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Derek Nicholas
07-05-2007, 06:51 PM
:question:

...or any inexpensive version with which to get my feet wet?

Thanks again.

-Derek Nicholas

kmacphail
07-05-2007, 08:45 PM
Hi Derek,

Since you're asking specifically for Unix, check out FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, or even Mac OSX as it is built on Darwin which is itself a BSD Unix.

If you're going to try Linux I'd suggest OpenSUSE, Fedora or a flavor of Unbuntu.

-Kevin

Alliante
07-05-2007, 08:50 PM
Linux is a very popular "UNIX Compatible" operating system. When others ask for my advice or if I'd install a system so that they can 'experiment with' I suggest Ubuntu.

If you're not really wanting to to worry about hardware compatibility, MacOS X (any version!) is the way to go. Most new "UNIX Developers" target Linux and anything else is a bonus. Honestly any POSIX complaint program should be able to compile on any modern OS these days.

Phil
07-06-2007, 03:19 AM
Hi Derek,

Since you're asking specifically for Unix, check out FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, or even Mac OSX as it is built on Darwin which is itself a BSD Unix.

If you're going to try Linux I'd suggest OpenSUSE, Fedora or a flavor of Unbuntu.

-Kevin

That would be Ubuntu :P

In general, depending on your wants/needs, I would seriously recommend a boxed version of SUSE. Not for the distribution so much, although it used to be one of my favourites until OS X sucked me in, but because of the documentation. The boxed version has printed, proper manuals (*shock*). These are reproduced electronically, but that is not always ideal.

Where SUSE is a problem is that it tends to not always obey the standard Linux conventions in terms of command locations and filesystem layout (packages installed in /opt/ where others have them in /usr/).

For true UNIX, though, I have no idea what to suggest. BSD is very different to Linux. Solaris is also available for download from Sun. Parallels or VMWare would be your friend here for quick and easy evaluation.

mattclary
07-06-2007, 08:40 AM
Not sure why y'all are recommending OS X, as I would guess he probably isn't looking to buy new hardware just to run the OS. He said INEXPENSIVE, OS X comes with a ~$2000 dongle. Also, even though I know OS X is Unix based, is it "really" the same thing? My understanding is that OS X is not something you can readily go in and tweak...

I also will recommend Ubuntu. Not Unix, but I have a feeling you may really want Linux, even if you haven't figured that out yet. ;)

I have tried various distros; OpenSuse, Freespire, Mandriva, etc... and I found Ubuntu to be the best combination of simple yet not being so polished that you can't scratch the surface. Does that make sense? Ubuntu just seems more basic and accessible than the others to me.

If you just want to "use it", Linux is great, I have a customer (I do computer repair on the side) who I moved to Linux because Windows was hosed and she had no OS disks. She just needs web access, e-mail, and some basic word processing needs. She hasn't had any problems at all. In my yellow pages ad that comes out in December, I am actually plugging Linux as an alternative for people who are tired of viruses.

kmacphail
07-06-2007, 09:12 AM
That would be Ubuntu :P

You need to spend less time spell checking and more time writing a tutorial for LWSN on LINUX.:)


Not sure why y'all are recommending OS X
Oh I'm not recommending it, I don't even like it that much, but I've found that a lot of people who use OSX don't know they can pop open the terminal and work with bash. For all I know he wrote his post from a Mac, and in that case it would be free.

Cheers,

-Kevin

Phil
07-06-2007, 09:39 AM
Bah. I should. I will. You've shamed me into it and I will see what I can do tonight. *raspberry*

Phil
07-06-2007, 11:24 AM
http://www.newtek.com/forums/showpost.php?p=565159&postcount=8

I've probably missed something in writing it up, but LWSN on Linux is working here and has been for some time.

lots
07-06-2007, 01:11 PM
My vote always goes to Gentoo.. Its just so nice.. Easy to use if you're not afraid of typing.. :P

Any particular reason you need a Unix system? You're more likely going to find more free software available to you on Linux, as there is a larger development community backing it, at least in open source.

Alliante
07-06-2007, 02:57 PM
Any particular reason you need a Unix system? You're more likely going to find more free software available to you on Linux, as there is a larger development community backing it, at least in open source.

Except Lightwave Photoshop, Premiere and After Effects

....and don't tell me that the GIMP is a Photoshop replacement, it's not. There are quite a few workflow issues in it.

When Adobe releases a Linux version of their suites, that'll be the day we know MS is in trouble on the desktop.

Phil
07-06-2007, 04:41 PM
Well, if you don't need completely recent versions of Adobe's works, then Wine will do the job. I have run Photoshop 7 and Illustrator 10 under it before now. After Effects is not something I am familiar with, but wouldn't expect it to work.

lots
07-07-2007, 12:09 PM
Except Lightwave Photoshop, Premiere and After Effects

....and don't tell me that the GIMP is a Photoshop replacement, it's not. There are quite a few workflow issues in it.

When Adobe releases a Linux version of their suites, that'll be the day we know MS is in trouble on the desktop.
This would be a valid argument, if a Unix based system provided compatability with these softwares too ;) But it doesn't..

You are right, GIMP is no replacement for PS. It is rather different in interface, and does not offer as much up front, but it offers some familiar functionality, and thats a step. Similarly there are editors and compositors that offer some functionality like AE and Premiere, granted not at the same level, but its at least somethign. And then there's Blender, which is a fairly well off app that is a good alternative (if you have no money, and the time to get used to its wacky interface) to LW.

Anyway my quote in your post was referring to the OS in general, not specifically 3D. The OP asked for an inexpencive or free UNIX based OS. Outside of 3D and games, you can do fairly well with the free software available. I was just pointing out that Linux had a wider software base than BSD Unix does.

Alliante
07-07-2007, 05:44 PM
Oh yeah, completely agree, Linux has made leaps and strides in drivers and driver interface api's in the last 2 years. Consolidated the interfaces for serial ata, ide & scsi into one /dev section. And X.org's coming along nicely too. The next few years will be very exciting... especially since Vista has left a bad taste in quite a few people's mouths (though I'm not particularly super-unhappy with it, as it has a few improvments over XP).

KDE4 will have a lot to do with the adaptation of Linux over the next few years too.

Para
07-08-2007, 05:38 AM
If you're going to try Linux I'd suggest OpenSUSE...

Please don't, that distro causes nightmares to me even while I'm awake.

eagleeyed
07-09-2007, 04:09 AM
Ok, I am currently a faithful Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn User. I originally tryed it cos I was bored. Best decision I ever made. I will admit, most systems everything will work out the box, it was not the case for me and I had to spend a few days trying to get my Surround Sound working, My DVD drive playing DVD's and my HD TV Capture Card working.

However now my computer has not crashed once in Ubuntu, I went to Windows for the first time in about 2 weeks to use LightWave on it, within 5 minutes my computer was restarting by itself.

For the first time my sound card does not pop, the sound levels are perfect etc. I spent days in Windows tuning the sound but never got the result I got from Ubuntu, it is brilliant.

I did not know my TV card was capable of capturing Surround Sound from TV, I got such a surpise when I turned over to Channel 7's (Australian) HD sample station and the middle speaker was working.

The last thing is that I dont have a problem with the graphics card. In Windows I would have to restart the driver to watch a DVD while the DVD was running, to change TV channels I would have to turn off the TV program, open it up then change the channel for the video feed to be normal colour, and that was if it had not restarted automatically.

The one thing that Windows does work better at for me though is Dual Screen, I cant in Linux due to Video quality being choppy when Dual Screen is enabled.

Anyway, that is my experience with Windows and Ubuntu.

Alliante
07-09-2007, 07:29 AM
The one thing that Windows does work better at for me though is Dual Screen, I cant in Linux due to Video quality being choppy when Dual Screen is enabled.
x.org 7.3 looks like it will help out a lot of your display issues :)

http://www.arsgeek.com/?p=2034

eagleeyed
07-09-2007, 09:57 AM
Thanks for the link, I am really looking forward to that, all I need now is Sony Vegas and Lightwave (I cant see this happening in the near future) to work in Linux then I can say goodbye to Windows for good.