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View Full Version : Buying Advice: Case fans / 10,000rpm drives



Matt
06-11-2007, 05:04 AM
Hi guys!

As always you opinions mean a lot to me!

I'm looking to add a few bits to my PC, first one is 120mm case fans, in your experience which have the most efficient CFM/noise ratio?

I'm not after total silence, I don't mind a dull hum of a fan, but nothing that rattles! More important is how much air it can shift.

I've been looking at these fellas (if I can find somewhere with them in stock!)

Silenx Ixtrema Pro 18dBA / 90CFM fan (120x120x38mm)
http://www.silenx.com/ixtremaprofans.asp

But any advice would be appreciated.

Also, looking to replace my boot drive with a 10,000rpm drive, to speed up loading times and general performance with page filing.

Was looking at this one:

150 Gb Western Digital WD1500ADFD Raptor Enterprise, SATA150, 10000 rpm, 16MB Cache, 4.6 ms, NCQ:
http://www.scan.co.uk/Products/ProductInfo.asp?WebProductID=325630

But are 10,000rpm drives really worth the money? Or is it just as beneficial to buy a few 72,000rpm drives and RAID 0 them?

Appreciated as always!

Matt

mattclary
06-11-2007, 05:41 AM
Matt, I would go to Newegg.com, find the fan type you are looking for, then read some user reviews. The technology behind fans is pretty mature and I don't think you will find a huge difference unless you try to find the absolute cheapest you can.

As to the 10,000 RPM hard drives: Personally, I think it's a waste of money that could better be put to another use (like beer), but to each his own.

FYI, I have the Gigabyte 3D Aurora case and am really happy with it. I think it has 2 120mm fans in the back and one in the front. In addition, my power supply has a 120mm in it. Everything stays nice and cool and is very close to silent. I also have Zalman heatsinks on my CPU and video card. I have found those two items are usually where the bulk of the noise comes from.

mattclary
06-11-2007, 06:03 AM
Having programs load faster isn't that big a deal to me, I don't notice a delay as is. A faster CPU speeds up rendering, a fast hard drive does not (unless of course you are low on memory, in which case the money should be spent in that area).

I think it's a waste of money, but, as I said, to each his own.

Matt
06-11-2007, 06:10 AM
Thanks Neverko, useful.

Matt, I hear ya, but for me, boot times, loading times and general page file activity could all do with a kick up the pants!

As Neverko said, it's the one bottle neck in my system at the moment.

Neverko, how easy it is to setup RAID 0 from boot, to then install Windows on? I remember it asking if you wanted to install a thrid party RAID driver, but clearly I have no idea what happens past that!

Cheers
Matt

Matt
06-11-2007, 07:18 AM
What about USB stick? Does it work for that? Having said that, floppy disks cost nothing these days.

Jarno
06-11-2007, 07:36 AM
http://www.silentpcreview.com/section12.html for lots of silent fan stuff.

Jim_C
06-11-2007, 07:48 AM
This is the ugly part... unfortunately.


Another idea ,one I used at a time because of the mentioned ugliness (and lack of a floppy drive), is to hook up an extra drive you have laying around, old ide works great. You dont even have to mount it just get it plugged in.

Install windows on it. Then install your raid and use windows drive management to stripe it, which is REAL easy.

Then use free xxclone (http://www.xxclone.com/) to copy your windows install from your ide to your stripe, reboot and remove the ide drive.

Worked perfectly for me and machine has been running for close to a year with no problems.

Kinda awkward I know, but it worked.

Jim

mattclary
06-11-2007, 09:35 AM
What about USB stick? Does it work for that? Having said that, floppy disks cost nothing these days.

If installing XP that is already at SP2 level "MAY" recognize a USB stick, not sure. A lot of drivers nowadays won't fit on a floppy. This problem with drivers at install time is the most compelling reason I have heard to move to Vista yet.

nolan
06-11-2007, 09:48 AM
Matt . . . You might want to check for BIOS update features. I normally leave well enough alone when it comes to this but the latest BIOS update implemented an "on-board" raid 0, 1, 0+1 and 5 ability that wasn't available with the earlier versions. No requiring external drivers.:D

Nolan

Matt
06-11-2007, 12:15 PM
Actually, you're right Nolan, I do remember seeing that option in my BIOS, just had a look, and it is there, so maybe it's easier than first expected.

So I guess I would install the drives, Flash my BIOS, set it to RAID mode, then install Windows right?

nolan
06-11-2007, 12:46 PM
Actually, you're right Nolan, I do remember seeing that option in my BIOS, just had a look, and it is there, so maybe it's easier than first expected.

So I guess I would install the drives, Flash my BIOS, set it to RAID mode, then install Windows right?

For me the sequence was to:
1- flash the BIOS
2- Install the OS
3- Select the drives that I wanted to be in the raid config
4- Let the BIOS/OS handle formatting and data transfer

Now when I boot-up I get my boot menu( XP32 & XP64 installed) then the raid menu (only used if you add any additional drives or change allocated drives). The raid array (mine is 5 sata 320 gig's) so up as a single drive. If you can do it, raid 5 allows failure of any single drive without any lost data.

Nolan

evolross
10-25-2007, 03:29 PM
If you're going to go with a RAID setup, is it important to have the OS on it? For speed, I'm assuming?

I thought about setting up like a RAID 0 workspace drive, then having a seperate backup drive, and maybe an OS partition on that drive.

AbnRanger
10-25-2007, 11:01 PM
...Was looking at this one:

150 Gb Western Digital WD1500ADFD Raptor Enterprise, SATA150, 10000 rpm, 16MB Cache, 4.6 ms, NCQ:
http://www.scan.co.uk/Products/ProductInfo.asp?WebProductID=325630

But are 10,000rpm drives really worth the money? Or is it just as beneficial to buy a few 72,000rpm drives and RAID 0 them?

Appreciated as always!

MattWhat about these new 15k RPM drives?
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822116016

I'm still waiting on AMD to release the desktop version of their Quad-Core CPU's (since they have a MB with 2 sockets, for a total 8 cores)...Phenom is what I think it's called. I had the same thing in mind that you have.
Combustion quickly chews up the 3GB alloted to it, so a fast HD/RAID config is very necessary. I was even looking at the solid state HD's. Looks like they're mostly for notebooks right now, and pretty expensive.

Boris Goreta
10-26-2007, 04:02 AM
There are some nice and quiet fans at http://www.acousticpc.com/
Also they have passive coolers for xeon processors which is great since stock coolers make a lot of noise.