at various Hotels and banquet facilites. If I can take a couple cameras, live switch and probably do all posting live, I can sell the speaker on having a finished DVD to send out for more work. Instant demo for them. Easy one day productions for us.

The list of quick, easy, multi-camera productions is endless. I won't list all my options here. :D
But shooting all day and spending several days posting at our rate has excluded us from taking these on.
With TriCaster I can hold our hourly/daily rate and land a few more of these type gigs because we can do more for less.

For much more discussion I'd rather take it off forum. At least till I own the market. :D

All this is exciting to hear. Happy for you, Ted! :thumbsup:
-PeterG

NVentive
01-29-2008, 08:37 AM
Hey Ted --

'Sympathize with you on the 220. We did a show a few years ago where some distros wired for 110 got hooked in 220. The smoke machines worked really great that day....

Reed.Roth
01-29-2008, 07:30 PM
I just bought 2 TriCaster Studios and created an account with Limelight Networks. Our first event is Februrary 10th. Thanks for all the good advice on this thread.

CreatvGnius
01-29-2008, 08:03 PM
I just bought 2 TriCaster Studios and created an account with Limelight Networks. Our first event is Februrary 10th. Thanks for all the good advice on this thread.
Congrats to you, Reed!
-PeterG

Zack033
02-17-2008, 11:38 AM
I had a few questions concerning what I might need to prepare for in the event of problems. The reason why I am asked this is because I am totally new to the whole try Castro thing. As well as live broadcasting. I am actually trying to start a small video club in a small-town community. What I am looking to is possibly get the local support, to be able to do community broadcast.

You might say small-town broadcasting that involves the community in as many aspects as possible. While still at the same time trying to have an independent take on things.

Some of the things that I'm wondering are. What do I need to have prepared to take into the field? We are looking to actually do wireless cameras. So we don't have as many tables to have to run. What other type of equipment, would you suggest us bringing in on a startup programs such as this?

Also, I am not the mayor with some of the terms of which everyone uses out here. So if you would possibly use layman's terms that would be great. Like I said, I am still try to familiarize myself with all of this as well as the rest of us.

Any and all suggestions and help or greatly appreciated and welcome. If anyone would like to contact me please ask for the information now will be more than happy to give it to you. Like I said, I am just trying to get a program up and running as best as possible and with as little flaws as possible.

Thank you:help:

CreatvGnius
02-17-2008, 09:29 PM
I had a few questions concerning what I might need to prepare for in the event of problems.

Welcome to the TriCaster™ fold, Zack!
I'm willing to start you off with the first entry into a list of needed items.
1. Invest in an U.P.S. (Uninterruptible Power Supply) that's hefty enough to at least power your TriCaster and Display (i.e., Computer Monitor). An U.P.S. is readily available at most any large box computer store (Circuit City, Best Buy, even Jef Kethley Blaine Holmes (among other great VT Dealers) etc., etc.) and for goodness' sakes, Zack, use it!
2. Back up your recordings with some form of video tape or video disk recording device (at least have tape running in "RECORD" mode inside each camera being used in the multi-camera shoot, so you'll have "backup" recordings.
3.Use the same length camera cable for each of the cameras connected together for a live-switch so as to make it far, far easier to come up with a respectable degree of matching the colors for each of the connected cameras.
4.Don't think that high quality, wireless audio and video transmission to your switcher (or TriCaster™) is necessarily gonna' be real cheap or without fuss...
-PeterG

CreatvGnius
02-17-2008, 09:35 PM
Feel free to add more, folks...
-PeterG

Dhruv
02-19-2008, 10:11 AM
I just bought 2 TriCaster Studios and created an account with Limelight Networks. Our first event is Februrary 10th. Thanks for all the good advice on this thread.


How did it go buddy?

ted
03-06-2008, 10:28 PM
We're still waiting on approval on our first 2, 1 hour videos we did.

But I wanted to show how we transformed our Motor Home into a control room just outside the facility.
Note the 25" Sony program monitor top left, BU Deck to the right and that decks monitor to the right of that.
I also have a camera showing the entire set, (camera men and all) feeding the small monitor bottom left. This helped when I was communicating with the crew especially during set-up and rehearsal.
The biggest thing I need to address is communications. I rented a GREAT wireless intercom, but it was $300 for the week.

Here is a picture of the "Control Room".
I lied. :( I'll try again later.