PDA

View Full Version : The PIXLET codec



Beamtracer
06-25-2003, 11:05 PM
http://a772.g.akamai.net/7/772/51/173e20bea81d0b/www.apple.com/macosx/panther/images/index_pixlet_062303.gif
A new video codec has been introduced to Mac OS X 10.3 (Panther). The Pixar Wavelet codec, otherwise known as Pixlet. It's a 16bpc codec, meaning there are more shades of light and dark than regular 8bpc codecs.

When you create a Quicktime video with the Panther OS, you'll be able to select the Pixlet option. It is a lossless codec (no quality loss) but will still be able to make the Quicktime movie a fraction of the size of what it was before. It's intended for animators and professional users, rather than for web use.

Quote from Steve Jobs:
"We've never seen a codec like Pixlet on a personal computer," says Jobs. "Pixar requested this."

Just how Pixar makes such a request to Apple via Steve Jobs makes the mind boggle. Maybe he was talking to himself! :)

Quote from Apple's website:
Pixlet is the first studio-grade codec for filmmakers. Pixlet provides 20-25:1 compression, allowing a 75MB/sec series of frames to be delivered in a 3MB/sec movie, similar to DV data rates. Or a series of frames that are over 6GB in size can be contained within a 250MB movie. Pixlet lets high-end digital film frames play in real time with any Panther Mac, without investing in costly, proprietary playback hardware.

Some of us are familiar with the Microcosm Quicktime codec which produces similar file sizes, and has been out for a couple of years.
http://www.digitalanarchy.com/product_micro.html

toby
06-26-2003, 02:14 AM
I was just thinking about micro-cosm, great compression, but horrible playback/scrubbing - when they say Pixlet can "play in real time with any Panther Mac" does that mean even just QT player? or does it assume FCP?

Can't wait to try it, sounds cool, and free??

Beamtracer
06-26-2003, 04:16 AM
It means it plays back in full motion on any Panther Mac. It's a pretty amazing achievement. This is not web video. This is lossless 16bpc master quality video playing in real time of a standard hard drive. The catch? You have to upgrade to Panther.

Red_Oddity
06-26-2003, 05:03 AM
Small price to pay in my opinion (it even means you finally have a decent file requester...woot...)

Beamtracer
06-26-2003, 06:53 AM
Well, I previously paid the full price to purchase the Microcosm codec. It had much better quality than Apple's standard Animation codec and the file sizes were a fraction of the size of Animation. The playback wasn't very smooth, but Microcosm was a great way to render and store things. You could spend less money on blank CDs and DVD-R disks to store your animations.

Well, goodbye Microcosm. I can't see anyone in their right mind purchasing Microcosm now. You may as well put your money towards the Apple's Panther OS, and get the Pixlet codec with it.

Microcosm was, however, cross-platform. They had a Windows version. Knowing the history of Steve Jobs, I can't see him giving his new Pixlet codec to Windows users.

The Pixlet codec will be another step in reducing the price of making broadcast quality video. The other broadcast codecs require arrays of very fast hard drives raided together to handle the huge amount of data that broadcast quality video requires.

The Pixlet codec can do it in full motion off a single standard ATA drive.

mbaldwin
06-26-2003, 07:45 AM
the other question this begs, is: if Pixlet is a mac-only codec made as requested by Pixar, what type of Mac saturation will we see at Pixar in the coming year? What parts of the company will have the most use for this?

just curious.

mlinde
06-26-2003, 08:54 AM
Originally posted by Beamtracer
[IMG]Quote from Steve Jobs:
"We've never seen a codec like Pixlet on a personal computer," says Jobs. "Pixar requested this."

Just how Pixar makes such a request to Apple via Steve Jobs makes the mind boggle. Maybe he was talking to himself! :)

Even though Stevey is the CEO of both, he's got a guy a Pixar (or a few of them) who deal with technical development. These people don't always have the CEO on speed-dial, so they have to work though channels like any other company. His guy gets an ADC membership, starts communicating with the QT team, and voila! Pixar requests... of course it sure helps a lot that it's Pixar, not Core pictures, or Blue Sky, but that's using your network...

theosmekhanes
06-26-2003, 04:39 PM
Pixlet_Rocks!!!

Yeah Beam, the only problem with microcosm was the playback speed.

It's worth the price of Panther alone.

This means that a standard 120 min movie @2k that take over 5 terabytes to store will now be less than 1 terabyte.

This is a HUGE deal !!!

Beamtracer
06-26-2003, 07:03 PM
And remember you can say goodbye to those old 8bpc image formats (like standard tif, targa, or the Animation QT codec) and up things to 16bpc without getting huge file sizes.

The real-time playback of Pixlet movies is very significant.

There's a company called Medéa that specializes in making boxes that contain arrays of RAIDed hard drives. Up until now solutions like this were necessary to play back lossless video at full size without stuttery playback. It was a great expense for anyone dealing with full quality animations or video. The Pixlet codec eliminates that expense.

I'm not sure if I'd want to own shares in the Medéa company right now.

Beamtracer
06-26-2003, 07:19 PM
It's interesting to watch the ascendancy of Apple in the video world. They are decimating their competition with products like Final Cut Pro.

Competing video applications are running for cover. Media 100 just about wiped out since the introduction of FCP. Avid is struggling and making losses selling US$100,000+ systems to broadcasters. Adobe has stepped out of the ring and withdrawn Premiere from the Mac platform.

Even Newtek must have one eye on the Apple juggernaut, even though they are competing (with Toaster) on a different platform.

Some competitors may be forced to look for niche markets, though that may be no place to hide. Avid (owners of Softimage) is using the profits of its audio division (Digidesign/Protools) to subsidize the rest and keep itself afloat.

The Pixlet codec will add to Apple's dominance, as they'll be able to offer "uncompressed quality" (lossless) with Final Cut Pro, without hardware add-ons. None of the others can match it.

archiea
06-27-2003, 05:33 PM
Still, there is alot lacking in QT for production.....

QT is designed for streaming off the net, not evaluating renders. its lacks the ability to swap between color spaces, apply log-luts, apply realtime color correction (ironic considering Apple has FCP), do speed changes, comparison buffers with wipes, pixel inspectors, etc... When I heard that QTpro was comming out a few years back, I thought thats what they meant. Instead it only enabled you to save and cut and paste. great for consolidating porn downloads, but thats it.

While pixlet as a codec is a milestone, its QT that the bottleneck here.

Consider the cinema playback product from Iridas.com. The framecycler is inexpensive and play back from RAM. With the 8gb ability of the mac, that like a match made in heaven. Too bad no OS-X support.

Aside from it being an 8bit format, these are the specs that apple should air for a REAL Quicktime pro.. (from web page
http://ddsweb.iridas.com/intro/Playback)
Playback

Sophisticated playback controls allow the user to set in and out points, slowdown or speed up playback in 1fps increments, reverse playback, zoom, crop, mirror and resample on the fly. It is also easy to check for artifacts or defects in sequences using special analysis tools including a color picker and unique color modes.

The user interface with waveform display and a powerful sequence browser as well as the Windows user interface can be completely hidden by the click of a button - to hide all distracting elements for "director's mode" viewing sessions.

toby
06-27-2003, 06:15 PM
If you have the Pixelet codec in QT that generally means that you can use it in AE, FCP, Premiere, LW, since QT is integrated in the system - that and the fact that it's a good viewer is, I think, all they want it to do. I don't think there's any point to trying to make it competitive with fcp, or even fce

Beamtracer
06-27-2003, 07:24 PM
Arthur, some corrections from your post...

"QT is designed for streaming off the net"

Quicktime was designed long before streaming ever happened.

"its lacks the ability to swap between color spaces"

You can have RGB or Y-UV. If you're referring to 10-bit Cineon, the standard for production is fast becomming 16-bit RGB, which can be translated to 10-bit Cineon or 10-bit Y-UV.

"its lacks the ability to.. ..apply realtime color correction

Final Cut Pro does real time color correction with Quicktime.

"its lacks the ability to.. ..do speed changes"

Any compositing app can change the framerate of a Quicktime.

"Aside from it being an 8bit format..."

Quicktime supports 16 bit-per-channel movies. Some apps (like After Effects) support 16bpc Quicktime. There's currently no 32bpc Quicktime format. Final Cut Pro 4 now supports 32bpc (HDRI), but I think it must use a LogLuv image sequence to do this.

Arthur, I'm not sure whether you were referring to Quicktime in general, or the QT pro application. If you were referring to QT pro, you couldn't expect real time color correction in a package that costs US$29.95.

The Iridas system you mention is probably very useful to preview feature film content, however it requires either a RAM cache, or a RAID array of fast hard drives all pulling together.

The significance of the Pixlet codec is that it plays lossless "D1" spec video off any standard ATA hard drive. No RAM cache, no RAID. It also supports 16bpc RGB plus alpha.

archiea
06-27-2003, 08:51 PM
Actually, there are no corrections, Beam...

I said QT "is" designed for streaming, not that it was originally designed for it. Currently, as it stands, QT is mainly for streaming and a standard for a sequence of frames or animation codec. its no flipbook in the tradition of flipbooks in the film industry.

10 bit cienons are logarithmic, while 16 bit are typcially linear or monitor space. A log curve can keep float values intact as they never quite reach 1 or zero. Also, I'm talking about converting between colorspaces too....

FCP may do realtime color correction, but I'm taling about QT. If youa re showing an HD pixlet movie in QT and they ask you how it would look darker and more magenta, you'd have to load up FCP. I'm talking having FCP's color corrector embedded withing QT, do changes on the fly with a client, then save the color correction in the FCP format and/or Shake color corrector for later inclusion with the shot. This is how the flipbooks in many studio's work.

As far as frame rate, you mention compositing aps. I'm talking about a client saying they want to see the animation at 1.5 speed. Try doing that on the fly in AT. I many flipbook software you can....

As far as the 8 bit format, I was refering to the Playback software, not QT

And if you want to talk color depth and precision, thee's no reason to not use cineons (or ILM's new format) to REALLY preserve your color info in log space. You could then aplly color correction on the fly and never truncate your data.

And, again, I was commenting on QT as an playback software, not the pixlet codec. I think that the concept of pixlet is great. Its just that QT Pro ain't not flipbook software.... And I'd gladly pay $200 for a REAL QT pro with the features that I requested

fxgeek
06-29-2003, 10:45 AM
Originally posted by archiea
Actually, there are no corrections, Beam...

I said QT "is" designed for streaming, not that it was originally designed for it. Currently, as it stands, QT is mainly for streaming and a standard for a sequence of frames or animation codec. its no flipbook in the tradition of flipbooks in the film industry.

10 bit cienons are logarithmic, while 16 bit are typcially linear or monitor space. A log curve can keep float values intact as they never quite reach 1 or zero. Also, I'm talking about converting between colorspaces too....

FCP may do realtime color correction, but I'm taling about QT. If youa re showing an HD pixlet movie in QT and they ask you how it would look darker and more magenta, you'd have to load up FCP. I'm talking having FCP's color corrector embedded withing QT, do changes on the fly with a client, then save the color correction in the FCP format and/or Shake color corrector for later inclusion with the shot. This is how the flipbooks in many studio's work.

As far as frame rate, you mention compositing aps. I'm talking about a client saying they want to see the animation at 1.5 speed. Try doing that on the fly in AT. I many flipbook software you can....

As far as the 8 bit format, I was refering to the Playback software, not QT

And if you want to talk color depth and precision, thee's no reason to not use cineons (or ILM's new format) to REALLY preserve your color info in log space. You could then aplly color correction on the fly and never truncate your data.

And, again, I was commenting on QT as an playback software, not the pixlet codec. I think that the concept of pixlet is great. Its just that QT Pro ain't not flipbook software.... And I'd gladly pay $200 for a REAL QT pro with the features that I requested

I think you are getting confused with the quicktime player and quicktime itself. Not many people realise the full potential of quicktime or even fully what it is, and I have no intention of going into that here. (Go and read some of Apple's developer documentation on Quicktime to get a better understanding of what Quicktime is - and it's primary purpose is far from being a streaming format) The flipbook players that you refger to commonly work by loading data into ram. It's a shame Newtek didn't include such software with Lightwave, but both Shake and Maya come with powerfull flipbook software the likes of what you want. I suggest that Final Cut Pro or Even express would suit your needs.

Jay Kelley
07-16-2003, 01:47 PM
You Mac people sure like to argue a lot. You guys must be a real hoot at parties.

As for me. I like Windows-Based machines. I used FCP for 4 months a while ago (On a friend's system) just saw Premiere Pro's new interface and color correction tools....


Oh, my god. I can hardly wait until August.

Quicktime is ok. We'll see.


Jay

Beamtracer
07-16-2003, 03:57 PM
Originally posted by Jay Kelley
As for me. I like Windows-Based machines. Fair enough. Sadly though, I think that Windows users are going to once again miss out when it comes to the Pixlet codec.

If I were Apple, I'd make authoring and playback of the Pixlet codec possible on the Mac, and make only playback possible on Windows. It remains to be seen what Apple will do here.

I think the Pixlet codec will be quite revolutionary... not just another codec on the list. I keep wondering if one of the video card manufacturers will support it.

Then again, maybe it will eventually make such cards obsolete. Apple claims that you can play lossless Pixlet movies from the desktop of any new Mac with the Panther OS installed. No video card needed.

In a professional environment you must have perfect and flawless playback off your hard drive. I don't know if Pixlet has achieved this yet.

Video people still use "BNC video cables" and "SDI video cables" to link machines, so they'll still use video capture cards for a while. It won't be long before all this disappears.

One day professional video will be done on "office equipment" (standard hard drives) without the need for video hardware, dramatically lowering costs.

Newtek take note (with your Toaster): Eventually, video cables themselves will all disappear. Video is just data. Eventually it'll all be transferred over IP links, including editing and playback. Have a think about it.

theosmekhanes
07-16-2003, 04:23 PM
The Toaster is already Doomed. It's just that some folks around here don't get out of their caves enough to realize it.

Beamtracer
07-16-2003, 04:48 PM
I wasn't going to go that far!

I wouldn't say it's doomed. They've just got a mighty challenge to compete with larger players. They need to either think ahead of the others (and try to capture new trends before anyone else) or they'll be forced into niche markets.

js33
07-16-2003, 06:42 PM
Like the Mac:D
Oh no that will never happen to Newtek.:D

Beam I think the Pixlet codec looks interesting. But I think you are putting far too much importance into it.

I've been able to capture and playback broadcast quality video for over 5 years with a PVR that only requires 1 SCSI harddrive that runs off the PVR's built-in scsi controller. The only video that doesn't require SCSI drives is DV which is only 3.6 MB per sec.

Broadcast video is still at least twice that. About 7MB/sec (50Mbit/sec) and goes up from there.

I think Pixlet is just a new variant of Mpeg4 or Mpeg2. Both of which are highly compressed and Mpeg 2 at top bitrate is 10 mbit/sec which is about 1.2 MB/sec so it is playable by regular computers with ATA harddrives. Try playing a 7MB/sec stream on even the fastest Serial ATA and it will choke.

It will still be awhile before a non hardware assisted Mac/PC will be able to play or edit REAL broadcast quality video/graphics.

As for the toaster it was designed to take advantage of the increasing performance of computers so why would it become obsolete?

Cheers,
JS

Ade
07-16-2003, 07:59 PM
Pixlet has been in developmen for 4 years with help from Pixar and ILM, it is a big codec, I wouldnt be suprised if u get charged for it.


Toaster....Isnt that a CD burning app?.... (joke)

Beamtracer
07-16-2003, 08:38 PM
Originally posted by js33
The only video that doesn't require SCSI drives is DV which is only 3.6 MB per sec.

Broadcast video is still at least twice that. About 7MB/sec (50Mbit/sec) and goes up from there. Have another look, js.
Pixlet is lossless.
It's 16 bits-per-channel
and it's data footprint is about the same size as DV.
That's what's so amazing.

That means you can play it off a standard hard drive. No need for special SCSI drives. Nobody else has done this before with a lossless codec. There is nothing similar on the Windows platform (Bon Voyage, Adobe!)

The other MPEG variants are fine for web streaming but they are lossy codecs, making them no good for professional post production. With Pixlet there is no loss of any pixels or image clarity.

The Pixlet codec comes free to anyone who purchases the Panther OS (OSX 10.3)

js33
07-16-2003, 09:26 PM
Yeah I'll have to look at but it sounds a little fishy. (No pun intended).:D

I don't see how anything can be lossless and small at the same time. Those two just don't go together on this planet.

If this was real technology then how come nobody has HDTV yet and digital video cameras compress the crap out of video?

Cheers,
JS

Beamtracer
07-16-2003, 10:31 PM
Ah, js, you're starting to come around and agree that this is something significant, rather than someone's "exaggerated" mind.

When you find out that it's true, will you go out and buy yourself a new G5? :)

This is the new generation of codecs. It uses wavelet technology (like MP4 and JPEG-2000) to achieve these amazing results, except that Pixlet really is lossless.

js33
07-16-2003, 10:38 PM
Originally posted by Beamtracer
Ah, js, you're starting to come around and agree that this is something significant, rather than someone's "exaggerated" mind.


I never said it wasn't significant. I just don't see how it can be high quality and lossless at the same time being a small file.



When you find out that it's true, will you go out and buy yourself a new G5? :)

I'm withholding that decision also until I can see one in person and get real benchmarks. Lightwave performance in particular.



This is the new generation of codecs. It uses wavelet technology (like MP4 and JPEG-2000) to achieve these amazing results, except that Pixlet really is lossless.

OK but MP4 and Jpeg2000 are both lossy. So how can something based on the same technology be lossless? That's the part that doesn't make sense.

Cheers,
JS

bsales
07-16-2003, 11:30 PM
I think Apple claims Pixlet is "Studio-Grade." I have not heard them say it is lossless.

Anyone know different?

js33
07-16-2003, 11:39 PM
Also why did it take Apple so long to get into video?
I guess they finally saw the writing on the wall regarding DTP which was their "Killer App" for soooo loonngggg.

The Amiga did video in 1985.
Then the PC started about 1993.

Cheers,
JS

fxgeek
07-17-2003, 08:39 AM
Pixlet is not loseless. There are no visible artifacts, which is the difference.

As for Apple taking a long time to get into video, I think you need to check your history. The desktop video revolution started on the Mac. Avid's first platform was the Mac. Much of what is now taken for granted in digital video was started by quicktime.

Ade
07-17-2003, 09:04 AM
Originally posted by js33
Also why did it take Apple so long to get into video?
I guess they finally saw the writing on the wall regarding DTP which was their "Killer App" for soooo loonngggg.

The Amiga did video in 1985.
Then the PC started about 1993.

Cheers,
JS

Macs have been doing video longer than pc, AVID started on macs, and so did Premiere.

Red_Oddity
07-17-2003, 09:47 AM
Who friggin' cares where what software started...if i where Apple ,i made sure my codec would work on all platforms (like ILM's codec)...
Why not? Most studios use such a large crossbreed of platforms (and for good reasons) that it would be a bit of useless codec when it would be Mac only...

(Just check other video companies, most codec or transcoders are crossplatform or available for more platforms just than the one the original hard/software runs on...Avid/Media100/VooDoo/ect)

Ade
07-17-2003, 09:56 AM
Macs also had Cd drives before pc's like 1 year before...This info surely will get me a girl...

Red_Oddity
07-17-2003, 10:00 AM
It sure will...heck..i just have to talk 'software' and they're on me like flies...

Imagine what that bit of hardware info will get you...Kylie Minogue, painted green, vacume packed with a copy of the racing times sticking between her bumm...That's what bud...

Jimzip
07-17-2003, 10:12 AM
Hey there quarelling Lightwavers!
Archiea, about what was said on the first page of this thread, Quicktime can do basic editing of your videos in realtime. Press CMD-K if you have QT pro, and up comes a small image editor. You can change brightness contrast, tint, and colour.
I do agree with you about the fps changes, that should have been a feature from version 1.0... However, I guess you can hold down the ff or rw buttons..
What really gets me about using PC's at uni is Windows media player. I get frustrated with the fact that I can't scrub through the movie.. I end up using quicktime on all the school computers..

Codecs. Ah, yes codecs. Pixlet (done some research) does indeed look like an amazing advance in the video compression field. I'm drooling for it personally. But still, I really think that MPEG-4 is not being used enough. I thought it would really kick off with a bang. Not twenty minutes before writing this, I compressed a QT animation into MPEG-4.. The file was 74MB, now it is 746kb. I think that's pretty damn good. (Artefacts are only just visible by the way). Let's all use MPEG-4 for now and shout 'hooray!'.

Jimzip :D
Go now in peace Wavin' bretheren.:)

js33
07-17-2003, 12:08 PM
Originally posted by fxgeek
Pixlet is not loseless. There are no visible artifacts, which is the difference.

As for Apple taking a long time to get into video, I think you need to check your history. The desktop video revolution started on the Mac. Avid's first platform was the Mac. Much of what is now taken for granted in digital video was started by quicktime.

OK I looked at Avids website and they started the same time
Newtek came out with the Video Toaster.
But Avids have never been affordable to anyone but big studios.

Cheers,
JS

Beamtracer
07-17-2003, 04:27 PM
Avids were once the great ones in non-linear video. Sure, they were only affordable by studios, but back then non-linear video editing was not something for the masses. It's Apple that changed that.

There are still a lot of Avid systems being used, and still more big studios doing big productions on Avid rather than Final Cut Pro. However, the numbers are changing rapidly. FCP is literally eating away Avid's market. Studios are switching everywhere.

Pixlet is lossless

Sorry to shout, but it doesn't seem to be sinking in. The three revolutionary things about Pixlet are:
-Lossless
-16 bits-per-channel (64-bit RGBA)
-Smooth playback without additional hardware
There is nothing on the Windows platform that combines any two of these three factors.

This is not something for the average home user. This is a tool for the film and television industry who now demand lossless image formats. It would fit in well with ILM's new 'EXR' image format. You render 3D to an EXR image sequence. You store it, edit it, play it back in Pixlet.

It has the potential to completely change the way everyone works. Once again, the company leading the way with video technology is Apple. I predict that Apple will win an Emmy award for Pixlet.


A description of Wavelets from Science magazine:
"Wavelets used to be merely curios of the mathematical realm, visually boring wiggles .... But their ability to represent shapes and patterns compactly -- from storing fingerprint data on suspected terrorists to preparing targets for a missile strike against enemy forces -- has suddenly made them very popular in some pretty important places."

toby
07-17-2003, 04:52 PM
it would help if you could give link to where it says 'lossless' - I can't find it

you must admit it's almost too good to be true

Lin
08-18-2003, 02:52 AM
I just wanted to chime in and say that FrameCycler will be available for Mac OS X by the end of the year.

If you are interested in signing onto the beta program, please send an email to [email protected]

Thanks,
Lin

CEO, IRIDAS

toby
08-18-2003, 03:06 AM
that's pretty cool! - and cheap too
thank you

archiea
08-18-2003, 03:10 AM
thats great, thanks Lin...

I remember when Quicktime Pro came out, I thought it was going to be a professional playback device. All its for is streaming.

Pixlet sounds like a good compromise, but I'll stick to cineons for now....

Lin
08-18-2003, 03:16 AM
And another thing - from what I heard at the Jobs keynote, Pixlet seems to compress that high only for CG-style movies, like the ones Pixar creates.

What really is interesting is how it holds up with film sequences. Scanned film is very hard to compress because it contains a lot of grain. So essentially every pixel changes all of the time. This is probably one of the reasons nobody ever bothered with compression in Cineons.

It is definitely an interesting development though and we will of course support it (we do have Quicktime, AVI, MPEG... support in FrameCycler).

As a side note: If your ATA drive can sustain about 35 MB/s, which many of the newer ones can, you can stream D1 frame sequences directly from disk using FrameCycler - no need to use a Codec or any conversion at all.

Cheers,
Lin

fxgeek
08-18-2003, 03:23 AM
Hi Lin

This really is great news and thanks to you and the whole engineering team over there. Quick question. will frame cycler support the video out quicktime function with pro broadcast boards like those from digital voodoo and the AJA kona ?

Lin
08-18-2003, 03:33 AM
We do have plans to support the hardware API of Quicktime later this year, yes.

Cheers,
Lin

archiea
08-18-2003, 03:46 AM
Lin,

With the new 8GB limit on the new Apples, its seems like one can play out even long scenes at 2K from this box. is that a safe assumption?

One interesting aspect of Cinesite's playback was how you could do realtime color correcting on the playback system, jot down the values, and give them to the compositor to put in the script.

Any chance of creating a means where the player can save out corrections as a FCP file or as a shake script (using the add, mult, gamma and/or a lookup node). This would be invaluable. I think the Lookup node would be the best all around.

Thanks again!

Lin
08-18-2003, 03:54 AM
Yes, the extended address space is why we look at the G5 and also the Itanium and Opteron systems.

If you have a fast RAID array you can already use FrameCycler DDS to play any length direct-from-disk.

But for RAM based review off the network on every workstation, the 2GB (3GB on XP) limit of Win32/LINUX/MacOS is pretty cumbersome, because it usually means a shot doesn't completely fit.

We are also looking into more options on how to accelerate disk based review on "regular" machines.

About the color correction... Actually that is exactly how ESC Entertainment is using our SpeedGrade system (http://www.escfx.com - http://www.speedgrade.com). Do realtime color correction, then feed this into Shake.

Of course you can output directly from SpeedGrade as well.

We are looking into FCP support when we start the Mac beta. We are already using XML for data exchange, so it shouldn't be that difficult.

Cheers,
Lin

harlan
08-18-2003, 02:59 PM
That's terrific news Lin, I'm glad to see you guys are going to start supporting OSX. In the past, the only that prevented me from purchasing your tools was the lack of OSX support. While we're a mixed OS house, most of our stuff is Mac based.

Also, just for those who aren't familiar. The G5 isn't "limited" to a max of 8GB, due to the current size of DIMM's, the max you can fit into a G5 system is 8GB, but I believe the G5 itself is capable of addressing up to 18 Exabytes of RAM - we just have to wait til the DIMM's get bigger. ;)