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Ty Catt
07-03-2007, 01:13 PM
Hey y'all,

I have to print a rendered frame for a client. It's to be mounted at around 36"X48". I have the camera aspect ratio sized properly and ready to go. The final render when put into Photoshop is at 72 dpi. What's the minimum dpi for my large print size? Anything too high (even 200dpi) puts the image file size into more than 100 MB which will annoy lots of people.

Any suggestions, ideas?:help:
Thanks,

Ty

Surrealist.
07-03-2007, 02:47 PM
Render the largest image LightWave will let you with available RAM. Chances are that will top out at around 4,000 pixels by 4,000 pixels - modified of course by your aspect ratio.

Try to get at least 1/3 the size of the final image at 300. ppi (use a calulator or print assistant) so that you can take it into Photoshop, enable Bicubic resampling and set the resolution to 300, pixels/inch. Then enter your final size into the dimension fields. This will resample the image and allow you to have it be good and sharp for printing.

This will give you a file that when the printer loads up will be exactly the size you need printed at the printer's 300 dpi - standard for most printers.

Don't let them talk you into a file size at 150 dpi and that "they can just upres it using the printer software". Don't buy it. And don't worry about the file size. My prints for that size are in the 300 to 400 megabite range.

Some printers do balk at these file sizes because they have to wait for it to load and then they also might have the incorrect information that the printer can't handle it. That is simply not true. These oversize printers are designed for serious graphics professionals. And that means large files. And don't give it to them in PDF either. Use Tiff. I always get the best results this way.

I had to experiment quite a bit to get this right with many different printers in many states, so I wish you the best of luck with it.

Ty Catt
07-05-2007, 08:48 AM
Richard,

Thanks for the response!

I just need to clarify what you mean by using the calculator or print assistant to get the 1/3 size. I am alrady rendering the frame so when I bring it into Photoshop, I can turn off Bicubic, and when I enter 300 dpi, it reduces it to the right inches size. Is that an unnecessary step (what your 1/3 step meant to avoid)?

I appreciate your insight and will give it a try!

Thanks, again!

Ty

BeeVee
07-05-2007, 08:53 AM
All you need to do is type the sums in the Camera Properties window, so to get an X value of 36" at 300 DPI you type 36*300 to get 10800 and likewise to get 48" high all you need to type is 48*300 to get 14400, but I really doubt you are doing to be able to render at that?

B

Ty Catt
07-05-2007, 09:25 AM
BeeVee,

Isn't there a maximum limit to LW render capabilities?

4000 x 4000, isn't it?

Ty

BeeVee
07-05-2007, 09:31 AM
In theory it is 16,000x16,000, however this is only really achievable on a 64-bit machine with lots of memory for anything other than the very simplest of scenes.

B

Surrealist.
07-05-2007, 01:33 PM
Thanks Ben!

:)

So easy to forget to mention the built in calculator!

That's brilliant as usual.



Richard,

Thanks for the response!

I just need to clarify what you mean by using the calculator or print assistant to get the 1/3 size. I am alrady rendering the frame so when I bring it into Photoshop, I can turn off Bicubic, and when I enter 300 dpi, it reduces it to the right inches size. Is that an unnecessary step (what your 1/3 step meant to avoid)?

I appreciate your insight and will give it a try!

Thanks, again!

Ty

Your end result needs to be the resolution of 10800 by 14400. (at 300 ppi that's 36 by 48 inches)

What I meant was you won't be able to render that many pixels - not because of LightWave's restrictions but because of needed resources - as Ben pointed out.

From my experience I can get away with upresing about 300 to 400 percent in Photoshop and still get crisp oversize prints.

Bicubic resampling does a nice job of doing this.

So if your image needs to be that big you need to get as much out of LightWave as you can - on your machine. Make sure you have the exact aspect ratio in pixels.

Then take that, load it into Photoshop. Using Image size, Check Resample Image/Bicubic.

Enter 300 into the resolution field and then your print size in inches in the document size. The reason I do it this way is because I can dial in any number of pixels exactly to the print size. You do use percentages if you want but I always want to see thee image size.

This will resample the image at 300 ppi for printing at 300 dpi - the standard for almost all printers (machines) these days.

For the reasons I listed above this will give you the best results because Photoshop does a much better job at resampling than the printer software.