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yshakoor
02-20-2003, 07:03 AM
I have LW 7.5. I am trying to output print resolution RGB files. There used to be a print resolution option in earlier versions of LW. I cannot find it in 7.5.

How can I output print resolution files? I appreciate any help I can get.

Skonk
02-20-2003, 08:00 AM
For print u just need to use a very high resolution, i did some renders for print on a4 size and the ppl i was doing them for asked for them to be atleast 4000*3000 pixels. Really bogged down my pc since iv only got 512 meg of ram but it wasn't really a problem.

James..

Schwing
02-20-2003, 11:25 AM
In an earlier thread, a LW user mentioned a Photoshop plug-in they have used for increasing image resolutions. Pro-Prints by LizardTech. They've got a demo you can download. I gave it a whirl, and it's not too bad.

http://www.lizardtech.com/

Earl
02-20-2003, 04:31 PM
All files that come out of LightWave will be 72dpi. Nothing can change that. All you have to do is figure out what the pixel by pixel size is that is required to produce the final image/dpi. For instance, if you need a 11x17 print at 300dpi, you'd render out at 3300x5100 pixels. Then take that image and adjust the dpi to 300. If you're in Photoshop, it will try to blow it up. DON'T LET IT. With the dpi set to 300, in the Pixel Dimensions, change the units in the drop down box from pixels to percent, then change the percent back to 100. Your image will remain exactly the same (pixel by pixel), but the dpi is now appropriate for your output. If Photoshop has to process this change, then you've done something wrong and it's interpolating the hell out of your image.

The above process is easier in Corel Photo-Paint, simply change the dpi and check the box "Maintain original size."

There's a plugin for LightWave which will set your render size (in pixels) for you. You tell it the size in inches/dpi, and it will do the math. It's called PrintAssist. I would link you to it, but our STUPID network surf control at work has decided to block me from Flay.com. Funny, one day it lets me browse the site, the next day it deems it "Sexually Explicit."

With PrintAssist, you still have to change the dpi to the intended value after rendering. Again, Photoshop or Photo-Paint will do this easy enough.

kenmac
02-20-2003, 08:18 PM
Rendering large images is a real pain in the #@(!....
I do it often and have to resort to rendering sections and then pasting them together in PhotoShop.
The only advice I can give is RAM...The more the better.
Ken Mac

meatycheesyboy
02-21-2003, 02:13 AM
Earl,

A much easier way to do it in Photoshop is to just uncheck 'resample image' before you change the dpi. Then you don't have to do the extra step of setting the size percentage back to 100.

Lightwolf
02-21-2003, 02:13 AM
Originally posted by Earl
All files that come out of LightWave will be 72dpi. Nothing can change that.

Not quite true, technically LW doesn't have anything to do with dpi's, and doesn't even save dpi information (some image savers might, but then they put in default values). Many image formats don't even support dpi information (.tga for example).
dpi is an information that is only useful in a print world anyhow (yes, I know, flamebait...).


Originally posted by Earl
...Then take that image and adjust the dpi to 300. If you're in Photoshop, it will try to blow it up. DON'T LET IT. With the dpi set to 300, in the Pixel Dimensions, change the units in the drop down box from pixels to percent, then change the percent back to 100. Your image will remain exactly the same (pixel by pixel), but the dpi is now appropriate for your output. If Photoshop has to process this change, then you've done something wrong and it's interpolating the hell out of your image.

The above process is easier in Corel Photo-Paint, simply change the dpi and check the box "Maintain original size."


It's easier in Photoshop as well. Just unselect the lowest checkbox in the image size window (I don't know the english label since I use a german version of PS, probably "Compute" or something like that, the one with the bicubic dropdown next to it), and enter your new dpi information. Presto! Same as Corel Draw.

If you can't find Printassist, the math is quite simple.
Get your final size in inches (w x h) and your final rendering size is:
Width = w * dpi
Height = h * dpi
Keep in mind that you should actually use lpi and not dpi in the above calculation. There is not point in rendering with 600dpi for a printer that has a resolution of 600dpi, since dpi are on/off dots. It depends on how the printer rasters the image.

Lightwolf
02-21-2003, 02:16 AM
Originally posted by meatycheesyboy
Earl,

A much easier way to do it in Photoshop is to just uncheck 'resample image' before you change the dpi. Then you don't have to do the extra step of setting the size percentage back to 100.

Looks like you beat me to it... Now I know what it is called the english V of PS.

Earl
02-21-2003, 12:00 PM
Ahh, thanks for the Photoshop tip! I didn't even consider unchecking that... :rolleyes:

Matt
02-21-2003, 07:32 PM
Print Assistant sucks, use this by Eki, much better . . .

yshakoor
02-21-2003, 09:42 PM
Thanks for all the help!!