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View Full Version : Rendering one frame for a high rez print?



Algae998
09-08-2007, 01:30 PM
Hey all,

I just finished the final touches on my model (new to LW) and I want to have a high resolution picture that I can have made into a print/poster. My question is..how do I do this with a better setting than 640x480??
I went into Render Globals and set the output quality to 1024x768 but I dont get the quality I need. Im probably only adjusting the video output but Im not sure how to affect the Render Frame.
Also, is the Render Frame (F9) option pretty much only for render tests? Or can you actually render that frame as a .jpeg in a high rez?

Ive seen a lot of high rez model pictures people have posted all over but cant seem to figure it out. Sorry for my lack of knowledge in LW, Im still learning :D

3dpete
09-08-2007, 01:38 PM
go into your camera properties and set your resolution there.

Algae998
09-08-2007, 02:40 PM
Awesome. I just tested (F9) and saved as a JPEG. The detail is very nice, but the edges are still extremely pixely. Is there an edge smoothing option? I tried enabling the smoothing checkbox for the model's surface editor, but it really only smoothed out the model's surface.

I would have thought that a 1024x768 render would be a lot larger than 195k :)

Thanks for the reply!

Algae998
09-08-2007, 02:47 PM
Hahaha, nevermind, I figured it out :D . I took another look at the camera's property setting and increased the multiplier percentage to 200%. Love it!

pva
09-08-2007, 06:32 PM
In the camera properties you have an option called Anti Aliasing, set it to 5 or 7 and see what happens :)

Algae998
09-08-2007, 10:32 PM
Yup, thats what I was looking for alright. The 800x600 with AA of 5 turned out better than a 1024x768 without AA. For zooming in it looks great! Thanks for the heads up! Now Ill definitely have to order some prints of my model. Only down side is the render time..but its worth it.

extrabyte
09-09-2007, 08:50 AM
Also, don't forget about the Print Assistant plugin that comes with Lightwave as well as the DPI plugin from Eki.

Sarford
09-10-2007, 05:33 AM
Also, don't forget about the Print Assistant plugin that comes with Lightwave as well as the DPI plugin from Eki.


O_o ... so there is a plug-in for this kind of things?

Iain
09-10-2007, 06:40 AM
Hahaha, nevermind, I figured it out :D . I took another look at the camera's property setting and increased the multiplier percentage to 200%. Love it!

For print, you should go way higher than 1024x768. You can click in the boxes and make them whatever you want and for printing I'd make it at least 1600x1200.

Ideally you want to be closer to 3000 pixels but that's for professional level work and when you apply antialiasing, it could take a very long time to render.

Steamthrower
09-10-2007, 10:09 AM
Mind posting a screen? I always appreciate seeing first renders, seriously.

JeffrySG
09-10-2007, 10:09 AM
Generally you want to find out what resolution the printer wants. We do large format printing where I work and we usually shoot for some where between 75 and 200ppi. Then take the dimensions of the final print and multiply them by the ppi you want to use.

So if the poster was going to be 24" x 36" and the resolution was going to be 150ppi you would want to render the final image at: 3600 x 5400 for the best output.

Hope this helps.

Giacomo99
09-10-2007, 02:02 PM
Just my two cents worth: setting your AA at 5 or 7 is probably overkill. For most cases, set it at 1, check the "Adaptive Sampling" box, type "0.1" in "Threshold," and leave it there. (If you have an especially noisy render, you can try lowering the threshold to .05.) This is important for print renders because unnnecessarily high AA levels can really increase the render time for high-res renders.

Also, the industry-standard resolution for print media these days is 150 or 175 lpi (lines per inch), so your render resolution should be twice that: 300 or 350 dpi. For large images (such as posters) which are intended to be viewed at a distance, the resolution can be much lower. I've designed CD covers (1500 pixels square) which were later printed at poster size and looked fine.

Algae998
09-10-2007, 03:50 PM
Wow, didnt quite think Id get so many helpful replies:thumbsup: .
Ive been testing out a few of the suggestions. The AA of 5 took forever to render, but was worth it, especially for a poster. For my purposes (to hang em on my wall as a personal progressive porfolio and not necessarily for public demonstrations) 1600x1200 should work fine. Im planning on using cafepress.com for my prints, which Ive ordered from before, but Ill have to check into what their resolution specs are.

Like I said, Im new to the 3d modeling/animation world, and Ive only been working with Lightwave for roughly 3 or so weeks. The pictures Ive uploaded are models based on various tutorials (shiny surfaces, refraction, other cool effects) and a tutorial by Todd Grimes (DesktopImages), so the super hero model was not my original idea, although modified. Gotta give credit where credit is due. Im still learning.

pva
09-11-2007, 02:32 PM
Well, for professional printing we render the scenes in my job @ 5440x4080... you have to be very clean and careful in what you're doing if you don't want to see that the render estimated time around 30h or 40h, normally our renders finish in 14 hours more or less, now we're waiting a brand new 11.000 euros expensive computer and we're going to build a mini render farm of 2 computers via ScreamerNet.

The point of all of this is that, if you're new in this world, it's the perfect moment to learn to make things well since the beggining, believe me it's VERY important to manage your work in a clever way and not to make more or make it more complicated that it's planned to be.

Algae998
09-11-2007, 08:36 PM
Yea, I can understand why its important to have things arranged in a simple way, or else it would take forever to render scenes. Hah, Ill have to keep the high resolution size and render time in mind for the next test.
Thanks for the help!

JeffrySG
09-12-2007, 06:29 PM
Also, the industry-standard resolution for print media these days is 150 or 175 lpi (lines per inch), so your render resolution should be twice that: 300 or 350 dpi.

For offset printing yes, but not for large format inkjet output... usually they don't want more than 150 - 200ppi for files. We usually want between 75 - 150ppi where I currently work.

Again - the best thing is to check with the people outputting the file for the recommendations on resolution. I've been printing large format inkjet for over 15 years... ;)