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Pavlov
06-05-2007, 11:42 AM
hi,
in new system i've just few options for Video card since i'm buying a Dell and i cannot choose freely.
here are the two:

- 256MB nVidia GeForce 7300
- 256MB PCIe x16 NVIDIA Quadro FX 3450

i know quadros are not so much better on Lw, and this one costs about 180 more than the 7300.
Any fast advice (i need to order this machine asap) ?

thanks so much,
Paolo

amigo
06-05-2007, 11:58 AM
Isn't it obvious then, get the 7300 :)

You can then replace it if necessary with a 8xxx series (like 8600GTS for example which is fairly decent for most applications, and cheaper than full blown 8800)

StereoMike
06-05-2007, 11:58 AM
I can't say much on the Quadro, but 7300 is a bad number for a graphics board.
The first digit is the series (6,7, or the new 8) then follows a number to give a hint on the power of the card: the higher the better. There can't be much else below 7300...

mike

Pavlov
06-05-2007, 12:02 PM
rotfl, two opposite advices.. ;)
I.e, now i use a 6600 - 256MB which is not fast but not so bad either... is 7300 any faster ?
How is the 8600GTS in comparison with that quadro ?

Paolo

Sande
06-05-2007, 01:09 PM
I usually recommend against buying a Quadro, but if you have to choose between those two cards, I would pick up the Quadro.

180e isn't that much more and you should even see some performance gain with that Quadro. 7300 is quite slow, even the GT version of it, so I guess you would end up buying a new card pretty soon if you chose that one...

Pavlov
06-05-2007, 01:11 PM
ok, Quadro.
Thanks for the very fast gathering of answers !

Paolo

mattclary
06-06-2007, 10:27 AM
There is only 180 Euros difference? What is that in dollars? Quadros are usually way more expensive.

If it were me, i would go with the 7300 and take the money saved and buy a better consumer card. Quadros don't add much to LW, especially in the bang for buck category. Personally, I think the 7300 would do fine with LW, so you could even wait a year and get a 8xxx card cheap(er).

Think modularity people. It's the beauty of buying a PC.

AbnRanger
06-06-2007, 12:47 PM
Is this a desktop or Dell laptop? Usually, on a desktop, Dell will let you add just about anything to it...you just have to pay for it. Laptops are the ones with very limited options, and you cannot upgrade your video card afterward like you can with a desktop. For this reason alone, if it is a laptop, I would HIGHLY suggest trying to spring for a model that had a better card in it.
If it is a desktop, I'd certainly go with whichever option comes without an additional charge. Then while you are waiting for it to be shipped, order an ATI HD 2900 XT or NVidia 8800 GTS. These are in the $400USD range, and perform exceptionally well. The NVidia 8800 Ultra is the current king at $650-$700USD.

Pavlov
06-06-2007, 02:16 PM
Desktop... oh well i already placed order with quadro.. yes i can put whatever i need but the warranty covers only some cards. If this one is not good i'll be able to replace it with another but no warranty. i have to take infos on warranty limitations if i change card.

Paolo

Sande
06-06-2007, 02:57 PM
There is only 180 Euros difference? What is that in dollars?
Think modularity people. It's the beauty of buying a PC.
That is roughly 243 dollars. Modularity? Heh :)
You mean buying a PC now and adding a faster graphics card to it a few months later? Then buying a better PSU to support that graphics card, then when you realize you need a better motherboard to use that graphics card (AGP->PCI-e) you buy some new RAM (old motherboard was happy with DDR, the new one needs DDR2) and etc etc. Modularity? PC's are modular only in very short (and therefore very expensive) cycles...

AbnRanger
06-06-2007, 04:39 PM
That is roughly 243 dollars. Modularity? Heh :)
You mean buying a PC now and adding a faster graphics card to it a few months later? Then buying a better PSU to support that graphics card, then when you realize you need a better motherboard to use that graphics card (AGP->PCI-e) you buy some new RAM (old motherboard was happy with DDR, the new one needs DDR2) and etc etc. Modularity? PC's are modular only in very short (and therefore very expensive) cycles...Modular in the sense that you have options and don't have to be stuck with OEM parts if you don't want to. On a laptop about all you can swap out is the RAM and HD.

AbnRanger
06-06-2007, 05:06 PM
By the way, it seems this quadro is based on the GeForce 6800 model:
http://www2.pny.com/Nvidia-Quadro-FX-3450-PCIE-P1792C35.aspx
http://www2.pny.com/6800-GS-PCIe-256MB-P1780C15.aspx
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814133169

It'll probably handle things pretty well cause the 6800 was no slouch.

Sande
06-06-2007, 11:17 PM
Modular in the sense that you have options and don't have to be stuck with OEM parts if you don't want to. On a laptop about all you can swap out is the RAM and HD.
Yep, that is very true. Sorry if I sounded a bit bitter, but that was pretty much what happened to me with my last PC - transition from AGP to PCI-E and socket 754 to socket 939 and AM2 made my hardware obsolete way sooner than I expected... :compbeati

Pavlov
06-07-2007, 01:14 AM
AbnRanger, nice to know... my 6600 is already well performing so if this is better, it's ok.

Paolo

sammael
06-07-2007, 03:02 AM
I have a quadro fx3400, its fine for LW but theres no real advantage over a consumer card as far as I can tell. It does seem to handle whatever I throw at it though and I have not had any major issues with it. Nice solid piece of hardware realy it even plays the latest games.

mattclary
06-07-2007, 06:19 AM
That is roughly 243 dollars. Modularity? Heh :)
You mean buying a PC now and adding a faster graphics card to it a few months later? Then buying a better PSU to support that graphics card, then when you realize you need a better motherboard to use that graphics card (AGP->PCI-e) you buy some new RAM (old motherboard was happy with DDR, the new one needs DDR2) and etc etc. Modularity? PC's are modular only in very short (and therefore very expensive) cycles...

If he gets a 7600GT, he needs no special power supply.

You have to TRY to get an AGP mobo nowadays, so shouldn't be an issue.

WTF is he changing the mobo for? Oh, I see, the non-existent AGP vs. PCI-E thing...


If you plan ahead (especially if you build your own) you can avoid these pitfalls. Yeah, sometimes you might get bitten, but it's pretty rare if you are savy.

mattclary
06-07-2007, 06:22 AM
Yep, that is very true. Sorry if I sounded a bit bitter, but that was pretty much what happened to me with my last PC - transition from AGP to PCI-E and socket 754 to socket 939 and AM2 made my hardware obsolete way sooner than I expected... :compbeati


It's not obsolete man, it's a render node. ;)

lots
06-07-2007, 07:41 AM
That is roughly 243 dollars. Modularity? Heh :)
You mean buying a PC now and adding a faster graphics card to it a few months later? Then buying a better PSU to support that graphics card, then when you realize you need a better motherboard to use that graphics card (AGP->PCI-e) you buy some new RAM (old motherboard was happy with DDR, the new one needs DDR2) and etc etc. Modularity? PC's are modular only in very short (and therefore very expensive) cycles...
If you keep tabs on emerging technologies, its easier to avoid this type of situation. It is possible to have an upgrade path for at least several years.

For example, at this point, it is a fairly safe bet to get a PCI Express video card. Granted PCI Express 2.0 is around the corner, but it is backwards compatible with the current version.

RAM on Intel systems is about to hit DDR3, with AMD to follow in two or three years.

PSU spec has not changed in a while, I don't expect it to change any time soon either. So as long as you've got enough power on the unit now, it should be fine :)

Intel is going to have a socket change for its next CPU (if I recall). So that's something to consider for that upgrade.

Anyway, you can avoid the unfortunate situation of having to upgrade the whole thing to upgrade one thing. It just takes some effort on your part, and some planning.