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VTA
06-02-2007, 09:08 PM
Is Lightwave more dependant on RAM or Processing power?
I don't have much RAM, (1GB), and right now, rendering something that generally isn't as big as I would usually work, I hear the fans kicking up as if working pretty hard. Will RAM help this or no?

I have the Quad Core MacPro.
The output is 2700x1800 with AA 20. No Radiosity.
Thanks for any suggestions.

Bytehawk
06-03-2007, 01:06 AM
imho ram is a bottleneck if you only have 1 gig

the fans kicking in is normal, you should hear mine !

Sande
06-03-2007, 06:06 AM
rendering something that generally isn't as big as I would usually work, I hear the fans kicking up as if working pretty hard. Will RAM help this or no?
Adding RAM doesn't help you with those fans, but 1GiB really is not much when doing 3D nowadays, so I would suggest buying some extra RAM anyway...

Chilton
06-03-2007, 06:08 AM
That 1Gb will be a limiting factor for many things you could do on that quad core Mac. LW won't use any *significant* CPU time except during a render. But that 1Gb means any time you do something even slightly RAM intensive, you're going to start hitting the hard drive for page swapping. And that in turn gets real slow when certain other actions occur (like using Mail.app or sharing volumes).

Also, you'll want the beta UB version of LightWave, which is a free download for all LW 9.x users.

-Chilton

VTA
06-03-2007, 10:36 AM
That 1Gb will be a limiting factor for many things you could do on that quad core Mac. LW won't use any *significant* CPU time except during a render. But that 1Gb means any time you do something even slightly RAM intensive, you're going to start hitting the hard drive for page swapping. And that in turn gets real slow when certain other actions occur (like using Mail.app or sharing volumes).

Also, you'll want the beta UB version of LightWave, which is a free download for all LW 9.x users.

-Chilton

Thanks for the reply's guys...
I ask, mainly because up til now this thing has been whisper quiet, whether struggling through Photoshop or rendering. I know what I have is inadequate, but since the prices have dropped I can upgrade now.

Chilton, I downloaded the 9.2 from my registration area last night. Is that what you're referring to?
Thanks again.

kopperdrake
06-03-2007, 10:40 AM
Hmm - I have the 3Ghz Quad core and even on the most taxing of renders my fans never seem to rise very high. In fact, where it sits next to my feet I never hear the fans kick in at all.

Perhaps as Chilton suggests, your LW is hitting the hard drives to compensate for not enough actual RAM and the Mac is kicking in with its fans to keep the hard drives cool too? I run 5Gb here - I'd stick more in if I were you, see if that makes a difference.

Scazzino
06-03-2007, 03:01 PM
Hmm - I have the 3Ghz Quad core and even on the most taxing of renders my fans never seem to rise very high. In fact, where it sits next to my feet I never hear the fans kick in at all.

Perhaps as Chilton suggests, your LW is hitting the hard drives to compensate for not enough actual RAM and the Mac is kicking in with its fans to keep the hard drives cool too? I run 5Gb here - I'd stick more in if I were you, see if that makes a difference.

Same here.

I can be rendering on all eight cores, and still working on other things modeling, photoshop, surfing, email etc. and the fans don't really increase, it's pretty quiet...

I also use 5GB of RAM. I got it from MacSales.com which has great prices and a lifetime warranty... :thumbsup:

Captain Obvious
06-03-2007, 03:23 PM
3D applications are a bit odd, that way. If you don't have enough memory, it will be HORRENDOUSLY SLOW, regardless of your CPU and video card. However, once you reach that "enough memory" threshold, more memory will not noticably improve performance, and it instead becomes mostly CPU limited. So, suppose you have a beast of an eight-core machine, with half a gig of memory. Now load up a simple scene, and render it, and you're still going to be limited by the CPU. However, if you try to load anything of even moderate complexity, you'll probably crash your 3D application.


Fans kicking in while rendering is to be expected.

Sande
06-04-2007, 02:56 AM
I can be rendering on all eight cores, and still working on other things modeling, photoshop, surfing, email etc. and the fans don't really increase, it's pretty quiet...
Yep, I just love the smooth multitasking multiple cores provide. It almost feels like using Amiga again! :D

avkills
06-04-2007, 08:19 AM
RAM is probably the best thing you can throw into your machine for 3D work. More RAM lets you use larger textures, more of them and also allows for tons more polys. Of course once you start slinging around a lot of polys, a good GPU comes in very handy as well.

The 32bit Mac version of LW is limited to 4GB of RAM; so around 5-6 is probably the sweet spot until the 64bit UB arrives.

-mark

Sande
06-04-2007, 08:30 AM
The 32bit Mac version of LW is limited to 4GB of RAM
-mark
I thought that 32bit applications could only use 3GiB of RAM currently in Tiger?

Captain Obvious
06-04-2007, 08:59 AM
4 gigabyte is the global limit for 32-bit apps in Tiger. Don't know if that applies to LW, though.

Sande
06-04-2007, 01:42 PM
"A 32 bit pointer means that an application can address 2 ^ 32 bytes of memory, or 4GB, at the most. The operating system an application runs on slices that application address space up, so that the application can actually only allocate a part of that address space for itself. Thus, on Windows XP, an application can use 2GB of address space, on Macintosh OS X 10.4, an application gets 3GB, on Windows XP 64-bit edition, a 32-bit application gets nearly 4GB of address space."

Ok, I'm not that familiar with memory management - that was quoted from Scott Byer (http://blogs.adobe.com/scottbyer/2006/12/64_bitswhen.html), Adobe's engineer. So maybe that 3/4GB thing is somekind of theory vs practice issue...?