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Igeeky1
10-24-2007, 08:05 AM
Another newbie question.

I set a key at 0 set another at 60 (no changes).
Set another at 120 (180 degree rotation)
Set another at 180 (no changes)
Set another at 240 (back to original position)

So the questions are as follows:
Why does the object rotate at all between 0 and 60 now?
Same ? and answer I asume for between 120 and 180.

How can I control the direction of rotation between 60 and 120 as well as 180 and 240?

Please note, while full answers are great, I don't really expect them, something to the tune of look up "this certain phrase" is good as well. Guess I'm too new to figure out the phrase though :)

Ztreem
10-24-2007, 08:46 AM
This is because LW uses TCB splines between keys as default. Select your object and go to the graph editor and select all your channels in the right upper window and select all points in the left window with all the splines, select them by dragging a box around all points with right mouse button pressed. Now set the incoming curve to linear down in the left corner. I hope this helps.

Igeeky1
10-24-2007, 09:02 AM
Thanks Mikael,

Is there a way to change the default setting from TCB to Linear? Would be helpful for the envlopes on this project as well, wouldn't have to go back and change them all one by one.

Otterman
10-24-2007, 09:23 AM
i think within the graph editor-go to options (o) and theres a default curve setting there! Dunno-im twiddling my thumbs rendering!

loki74
10-24-2007, 09:27 AM
wouldn't have to go back and change them all one by one.

On a side note (just so you know), you can select multiple keys in the graph editor and modify their TCB values and curve type (ie, set all to linear).

Exception
10-24-2007, 09:40 AM
You usually don't want linear movement unless you're doing something mechanical. Natural movements are not linear.

I actually never set my curves to linear, but if movement before or after a keyframe is not desired, I set the T of the TCB (Tension) of the start and end keyframes to 1.0 in the graph editor. That way you get a great ease-in and ease-out smooth motion (grease-in grease-out :) ), without any movement outside of the keyframes.

I gather you're a flash-person :) Tweening... ha. ;)

Igeeky1
10-24-2007, 10:01 AM
Thanks to all, system moving slow speed ahead once again! Ended up using the T=1.0 on TCB, figure this will help me more in the future.

I swear the more I get into this, the more I feel guilty paying only $19 for any movie with more than 2 seconds of CG...

Ztreem
10-24-2007, 10:06 AM
Thanks Mikael,

Is there a way to change the default setting from TCB to Linear? Would be helpful for the envlopes on this project as well, wouldn't have to go back and change them all one by one.

Yes it is. As Otterman said; go to the Graph Editor and press 'o' or go the the 'more' tab and go to 'graph editor options'. Change the default incoming curve to linear.:thumbsup:


I gather you're a flash-person Tweening... ha.

I was thinking the same. :D

Igeeky1
10-24-2007, 11:35 AM
News Flash, this movie will probably end up as swf eventually as well :(

Once I start learning some 3d terminology I might actually have a better chance of looking things up. Right now it's even hard to do searches because I don't know quite what to call things.

Thanks for all the help! :)

Surrealist.
10-24-2007, 01:02 PM
That is a problem because you can only search based on not only what it is called but how it is in the manual.

Having a reference manual only is no way to learn CG.

You need to start with a list of key words that need to be defined. But you also need to have a good place to find the definitions. So I don't know if anyone has put together such a list but you can find the definitions in the Glossary of CG terminology found at the appendix section of the Lightwave 8 Manual.

Obviously you won't need to define everything here but if you can skim though these terms A to Z and find the terms that seem to be useful.

If the definition is not suitable, search for it in the manual and here on the forums until you have examples that give an adequate explanation.
Terms you are not sure are used often or useful to you right away you can search for them as above.

After you do this you will have a good basic grasp of the terminology of this area of study.

Then continue to do tutorials and get some hands-on experience with how to do things and why from people who have been doing it.

And finally, go though the entire LW manual and give yourself little examples as you go, things to do to try out the various aspects of the program. By this time you should know if there are any areas you know you won't be using and you can skip those.

If you don't have the LW 8 manual with the Glossary see if you can get one from NT or I can email it to you. It is a 64 meg file zipped.

You can send me a private message with your email if you need the file.

loki74
10-24-2007, 02:18 PM
You usually don't want linear movement unless you're doing something mechanical. Natural movements are not linear.

I actually never set my curves to linear, but if movement before or after a keyframe is not desired, I set the T of the TCB (Tension) of the start and end keyframes to 1.0 in the graph editor. That way you get a great ease-in and ease-out smooth motion (grease-in grease-out :) ), without any movement outside of the keyframes.

I gather you're a flash-person :) Tweening... ha. ;)

Agreed.

Actually, even for mechanics, pure linear is totally nonphysical--it would imply a discontinuous velocity curve, which really can't happen.

I do, however, use linear in cases where I'm not animating anything physical at all--for example, I used a whole lot of linear curves when animating a credit roll