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cbreton49
06-07-2007, 04:24 PM
I am new to rigging and I have been following many tutorials on it so I feel I am doing pretty good. I have my man rigged and all set up, now I want to place him in a seat and my goal is to have his foot follow a pedal as in an airplane pedal that moves back and forth. I will eventaully have him grab the stick and I want his hands follow the movement of the stick as well. With IK his foot follows the pedal, but that's it. How do I make his whole leg follow his foot? Is there a way to reverse the IK so that his whole leg follows the action of the foot to the pedal? I know I will run into that when I try and do the hands as well.
I've tried goals and nulls, that work for the foot, but how do I get the whole leg to follow suit?
Thanks so much for your help in advance.
cbreton49

Dodgy
06-07-2007, 06:16 PM
It appears your foot isn't parented to your leg. If you parent the foot to the leg, and then parent the IK goal to the pedal, as you move the pedal up and down, the leg should bend to accomodate it.

voriax
06-07-2007, 06:28 PM
I'm a bit confused as to how you're using IK other than to make the whole leg move. IK is meant to do this in the first place...
It looks like you're moving the foot bone expecting the leg to follow .. which is not really how IK works, generally.

Best way to move the foot and cause the leg to move with IK, is set up a goal null object, then set the foot bone's goal as the null, and set the foot bone to "match goal orientation". You'll have to rotate the null around to bring the foot back into alignment, simply because of the weird orientations that bones take on.

Make sure in the leg bone motion controls, the pitch/heading are set to use inverse kinematics.

SplineGod
06-07-2007, 11:59 PM
I know Timothy Albee likes to have the hands and feet not parented to the arms or legs. You can parent the IK goal for the arms to the wrist bone or parent the leg goal to the ankle bone in the foot. Its got its advantages. I tend to use a more standard approach where the hands and feet are parented to the arms and legs. :)