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View Full Version : Another Q from newbie: color grad on Y-axis



AreDub_3D
10-31-2007, 08:10 PM
I've been spending a few hours trying to get a color gradient applied on the y-axis of a landscape object so that I get white on the mountain tops and greens and browns in the valleys ... that way it will work with the displacement map, no?

Seems like whatever I do, only the end color ends up in the render (I can invert values to toggle!). What am I doing wrong? I thought it was a scaling issue, and that the colors were to far apart, so I tried narrowing down the scale (to .0125!), but to no avail. (See attached).

Can anyone tell me what I may be doing wrong?

AreDub_3D
10-31-2007, 08:39 PM
Oops - here's the file I meant to upload ...

zapper1998
10-31-2007, 09:11 PM
it looks like you need to insert a bigger number on the gradient end value
that tells the gradient the scale
how high is the object? 20 meters
then put 20 meters in the end value
and start from there
you might have to rescale the gradient after

hope that helps

AreDub_3D
10-31-2007, 09:43 PM
Thanks. I think the default was 0 to 1.0, but I tried squeezing it down to where you see it in the screen grab in order to shrink the scale.

The tutorials I've seen stared with planes in the mm range, so I started with one that's 500x500mm. And I set the default unit to mm. Does this affect the gradient scaling?

Also, I'm attaching a render with the gradient on the x axis ... looks like the scaling should be just about right if they were translated to the y-axis, no?

Anyway, I'll go ahead and try setting the scale to 1 ... and then maybe 100! And am I right to use repeat and not constant?

By the way, there's no auto-scale for gradients is there? lol

Maybe I should start over with a new gradient ...

Giacomo99
11-01-2007, 09:10 AM
Here is something I do sometimes: do a screen cap of the side view, crop it to the edges of the model and then apply that as a Planar map to the y-axis. Click on the "Automatic Size" button and look at the numbers. That will tell you how big the gradient will need to be.