PDA

View Full Version : IVGA is Working Perfectly... and it's killing me!



emptyspaces
09-27-2007, 12:16 PM
Becuase as long as iVGA works, there seems to be little interest in supplying VGA/DVI input connectivity.

I've got this great piece of equipement that does all these things with little setup... but it all means nothing when the client walks to the control table and says... Can I have the remote for the projector, I think it needs to be focused...

If you can help me come up with the answer to this question I would appreciate it because right now it's: The projectors are focused. I know that your power point presentation is the meat of the meeting, and it's too bad that it's unledgible, but look at those camera angles... and: I bet you haven't seen effects like this since the 80's!

What would be useful; and I dont think I'm alone, is to slide a vga input into the back of the box.. (perhaps you could use the space currently being taken up by the unusable VGA connectors already there), and allow us the final piece to a great production: clarity of text from a powerpoint, keynote or any other type of presentation on the "boss's" computer.

You have fixed the requests for 16:9, quicktime and other video support.. you have even increased the amount of camera inputs to 6... I never saw that request but thank you!

Please! Please allow us to distribute as close to 1:1 resolution from other computers by providing a switchable DVI or VGA input.

Seth

billmi
09-27-2007, 01:49 PM
VGA/DVI input is going to give you the same issues - if you create a powerpoint with graphics that are too detailed to be readable when scaled down to Standard Definition video resolution to pass through the switcher, then they will be unreadable whether they get there by iVGA, VGA or DVI.

VT has a VGA keyer interface (I thought Tricaster did too, I could be mistaken.) Through the VGA Keyer you can choose what goes to the VGA output - Switcher output scaled up from SD to VGA, The iVGA input still at VGA resolution, or the iVGA signal at VGA resolution keyed over the scaled up Switcher output.

Paul Lara
09-27-2007, 03:43 PM
Seth, if you tap the Esc key it will send the computer image to the projector in pristine clarity. It's only when you need to scan convert that image to blend with video that there is an inevitable loss of sharpness.

Tarheel Cougar
10-03-2007, 11:27 AM
The Send to VGA out is a nice trick. It also lets you use cutaways of audience members without disrupting the presentation on the projection screen. I have seen some external scan converters give what I think is a crisper picture than Tricaster in scaling down the resolution but that involves more equipment and more expense--you can try that route. Of course when you are recording the presentation to DV tape you are stuck at NTSC resolution anyway, that's a limitation until Tricaster HD is released (ha).
Then again, it's always worth telling presenters that 8 pt Curlz MT is not a good idea either. I don't understand how people can figure out how to use Powerpoint templates but not understand that even though you can read the text on your computer screen, your audience won't be able to see it 10 feet or more away so you need to use a bigger font.

Blairness
11-02-2007, 07:51 AM
Seth, if you tap the Esc key it will send the computer image to the projector in pristine clarity. It's only when you need to scan convert that image to blend with video that there is an inevitable loss of sharpness.

Would it be possible and benificial if the TC could automatically switch to "straight from iVGA" when the iVGA signal is the only thing being displayed? (when a transition to/from video is occuring, the loss of resolution should not be an issue).

The main issue I can think of that may arise if my suggested solution was implemented, would be a noticeable 'cut' between iVGA res. and video res. when a transition starts or ends. However if this would indeed be an issue, I'm sure the same thing must happen now "if you tap the Esc key" as you mention, right?

...Bring on that Tricaster HD ;)
...With HDMI inputs (please no: "everything compatible with me is far too expensive" SDI). Actually, put SDI on it if you feel the urge, just make sure it has HDMI as well! ...Oh and I suppose you may as well add analogue component HD inputs ...Hey what the heck: copy the TC studio's input panel, upgrade the component inputs so they can handle HD and add an HDMI input for each channel :thumbsup:

PIZAZZ
11-02-2007, 11:21 AM
Would it be possible and benificial if the TC could automatically switch to "straight from iVGA" when the iVGA signal is the only thing being displayed? (when a transition to/from video is occuring, the loss of resolution should not be an issue).

The main issue I can think of that may arise if my suggested solution was implemented, would be a noticeable 'cut' between iVGA res. and video res. when a transition starts or ends. However if this would indeed be an issue, I'm sure the same thing must happen now "if you tap the Esc key" as you mention, right?

...Bring on that Tricaster HD ;)
...With HDMI inputs (please no: "everything compatible with me is far too expensive" SDI). Actually, put SDI on it if you feel the urge, just make sure it has HDMI as well! ...Oh and I suppose you may as well add analogue component HD inputs ...Hey what the heck: copy the TC studio's input panel, upgrade the component inputs so they can handle HD and add an HDMI input for each channel :thumbsup:

Please no HDMI for me. I don't want to be tied down to short cable runs and none of my clients do either.

Give me HD-SDI and a good coax any day.

Blairness
11-03-2007, 06:30 AM
Please no HDMI for me. I don't want to be tied down to short cable runs and none of my clients do either.

Give me HD-SDI and a good coax any day.

Mmmm, you are right :foreheads. I never really researched the logistics fully (which I have now) I was thinking you could use a "HDMI over cat5" (or similar) system for long cable lengths, however it would cost around the same amount to just convert the HDMI signal to HD-SDI anyway. HD Component would still be handy though wouldn't it? :o

ej4 west
11-08-2007, 03:37 PM
Seth, if you tap the Esc key it will send the computer image to the projector in pristine clarity. It's only when you need to scan convert that image to blend with video that there is an inevitable loss of sharpness.

We use ivga to run powerpoint and we chroma key the presenter over the power point. When I hit the Esc key the powerpoint looks beautiful and it fits in the full screen just the way I want it. The problem is when I do that my presenter dissapears. For now we just put him over the ivga before hitting Esc, but I would rather have the better picture quality and full screen. Is there any way to key the presenter over the ivga after making it full screen? If there is not a way than it would be a helpful tool.

Thanks

Blairness
11-09-2007, 03:47 AM
We use ivga to run powerpoint and we chroma key the presenter over the power point. When I hit the Esc key the powerpoint looks beautiful and it fits in the full screen just the way I want it. The problem is when I do that my presenter dissapears. For now we just put him over the ivga before hitting Esc, but I would rather have the better picture quality and full screen. Is there any way to key the presenter over the ivga after making it full screen? If there is not a way than it would be a helpful tool.

Thanks

I havn't had extensive use of a TC before, however what I gather from the flow chart: http://www.newtek.com/tricaster/tricaster_studio.php is that the keying of video over iVGA is done at video resolution. It appears that it would be physically impossible for it to do what you want, without more hardware (an XGA res. keyer). Having said that, the flow chart does show an "XGA keyer" with program video and iVGA running into it, I just don't know what that is actually capable of doing (someone with more experience using a TC I'm sure will be able to help more).

Just a side note: How do you manage to key the presenter over the powerpoint? What I mean is, do they stand in front of a big ugly green screen while they are presenting to the audience or what?... I guess it depends a lot on what exactly you are shooting as to whether it is "big" and "ugly"...?

ej4 west
11-09-2007, 09:20 AM
Just a side note: How do you manage to key the presenter over the powerpoint? What I mean is, do they stand in front of a big ugly green screen while they are presenting to the audience or what?... I guess it depends a lot on what exactly you are shooting as to whether it is "big" and "ugly"...?

Thanks for the advice.

We don't do live siminars. We record in studio in front of the green screen and post the classes on our website. http://www.ej4.com

Blairness
11-10-2007, 03:19 PM
Thanks for the advice.

We don't do live siminars. We record in studio in front of the green screen and post the classes on our website. http://www.ej4.com

Why do you need a high resolution output when you are only using it for video?

Blairness
11-12-2007, 08:52 PM
Edited for clarity in red:

Would it be possible and benificial if the TC could automatically switch to "straight from iVGA" when the iVGA signal is the only thing being displayed? (when a transition to/from video is occuring, the loss of resolution should not be an issue).

The main issue I can think of that may arise if my suggested solution was implemented, would be a noticeable 'cut' between iVGA res. and video res. when a transition from iVGA starts or to iVGA ends. However if this would indeed be an issue, I'm sure the same thing must happen now "if you tap the Esc key" as you mention, right?


Reading through this thread again, I can see that this solution would NOT ALWAYS be beneficial (eg. when Tarheel Cougar wants to do cutaways of audience members without disrupting the presentation on the projection screen), however it WOULD be benificial MOST of the time, so maybe there could still be the "Send to VGA out" tick box, that when it isn't ticked the TC performs as in my suggested solution, and when it is ticked the iVGA stays routed to the VGA output, regardless of what is on the program bus of the video switcher.

Also, in regards to my mention of "The main issue I can think of that may arise if my suggested solution was implemented", this issue could be addressed by having another 'switch' (maybe another tick box) that gives you the option of either having the 'cut' happen the way I mention in my edited quote above (so the transition is shown on both the VGA output and the video output), or happen the opposite way: when a transition from iVGA ends, or when a transition to iVGA starts (so the transition is only shown on the video output, but you don't get the cut between the iVGA input at different resolutions).
Of course, this issue doesn't exist if you only use cuts to and from iVGA.

GaryG
11-22-2007, 08:17 AM
Seth, if you tap the Esc key it will send the computer image to the projector in pristine clarity. It's only when you need to scan convert that image to blend with video that there is an inevitable loss of sharpness.

I don't have my Tricaster in front of me, so I can't confirm, but I believe shift+escape does a dissolve to full-resolution iVGA.

Resolution is great and all, but there's also the problem of frame rate. Presenters like to use transitions, animations, and embedded video. Tricaster is a great SD solution for *video,* but it just isn't a great box for corporate presentation work.

Blairness
11-23-2007, 02:14 AM
I don't have my Tricaster in front of me, so I can't confirm, but I believe shift+escape does a dissolve to full-resolution iVGA.

Interesting to learn another thing about the tricaster seems I don't have one to play around with myself and there is very limited information available on the website (no user manual or anything). How do you do that without using the keyboard shortcut? (not that I really know the interface very well, due to lack of information available and minimal past experience with the product)


Resolution is great and all, but there's also the problem of frame rate. Presenters like to use transitions, animations, and embedded video. Tricaster is a great SD solution for *video,* but it just isn't a great box for corporate presentation work.

I'm a bit confused here so just wanted to clarify some things:
1. What is the "problem of frame rate"?
2. What is the problem when using "transitions, animations, and embedded video"?
I'm interested to know why you think "it just isn't a great box for corporate presentation work", so some clarification on these things would be great.

Kurt_Henning
11-26-2007, 09:53 AM
I am not sure about this, but in my experience, iVGA is great for still graphics from PowerPoint and other "static" presentations, but in my experience we are unable to get a high enough framerate/bandwidth to make motion graphics passable. If we patch iVGA and a client wants to play back a DVD clip from their laptop, I would argue that they should give me the DVD and I would play it back from their cue, and the image would be optimal. Otherwise, the DVD would have to be scaled from the laptops resolution to standard definition and then sent over the ethernet.

If the presenters are doing all static graphics, then they can use the laptop at a podium without wires (using a wireless hub/router). This part is very cool. We have been displaying computer graphics at conferences for over a decade. We still own a VGA splitter that will take a VGA signal, amplify it and send it between 100 and 250 feet to the projectors. Back in the day, we would have to use remotes and manually switch the projector input from the live feed (generally composite) to the VGA input. This was glitch switching, and provided no way to record the image, only to display it. The image quality was quite good this way. Along this path we used a variety of black boxes and scan convertors, line doublers and such to allow us to record the computer graphics and avoid the "glitch switching." There were quality issues (image degradation) due to the VGA to NTSC conversion.

iVGA is great for what it does. We use it for our live events. We have a hardwire and wireless solution for clients. The most important thing is to know what the content actually is. Depending on the amount of motion graphics will determine whether to let the presenter playback a clip, or allow the TD to do their job, and get the best image quality on the screen.

Lastly, the button that bypasses the switcher and routes the signal to the projector is the best possible quality, but then you cannot record this output, you can still record the audio and other input sources, but not the VGA signal itself.

On TCS and VT5 you can have more than 1 iVGA source available on a channel, but you cannot switch from 2 iVGA sources. You can only use one at a time. So, just like in VT4 when we would have to switch laptops between presenters, we simply cut to a show graphic playing back in a DDR, patch from the 1st iVGA source to the 2nd source, check it in preview, and you are ready to go. Dissolve from show graphic back to the new laptop signal.

I hope that these are some of the issues that GaryG was touching on.

iVGA is a neat product/feature, but you need to know when to use it, and when there is a better solution to display the media.

In closing, the final use for iVGA is when you need to record a slide show and add a soundtrack. When we do dance recitals and gigs like that, they often start with a powerpoint that some dad made. These usually have a variety of problems, but we are only trying to capture them, not fix them. In the past we used to export all the images to pngs, throw them in the editor, use the VT's dissolve, because nothing is more visually horrifying to me than the "dissolve" in Powerpoint. It's just awful looking. I wonder while they use it as a "Standard." Also back in the day, PLAY used to make some product called "Gadgets" or something like that and they had a "PowerPoint" killer, and it had a dissolve like one would expect. Anyhoo, we would export all the pictures and effectivley re-edit the piece and add the soundtrack. This was a value added service and works as long as the pictures have a common length. If I have to go into the project and adjust all the times, then that is editing (even though I can use toolshed and knock it out in no time).

Having the ability to record the VGA input from an external source can save a lot of time. My last thought would be that I usually "dumb down" the laptop resolution to 800 X 600 so the iVGA scalar does not have to work as hard by compressing high resolutions like 1600 X 1200.

I haven't posted in a while, I guess I have a few thoughts.:goodluck:

D3Cast
11-26-2007, 12:08 PM
My last thought would be that I usually "dumb down" the laptop resolution to 800 X 600 so the iVGA scalar does not have to work as hard by compressing high resolutions like 1600 X 1200.I've posted this before, so I'm sorry for the repeat, but when you have complete control over the source machine you're using over iVGA, depending on its display adapter and your supply of patience, you can use PowerStrip (http://www.entechtaiwan.com/ps.htm) to set your display resolution to 720x486 (for NTSC) and (seemingly, although I've never had this confirmed) bypass the scaler altogether. I've, personally, found significant sharpening of graphics using this method.

Or it could be my new contacts.

-steve

Blairness
11-27-2007, 07:01 AM
I am not sure about this, but in my experience, iVGA is great for still graphics from PowerPoint and other "static" presentations, but in my experience we are unable to get a high enough framerate/bandwidth to make motion graphics passable.

Can anyone else confirm whether or not this is the case in their situation as well? I know it all comes down to how fast your connection can be, however do motion graphics usually never work properly, or does it only occur on networks that are already reasonably loaded? As has been discussed, having a straight VGA input on the Tricaster (lets make it DVI-I) would solve this issue (besides the issue of having to find/lay cable).


If we patch iVGA and a client wants to play back a DVD clip from their laptop, I would argue that they should give me the DVD and I would play it back from their cue, and the image would be optimal. Otherwise, the DVD would have to be scaled from the laptops resolution to standard definition and then sent over the ethernet.

Don't quite understand this; A DVD is already SD, so why would/how can it be scaled to SD before it goes over the network? Anyway, can you not even run motion graphics over iVGA at SD?... Is this the norm everyone?


Lastly, the button that bypasses the switcher and routes the signal to the projector is the best possible quality, but then you cannot record this output, you can still record the audio and other input sources, but not the VGA signal itself.

So just confirming; If you 'press' that button so that the iVGA is routed straight to the VGA out, you cannot then select iVGA as a source on the video switcher until you 'unpress' that button? Seems rather silly, if that is the case. (I'm actually getting really getting sick of 'confirming' things with people when I wouldn't have to if a manual was available on the website :thumbsdow ... No fault of yours of course :D I just had to vent my annoyance :thumbsup: )



On TCS and VT5 you can have more than 1 iVGA source available on a channel(what is a "channel"? Or should I replace "on a channel" with "at a time"?), but you cannot switch from (I presume "from" is supposed to be "between"?) 2 iVGA sources. You can only use one at a time. So, just like in VT4 when we would have to switch laptops between presenters, we simply cut to a show graphic playing back in a DDR, patch from the 1st iVGA source to the 2nd source, check it in preview, and you are ready to go. Dissolve from show graphic back to the new laptop signal.

I agree (if I've interpreted what you were saying there right!?) that it would be nice to be able to switch between iVGA inputs. However as you point out there are ways around it... which are probably better solutions than creating the issues/extra cost etc. if it was implemented. ie. You would need 2 iVGA processors (which would either use more system resources or add more hardware, depending on whether the processor is software/firmware or hardware based?); you would have even MORE bandwidth issues! (2 iVGA signals running on the network at the same time {I presume/hope that isn't the case already}); etc.


...use the VT's dissolve, because nothing is more visually horrifying to me than the "dissolve" in Powerpoint. It's just awful looking. I wonder while they use it as a "Standard." Also back in the day, PLAY used to make some product called "Gadgets" or something like that and they had a "PowerPoint" killer, and it had a dissolve like one would expect.

Haha, nothing like going off on a tangent :jester:, usually get that when people are talking, however it's even more entertaining in written form :jester: (I hide my tangents by putting them in brackets so they are a bit more subtle :jester: {why isn't there a normal 'laughing' "smily"? This 'jester' one just doesn't really cut it}).
BTW... You do realise there is a "fade" (as opposed to "dissolve") transition in PPT right?



My last thought would be that I usually "dumb down" the laptop resolution to 800 X 600 so the iVGA scalar does not have to work as hard by compressing high resolutions like 1600 X 1200.

Don't quote me on this, but I'd say the scalar (I presume you mean the one feeding the video switcher?) would be doing practically the same amount of work scaling 800X600 as it would with 1600X1200. I'll probably be proven wrong though.


I haven't posted in a while, I guess I have a few thoughts.:goodluck:

Just a few... :jester:

Blairness
11-27-2007, 07:06 AM
I've posted this before, so I'm sorry for the repeat, but when you have complete control over the source machine you're using over iVGA, depending on its display adapter and your supply of patience, you can use PowerStrip (http://www.entechtaiwan.com/ps.htm) to set your display resolution to 720x486 (for NTSC) and (seemingly, although I've never had this confirmed) bypass the scaler altogether. I've, personally, found significant sharpening of graphics using this method.

Or it could be my new contacts.

-steve

Good suggestion, thanks. Wouldn't work as well if you were wanting to have high res. VGA on the VGA output.

billmi
11-27-2007, 12:33 PM
Seems rather silly, if that is the case. (I'm actually getting really getting sick of 'confirming' things with people when I wouldn't have to if a manual was available on the website :thumbsdow ... No fault of yours of course :D I just had to vent my annoyance :thumbsup: )


ftp://ftp.newtek.com/pub/TriCaster/

Blairness
11-28-2007, 03:42 AM
ftp://ftp.newtek.com/pub/TriCaster/

Am I blind, or is there no link on the website to that?!

billmi
11-28-2007, 06:51 AM
Yep, but it takes some digging to find. It's not in the Tricaster section of the web site. It's in the Support section. If you search the Tricaster support FAQs for "manual" it's in the fourth or fifth FAQ.

chuckd
11-28-2007, 03:26 PM
Can anyone else confirm whether or not this is the case in their situation as well? I know it all comes down to how fast your connection can be, however do motion graphics usually never work properly, or does it only occur on networks that are already reasonably loaded?

I have yet to see full motion video or graphics run smoothly under iVGA.

chuckd
11-28-2007, 03:32 PM
Don't quite understand this; A DVD is already SD, so why would/how can it be scaled to SD before it goes over the network? Anyway, can you not even run motion graphics over iVGA at SD?... Is this the norm everyone?

Yes, but when you play it off a laptop it's either in an NTSC sized window (read *not* full screen) or it's being scaled up to fit the whole laptop screen. It's then being forced down the network cable to the TriCaster which then either passes that along to the VGA output or scales it *back* down to send out the video output.

Either way there is a much better way to push a DVD through the TC-- and that's by simply plugging in a standard set top DVD player into one of the video inputs on the TC. If you want SD output then it looks great and if you want VGA output then it looks like a scaled up DVD (which is what you would get by playing it from a laptop anyway).

chuckd
11-28-2007, 03:35 PM
So just confirming; If you 'press' that button so that the iVGA is routed straight to the VGA out, you cannot then select iVGA as a source on the video switcher until you 'unpress' that button? Seems rather silly, if that is the case. (I'm actually getting really getting sick of 'confirming' things with people when I wouldn't have to if a manual was available on the website :thumbsdow ... No fault of yours of course :D I just had to vent my annoyance :thumbsup:

No, you can still use the iVGA feed into the switcher for the standard video output. But what you cannot do while that button is pressed is put any SD or TC generated material on the VGA output.

Blairness
11-28-2007, 11:17 PM
Yep, but it takes some digging to find. It's not in the Tricaster section of the web site. It's in the Support section. If you search the Tricaster support FAQs for "manual" it's in the fourth or fifth FAQ.

Aha. Well you don't need to call me blind for not finding that! Why is it that Newtec seem to want to keep that sort of thing to their current customers? I know of no other company that keeps that sort of thing from prospective customers, so just intrigued to know their reasons. Actually, they didn't keep it from me anyway (do they realise I can download it?). In that FAQ reply they say "If you are a current owner of Tricaster or Tricaster pro, and would like to download the electronic format of the manuals, please visit the following URL: ftp://ftp.newtek.com/pub/TriCaster/." Well I'm not a current owner and I visited there so did I do something I'm not supposed to or what?!

BTW I forgot to thank you for that link, so here's me saying thanks for it! :thumbsup:

Blairness
11-28-2007, 11:31 PM
I have yet to see full motion video or graphics run smoothly under iVGA.

Very valuable information, thanks. Good (or bad depending on how you look at it :tongue:) to have it confirmed that that is the common experience. I can now see that the TC desparately needs a real VGA/DVI input. Unless of course you have a Gig network (actually the TC probably doesn't have a Gig capable network card anyway so that probably won't help). There are definately benefits to iVGA and I think it is a great idea, however there are also some major flaws to it as well that can render the high res. capabilities of the TC useless in a lot of situations. I think if a DVI input was added it would greatly increase the value of the Tricaster as a system.

Blairness
11-28-2007, 11:45 PM
Yes, but when you play it off a laptop it's either in an NTSC sized window (read *not* full screen) or it's being scaled up to fit the whole laptop screen. It's then being forced down the network cable to the TriCaster which then either passes that along to the VGA output or scales it *back* down to send out the video output.

Either way there is a much better way to push a DVD through the TC-- and that's by simply plugging in a standard set top DVD player into one of the video inputs on the TC. If you want SD output then it looks great and if you want VGA output then it looks like a scaled up DVD (which is what you would get by playing it from a laptop anyway).

Ok I think I got confused by the fact that Kurt said "Otherwise, the DVD would have to be scaled from the laptops resolution to standard definition and then sent over the ethernet." hence my reply. I presume he meant "...after being sent over the ethernet." Just a break down in communication there I guess.

Blairness
11-29-2007, 12:48 AM
No, you can still use the iVGA feed into the switcher for the standard video output.

Thanks, I suspected that was the case.

With that in mind, lets go back to Kurt's post: "Lastly, the button that bypasses the switcher and routes the signal to the projector is the best possible quality, but then you cannot record this output, you can still record the audio and other input sources, but not the VGA signal itself." I now presume he means that you cannot record off the VGA output? (as opposed to my previous presumption that he meant you can't record the iVGA input) So my response in light of that is: why does he want to record off the VGA output?... You can record all sources through the video switcher; and resolution can't be the reason unless he is wanting to record at a higher resolution than video. What other reason/s am I missing here?


But what you cannot do while that button is pressed is put any SD or TC generated material on the VGA output.

Why would you want to? Isn't that what 'unpressing' the button is for?!

D3Cast
11-29-2007, 07:36 PM
Unless of course you have a Gig network (actually the TC probably doesn't have a Gig capable network card anyway so that probably won't help).No, at least the TC-100 and Pros have only a 10/100 network adapter, BUT that doesn't mean you couldn't connect a USB gigabit network adapter, and potentially have gigabit throughtput that way.

Has anyone ever seen this work? If so, have you ever seen smooth full screen video over iVGA?

-s

PIZAZZ
11-29-2007, 08:52 PM
Actually some TCPros have Gigabit I believe.

As far as IVGA doing full video... Yep I saw it. Yep I have used it. Yep Yep.

I still prefer to run the DVDs locally into the VT or run a separate cable from the presentation directly to me. Nice most have a video output on their video card. Set it into dual head mirror and BAMM! video. I still run IVGA for the data side though.

Best thing was a week or so ago doing a shoot in Austin. This was at one ot the University large classrooms with a builtin AV system with a Dell. I ran my Cat5, massaged the IP addresses, and then kicked on IVGA. I was able to pick it up with no issues back at the TriCaster. It looked a little sluggish when dissolving between slides and the presenter said he felt the computer was acting really slow.

I skipped up to the podium and looked at the specs of the Dell tower. The VGA graphics adapter had 32 megs of RAM. The CPU was a P4 2.2ghz. NO wonder it was Sluggish!


Moral of this story is...... If you plan on using IVGA, check the computer specs first before you run 150' of Cat5 cable. :) :thumbsup:

Blairness
11-30-2007, 04:53 AM
I'm actually beginning to wonder whether the majority of problems people have with iVGA are actually due to the specs of the computer being used (mainly graphics card), as opposed to the network speed. Having said that, you often don't get a say in which computer is used (ie. if a speaker uses their own laptop). In those situations, that DVI input that everyone seems to want would be a valuable addition.