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shrox
05-07-2007, 07:48 PM
Anybody remember rubylith and stat cameras? And using hot wax to stick things to the bristol board?

Silkrooster
05-07-2007, 09:30 PM
I have read about them, but never had the opportunity to work with them. When I was first learning, I would use the sticky characters and a knife to do my pasteups. Then place that onto a copying machine. Like most everything I have done it was all self taught.
Silk

2BitSculptor
05-07-2007, 10:48 PM
Anybody remember rubylith and stat cameras? And using hot wax to stick things to the bristol board?

Yes...

and rubber cement, scribecote (and direct negative engraving)

Chuck

DogBoy
05-08-2007, 01:57 AM
Ooh, hotwax. I remember going for my first Brazilia..... Oh! THAT hot wax! Yup, remember it well. A bit finicky but kinda fun.
Except when you had to reset your text, which meant sending it to the copy-setter as we didn't have enough machines.

Darth Mole
05-08-2007, 02:01 AM
Yep: used to make magazines with paste-up. We were state of the art - used to type on an Amstrad PCW and then add embedded typesetting commands with an Apricot computer. Don't see many of those around any more...

BazC
05-08-2007, 02:24 AM
I'm afraid so, and cow gum, spraymount and Letraset! Computers must have transformed graphics more than almost any other industry! I trained in Graphic design but became an illustrator. I worked for about 10 years in watercolour, acrylic and gouache. Now I hardly touch them, it's all done in Photoshop and 3d apps, then emailed to the client. How times change!

No more clogged or spitting airbrushes - that's something I DON'T miss lol!

DogBoy
05-08-2007, 03:33 AM
G0d yeah! I'm kinda glad to have given up airbrushing. It was more pain than it was worth. All the maintenance, and faff.

I'm glad that period is behind me now. Though I do miss big markers and the ease of drawing on paper, or the satisfaction of using scalpel on CS10 for cleaning up bad inking or for mist effects.

Wonderpup
05-08-2007, 11:22 AM
I worked in studio where your feet literaly stuck to the carpet because it was coated with a layer of spraymount- god know's what it was doing to our lungs!

The art college I went to trained in hot metal type comps, they were so far behind the times they thought an applemac was some kind of fruit wrapper.

gatz
05-08-2007, 12:55 PM
We are the few that know why the offpage area in Quark or InDesign is called the pasteboard.

I remember taking a typography class and thinking it was pointless drawing type designs by hand when presstype was available. I know better now, but the availablity of digital tools must drive current students crazy.

rg

shrox
05-08-2007, 02:05 PM
Carpet all sticky from Spraymount, yep, I remember that. I used to work at a magazine and a newspaper in Phoenix, AZ. I didn't like the mac print outs because I thought they were too grainy, so I would print it out twice as big, then use a photocopier to shrink it to size.

Darth Mole
05-08-2007, 02:32 PM
I once forgot to add the command to turn off some 72pt title text - the whole article came back on galleys in 72pt. It was about a 100 feet long... that didn't go down well at all.

shrox
05-08-2007, 02:49 PM
Justifing text was the worst, alot of tiny adjustments to get the spacing just right.

I was in art school when the Video Toaster came out, they had a contest to design the logo. The only color computer we had was a desk sized 16 color monster called Via Video.

Morbius
05-08-2007, 03:51 PM
Yup, I remember that too. I use to do layout and paste-ups for a local TV Guild newsprint. I would use these huge clip-art sheets to make little ads with a hot wax machine.

Funny thing is this wasn't that long ago since I was learning LW on the Toster in High School at the time. This was way before LW 4.0 for the PC.

Or was it really that long ago... Now I feel old.

shrox
05-08-2007, 03:58 PM
Yup, I remember that too. I use to do layout and paste-ups for a local TV Guild newsprint. I would use these huge clip-art sheets to make little ads with a hot wax machine.

Funny thing is this wasn't that long ago since I was learning LW on the Toster in High School at the time. This was way before LW 4.0 for the PC.

Or was it really that long ago... Now I feel old.

I think it was 1983 or 84...

Silkrooster
05-08-2007, 09:22 PM
I still have a small print press meant for embedding type into objects like pencils. I believe its 4" x 5" and uses lead type. Looks like an arbor press.
Silk

Gary Wales
05-09-2007, 11:18 AM
I just remember fishing out small pieces of typesetting out of the waxer and scraping off the excess wax! Invariably though it soon came up on the roller once it was run over the page!

Cow Gum...(in Homer Simpson-stylee)...

Bog
05-09-2007, 12:36 PM
I only go back about as far as single-frame tape recorders controlled with (wonky) serial cables.

That's quite far enough for me to feel the fringes of fogeydom impinging on me!

shrox
05-09-2007, 02:03 PM
I only go back about as far as single-frame tape recorders controlled with (wonky) serial cables.

That's quite far enough for me to feel the fringes of fogeydom impinging on me!
Well, I don't feel old, I am 42 now, but my father was 82 when I was born. I figure I'll get at least 100 years out of this body, maybe even 120.

ItsPete
05-09-2007, 03:11 PM
i still have a waxer around here somewhere. not sure why i've kept it. let alone where it even is! i still remember how to shoot seps on a stat cam... yeesh! nowadays, the only crows feet are on my eyes... :)

82? wow. 120... go for it!

ps... you forgot cromalins (one of my very fav) and orange vinyl!

Bog
05-09-2007, 04:46 PM
If your father was 82 when you were born, you should just about start slowing down at 120 with those genes!

*applause*

:D

gerry_g
05-09-2007, 05:17 PM
I had to run a Heidelberg four color platen press as part of my art college training, also had to composite type in a stick, I forget how many times I sliced the side off my finger cutting out galley proofed text with a scalpel, or got Cow Gum bogies in my arm hair.........this was what constituted an appreciation of type and print 35 years ago if you were setting out to be a designer.

safetyman
05-10-2007, 06:23 AM
I remember using a stat camera and typesetting machine in college. What a royal pain that was! A room-sized type camera with it's little trays full of poisonous liquid developer, the endless hours in the dark creating one line of text. Kids today have no clue what we went through to get what can be done in one click now. Jeez, I sound like an old geezer. <goes and looks for rocking chair and cane>

Chris S. (Fez)
05-11-2007, 01:11 PM
Well, I don't feel old, I am 42 now, but my father was 82 when I was born. I figure I'll get at least 100 years out of this body, maybe even 120.

Wow. Are you sure your father is your father? ;) Kidding. I am just jealous of your genes.

If you don't mind, how old was your mother when she had you...?

I just turned 30 and am not too thrilled about it. I feel like I should settle down and finally get married or something.

Unfortunately most of the men in my family seem to go down in flames in their sixties/seventies. So on the shrox scale I am really like 40 now.

T-Light
05-11-2007, 06:25 PM
The most advanced piece of kit we had at college was a wooden silk screen printer and a small vacuum molder. We had a small sales team in once with a 16,000 graphic arts computer, it could have been a small quantel box but I'm not sure, were going back 20 odd years ago. I do know that within 3 or 4 years the Amiga was released and the Commodore machine would have trounced it.

Airbrushes you say, I don't miss the mess but I do miss my nickel plate badger.

Actually no, I DO miss the mess, I miss slicing frisket film across cs10 and not leaving a mark, I miss mixing guache, I miss the trips to the art shop, I miss the face mask to stop your mouth tasting like an easel, I miss my silair compressor, I miss pining through airbrush advertising material, I miss all the airbrush books weighing down my shelves with artists work that would give moden CG a run for it's money, I miss the college promo materials for poly's, Uni's and others.

Bloody Hell I miss all of it. Anyone remember the song "St Elmo's Fire", I was torn between Bournmouth and Pool or getting a couple of mini films together and trying for Beaconsfield at the time. That song was playing right throughout the period leading up to us all making a decision on what we were going to do. My head should have said Bournmouth but my heart said sod it, go for Beaconsfield, make your movies, go for the best (film and tv) school. It never happened, life took over.

Dr Who, where are you?

VisionTecVideo
05-11-2007, 08:56 PM
When my VT4 system crashes the out put signal freezes to a frame that was in the VT edit at the time of the crash. I then always have to re-boot the computer to un-freeze the out put. Is there another "short cut" I can do to un-freeze the frame so I can simply re-start VT4 without havng to completely reboot the computer?

shrox
05-11-2007, 11:38 PM
When my VT4 system crashes the out put signal freezes to a frame that was in the VT edit at the time of the crash. I then always have to re-boot the computer to un-freeze the out put. Is there another "short cut" I can do to un-freeze the frame so I can simply re-start VT4 without havng to completely reboot the computer?

? You probably want to post that under NewTek Discussions > VT[1]-VT[4], this thread is about the pre-VT world...when cut and paste really meant cut and paste.

CMT
05-14-2007, 12:53 PM
I was a bit miffed when I graduated college. Because I had learned all that stuff for the first 3 years of my design education, then computers pretty much made came on strong my last year and a half. Made all that "education" obsolete and had to concentrate on learning the new stuff. Of course that was much easier! :)

shrox
05-14-2007, 01:07 PM
I was a bit miffed when I graduated college. Because I had learned all that stuff for the first 3 years of my design education, then computers pretty much made came on strong my last year and a half. Made all that "education" obsolete and had to concentrate on learning the new stuff. Of course that was much easier! :)

Same thing happened to me. Oh well, I least I can say I knew 3D animation before one could even go to school for it. A friend gave me a copy of 3D Studio (not 3D Max, Studio is what Max replaced, a bad move on Autodesk's part), and I bought a 486DX. Studio was similar to Lightwave in it's ease of use, but then I met Lightwave 4 and that was it. I was in pixel love.

Chrysolithos
05-15-2007, 08:34 AM
I remember cut and pasting (scotch taping, actualy) pictures xeroxed out of a book on explosives for a paper for my technical report writing class back in 81 or so. And in 92 it was single frame recording of Lightwave animation using a BCD controler board in my Amiga 2000. You had to pre-stripe the tape with video and timecode first. I remember learning the trick of recording white rather than black, as it showed missing frames better on playback.

I so don't miss doing that.

NVentive
05-15-2007, 01:21 PM
Anybody remember linatypes? I'm not sure I'm spelling it correctly....
The first paper I worked for was still using those things, they looked like something out of the movie 'Brazil.' They actually molded the lead type as you went, and slid it out to the galley one line at a time. I can't remember how we justified, but I do remember that if we made a typo, we would just smack it with a little hammer so no one would know.....




Stephen Self
old geeser
www.n-vetivetv.com

gerry_g
05-15-2007, 02:21 PM
I think they were called 'Ludlow Machines' or maybe that was just another brand of the same thing, but we had a Ludlow/Linotype machine in the print dept. at our collage, the operator was an old guy in his sixties who already had the tremors in his hands, a well known side effect of exposure to lead fumes ( type is made from an alloy comprising of lead, tin and antimony) the machine could either cast a one line slug of text from an assembled die of brass matrices (letter moulds) or cast single characters to replenish the font cases, and as you say, they were very prevalent in newspaper print rooms.

Surrealist.
05-16-2007, 01:20 PM
Oh yeah. I worked for a breif time with hot wax and printed type in the early 80s.

How about setting led type by hand? Learned that in the a 7th grade class on printing. My dad had a little printing press in his garage too (one that you crank by hand with the rollers) and we could set type there by hand as well. He taught me things I still remember today. He used to make letter head and so on for his business. Even had stats of photos that were transfered to lead plates so you could print a picture. He has a degree in journalism and was a photographer in WWII.

In fact that printing press is still in the garage. That would be an interesting project to model and animate.

Here are some pictures of a very similar machine that is in my dad's garage.

http://b.im.craigslist.org/ON/LT/tfFbmI3RQKyv3qEMtk4VhbWeDtme.jpg

The crank brings the roller over the disc where the ink is. Then the ink is rolled over the type and the paper pressed against it.

http://a.im.craigslist.org/5D/6P/pcIENlMuj3sijgNPV8Ezupaxh6rN.jpg

http://b.im.craigslist.org/sV/B6/VDhpV1WCfmToKzVHUzaLHNyEwz9J.jpg

Found these pictures here (http://santabarbara.craigslist.org/art/322537928.html).

NVentive
05-18-2007, 09:05 AM
Wow -- that's in pretty good shape! Cool.....

JeffrySG
05-19-2007, 09:32 PM
Anybody remember rubylith and stat cameras? And using hot wax to stick things to the bristol board?
Yes, to all three... and remember shooting slides on the film recorder only to ruin them in the dark room, having the hair on your arms get all sticky from spray mount, or video taping the computer screen to 'capture' footage on the computer, and using Photoshop and wishing it had some type of 'layers' or wishing that you could actually work in Illustrator in the Preview mode rather than the b/w artwork mode... hahahah... :D

VisionTecVideo
05-20-2007, 07:30 AM
Hey just remember UMATIC taping and worrying about "generation" loss

shrox
05-20-2007, 07:30 PM
Spray Mount sticks in alot of memories it seems...

Bog
05-20-2007, 08:19 PM
Dear old 3M Spray Mount.

*sighs*

I still remember my old GCSE art teacher taking a whoof of that every time the class got too much for him ;)

Surrealist.
05-20-2007, 10:17 PM
Dear old 3M Spray Mount.

*sighs*

I still remember my old GCSE art teacher taking a whoof of that every time the class got too much for him ;)

:D :D :D

munky
05-23-2007, 03:30 AM
Spraymount!!!!

I used some yesterday. Does that make me really old and living in the past or even just a solvent abuser?

do I need help?



Paul

and I have set type by hand!

T-Light
06-07-2007, 05:59 PM
munky-
[Spraymount] -
Does that make me really old and living in the past or even just a solvent abuser?
Solvent abuser :thumbsup: :neener:

ted
06-08-2007, 12:58 AM
Hey just remember UMATIC taping and worrying about "generation" loss

Funny, I honestly haven't turned on our old 3/4 deck on over a year. Just this week we made well over a grand dubbing old 3/4" tapes to DVD for a client. Glad I kept it in the edit bay and didn't sell it on e-bay for a couple hundred! :)

I remember when we got our first 3/4" decks at the station I worked for. WOW!!! We could scan the tape and see the video unlike the old 2" reel to reel machines or loading the film projectors! Umatic was a BIG step in our industry.
Hard to believe I've been in Broadcast for over 30 years. Of course I started at 18. Time flies, so have all the fun you can. I know I am!

ColinSmith
06-08-2007, 02:56 AM
Just found my first previs lying about the office. 6x4 photo, blown up to A4 on a b+w copier, drafting film over the top and traced up with the Rotring pens, new bits sketched in.... copied, hand coloured....

Ah Rotring pens...... 30minutes out of every hour with the damned 0.18 under the hot tap, trying to persuade it to not clog up..... ;-)

mrpapabeis
06-08-2007, 09:27 AM
1972- Apprentice to Themis Tsironis, then photographer. Developed huge B&W prints using a projector with print paper on a wall in the basement. Used troughs for developer/fixer. Always smelled like chemicals.

1986- Macintosh plus, 1mgb ram two floppies, 30 mgb external. 3D app:super 3D. Loaded from a floppy. Used "Performer" software to sync Audio Multitrack to Video using a Zeta 3 Timecode synchronizer. Triggered an E-Mu sampler with a whopping 14 sec sampling time.

1998- G3 laptop OS 9.2. Still in use today at home as email/internet portal.

2007- Daughter attending film school at Florida State Univeristy.

GP