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skywalker113
11-22-2007, 01:19 AM
Hello, I am very new to lightwave. I am wondering how people create 3d animation video clips. I have found out how to animate somthing in layout, with only the 3 second time span they give you. I belive they only give you 60 slides. They dont give you anytime at all of create a whole show. Can somone please tell me how it really works?

grn
11-22-2007, 01:33 AM
frame amount setting is next to the keyframeline. from 'Render / Render Globals' you set the frames that will be rendered.

SplineGod
11-22-2007, 03:31 AM
You can set the number of frames you want that are more or less then the amount set by default. If youre going to create an animation you typically want to have a story, create a storyboard, determine the timing of each shot on the board and create your animations based on that and then edit it all together.

ben martin
11-22-2007, 04:36 AM
I belive they only give you 60 slides.
Just click in that END FRAME "60" box and type there any number you want. Then you'll get a new range from fame "0" (zero) to that new input (frame) value you just entered at the END FRAME BOX.

hrgiger
11-22-2007, 10:16 AM
They actually only give you about 2 seconds, going off of 30fps. As Ben said, just change the end frame number to whatever you want.
Oh, and give the manual a try. It explains a lot of basics that you'll find useful.

skywalker113
11-22-2007, 12:23 PM
You can set the number of frames you want that are more or less then the amount set by default. If youre going to create an animation you typically want to have a story, create a storyboard, determine the timing of each shot on the board and create your animations based on that and then edit it all together.

How do you create a storyboard?

iconoclasty
11-22-2007, 12:56 PM
Making a storyboard (http://accad.osu.edu/womenandtech/Storyboard%20Resource/)

google (http://www.google.com)

Surrealist.
11-22-2007, 01:08 PM
A storyboard (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storyboard) is just a simple series of sketches that can be any form of detail you are capable of drawing. They can be one full page or a series of frames on a page. Here is a page with some templates (http://images.google.com/images?q=Storyboard+templates&hl=en&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=X&oi=images&ct=title) to give you an example.

The idea of your story board is to plot out either the pivotal shots in a sequence or each and every camera angle that will be edited. If you have a large crew the storyboard is crucial. If you are a one man operation it is merely a visual aid to first sketch out your ideas before you commit it to animation or film. For a larger crew it becomes not only that but a visual reference point for all involved. Then there is the animatic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storyboard) which can take it to another level to check overall timing. They can be stills or partial animations or both.

Some people actually take still cameras and shoot at possible locations to make a storyboard.

But in order to make an effective storyboard it is a good idea to understand cinematography and have actually done it. A great way to get experience and be able to understand cinematography in animation is to do it in the real world. You don't have to but it is a good way. Either way you should understand the language of film: shots, cuts, and so on. What can they do and how to they effect the overal product.

Two good books are:

The Five C's of Cinematography (http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/custom/portlets/recordDetails/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=ED051624&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=ED051624)

and

The Technique of Film Editing (http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/custom/portlets/recordDetails/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=ED051624&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=ED051624)

There are other simpler books around also that cover the basics.

For LightWave training try here. (http://members.shaw.ca/lightwavetutorials%20/Main_Menu.htm)

Surrealist.
11-22-2007, 01:09 PM
Making a storyboard (http://accad.osu.edu/womenandtech/Storyboard%20Resource/)

google (http://www.google.com)

Great resource! :thumbsup:

SplineGod
11-22-2007, 03:02 PM
How do you create a storyboard?

I would buy a book or two on the animation process in general. Most will explain the process from concept to finished animation. Most deal with character animation but the process is the same regardless if youre animating a character or a ship. Heres some useful links:
http://www.justdisney.com/animation/animation.html
http://www.pixar.com/howwedoit/index.html
http://www.comet-cartoons.com/3ddocs/animprocess/
http://www.amazon.com/Animation-Book-Complete-Filmmaking-Flip-Books/dp/0517886022

skywalker113
11-22-2007, 05:44 PM
Thanks everyone for the advice. One more thing, is there a way to put diffrent scenes together?

SplineGod
11-22-2007, 08:59 PM
Load from scene command is one way.

Tom Wood
11-22-2007, 09:27 PM
One more thing, is there a way to put diffrent scenes together?

As Larry mentioned there is a way to collect scenes together in a single LightWave scene, but it's generally not done that way. In very rough terms there are three types of software used to put together an animated video. The animation software, compositing software, and editing software. Each are crafted to be really good at their specific task. There's enough overlap that you might get by without a specific program for compositing. For example, you could make a background scene in LightWave and load that into a new scene where your character performs in the foreground, compositing the two together to make a new scene.

To put shots in order it's really much easier to use a dedicated editing program. And again, if you work with file formats that support alpha transparency, you can also composite in the editing program. SpeedEdit and VT5 seem to be popular choices for editing around here, dunno why. :D