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starmountain
04-23-2007, 11:45 AM
I'd like to know if anyone is shooting live events using multiple PTZ cameras and switching live with a Tricaster. If so, what cameras and controllers are you using. Primarily I'm interested in shooting conference speakers with multiple cameras and doing it all myself.

Thanks!

-Scott

dbsnetwork
04-23-2007, 02:39 PM
I have a client using SONY PTZ cameras (3) for church services.

Rmarq
04-24-2007, 01:18 PM
I am using Sony EVI D70 with a Sony RMBR300 controller, I think it can control up to 8 cameras, has recall positions. We use a Tricaster with 3 cameras to record hockey games. The cameras are in fixed locations in the rink. We will be using the same type of set up to record our municipal board meetings.

Works real slick and simple.

Jim Brown
04-24-2007, 09:48 PM
As I read your post we have just completed an international meeting of Delta Epsilon Chi here in Orlando. This conference had 1200 or so college kids from around the country.

We used 3 Sony BRC300s with the Tricaster Pro. We have done a number of these events like this. (4 last month). They feature camera inputs as well as lots of VCR prerecorded segments, stills, and ppts. The BRC300 is Sony's 3 chip camera. We went to these PTZ to save space on the event floor. (planners call them seats). Seems a camera platform with an operator blocking the view is not acceptable with these large groups that are always trying to seat one more! We drove 2 projectors with the Tricater Pro.

We have also placed these into houses of worship where they do not want a visible camera and operator. Of course, Tricater Pro is ultimate companion.

Hope this helps. If we can help, just give us a call. Call Mike, my son. He is the owner of the company.

Jim Brown
M&M Productions USA
800 711-0140

Jim Davis
04-24-2007, 10:30 PM
I have installed several of the Sony EVI D70 with a Sony RMB 300 controller for clients and they seem to wortk out good. We put together a portable case for the Tricaster and keyboard and mouse and second road case with the cameras controller and cables. A nice compact mobile setup.

starmountain
05-17-2007, 11:48 PM
:thumbsup:

-Scott

seductive media
06-29-2007, 12:04 PM
We plan on using this set up with the new triCaster Studio

Im trying to install 3 - Sony D70 PTZ Cameras with a Sony RM-BR300 Remote Control. Im using RS-232C cables to daisy chain the cameas together using network cables in between the RS-232C cable adapters.

I cannot get the remote to control any of the cameras. im new to this and not sure if im missing a setting or something.... you guys seem to know what your doing and have done this type of setup before.

Any help you can give would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you very much.

-Erick H

Jim Brown
06-29-2007, 12:54 PM
First step is to power up the cameras first, then the controller. The controller must poll the cameras and set an address.

If that doesn't work, then take a single camera and using your network cable to serial adapter cable, attach a short network cable and try it one at a time.

If you can't get one working this way, you cannot get the three working.

Did you leave the dip switch settings on the bottom as they came out of the box. They should be set to rs232, 9600 baud right out of the box. Those switches are teeny tiny and hard to tell what direction they are set to. Check them carefully.

My .02 worth. If you still have problems give me a call. 865 607-7195

Jim

CreatvGnius
06-29-2007, 01:28 PM
We plan on using this set up with the new triCaster Studio

Im trying to install 3 - Sony D70 PTZ Cameras with a Sony RM-BR300 Remote Control. Im using RS-232C cables to daisy chain the cameas together using network cables in between the RS-232C cable adapters.

I cannot get the remote to control any of the cameras. im new to this and not sure if im missing a setting or something.... you guys seem to know what your doing and have done this type of setup before.

Any help you can give would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you very much.

-Erick H
Well, E -- is it possible you should've employed RS-422 connectivity, instead? I'm not at all sure, just thought I'd toss in a guess, while you're waiting for a more definitive reply.:hey:

seductive media
06-29-2007, 02:40 PM
I plugges a camera directly into the remote with a regular 232 serial cable and it worked.

Is it possible that I need to use 'crossover' network cables instead of standard ones?

seductive media
06-29-2007, 02:50 PM
I plugges a camera directly into the remote with a regular 232 serial cable and it worked.

Is it possible that I need to use 'crossover' network cables instead of standard ones?

Jim Brown
06-29-2007, 03:12 PM
Where did you get your adapter cables? (From rs232 (round cable) to an RJ45)

You should not have to use a crossover cable. Just plain ethernet cables. So....try plugging one of your adapter cables into the camera input and then use an eternet connector block and connect an adapter cable directly to the controller. It should work just like plugging in a standard rs232 cable. If it does not then take a look at your adapter cables.

Here is where I get mine.
http://stores.ebay.com/Wirenest-Dot-Com_VISCA-Camera-Control-Cables_W0QQcolZ4QQdirZ1QQfsubZ3488125QQftidZ2QQtZk m

Jim

CreatvGnius
06-29-2007, 06:12 PM
Where did you get your adapter cables? (From rs232 (round cable) to an RJ45)

You should not have to use a crossover cable. Just plain ethernet cables. So....try plugging one of your adapter cables into the camera input and then use an eternet connector block and connect an adapter cable directly to the controller. It should work just like plugging in a standard rs232 cable. If it does not then take a look at your adapter cables.

Here is where I get mine.
http://stores.ebay.com/Wirenest-Dot-Com_VISCA-Camera-Control-Cables_W0QQcolZ4QQdirZ1QQfsubZ3488125QQftidZ2QQtZk m

Jim
What a coincidence [or is it?] that this thread should come up at the end of the very week in which I had been researching a 2-camera system with controller, featuring the Sony D70s.

Only, I'm really befuddled over whether there be any advantage in purchasing the Sony RMB300 hardware controller, vs. purchasing $1,000 software designed by a guy who's really knowledgeable about camera robotics -- which enables one to control the cameras with their own PC (with the capability of adjusting the D70s' contrast, white balance, brightness (the usual remote CCU type controls), etc.

What benefits are there in the $1500 Sony RMB300 hardware, other than its ability to control up to 8 cams (more than I'll ever need)? Any and all suggestions encouraged, and appreciated, gang!:confused:

Jim Brown
06-30-2007, 04:03 AM
Depends on how they will be used and by whom.

We provide these PTZ cameras in a lot of churches where you have volunteer users with little of no training. The objective is to keep it simple. In those cases, no question use the Sony.

If your program features a lot of predetermined shots with little or no movement during the show, then a pc approach is great because you can store so many more presets. That works great in security applications also.

If it is like a church service where you have a preset on the pulpit, but then adjust by following the speaker then a joystick is almost mandatory. The Sony controller is essential in this environment. I also have found the Sony to have less lag time than a pc. Nothing worse than trying to follow a 'walking' preacher than to have a half second or even quarter second delay time on the pan control.

We also use the Vaddio controller which is a compromise between the two in that it provides more locally stored presets, but still provides a good quality joystick for control. Check it out at www.vaddio.com. If you think you might be interested let me know as we are a dealer for it. It is about 20% more than the Sony.

Hope this helps some.

Jim

seductive media
06-30-2007, 09:40 AM
Where did you get your adapter cables? (From rs232 (round cable) to an RJ45)

You should not have to use a crossover cable. Just plain ethernet cables. So....try plugging one of your adapter cables into the camera input and then use an eternet connector block and connect an adapter cable directly to the controller. It should work just like plugging in a standard rs232 cable. If it does not then take a look at your adapter cables.

Here is where I get mine.
http://stores.ebay.com/Wirenest-Dot-Com_VISCA-Camera-Control-Cables_W0QQcolZ4QQdirZ1QQfsubZ3488125QQftidZ2QQtZk m

Jim

I got those same adapters from eBay and have plain 50ft eithernet cables in between connecting the cameras. - I tryed connectingh two adapters togethwer without the eithernet cable and that still did not work.... frustrating!? :confused:

is it possible the adapters may be the problem?

Jim Brown
06-30-2007, 07:33 PM
Connect the two adapter cables together through your ethernet joiner block. If they do not work then, it has to be the adapter cables.

Jim

seductive media
07-03-2007, 01:50 PM
GOT IT! The adapter cables come in black and white pairs.... ha

jfxm3
04-04-2008, 02:29 PM
I just shot a workshop last night as a one man band. I have a few questions about using a TriCaster 100, 3 Sony EVI-D70 cameras and a Sony RMBR300 controller package.
1. What is the best way to match your 3 Sony EVI-D70 cameras prior to shooting?
2. What is the longest connection via a) ethernet cable from PC to TriCaster b) DVI cable from TriCaster to projector being used with consistent success?
3. After recording to the internal drive, the speaker asked me to remove the panel discussions that took place at various points throughout the workshop. What is the fastest way to take a recorded program and chop it up doing a fast edit, specifically removing all of the undesirable clips on site for the customer?
Thanks for your time and advice!
John

amospro
04-06-2008, 02:44 PM
Damn, You guys are going to cost me a lot of money with all these toys. Those look like nice cameras. Being only a single 1/4 CCD, how is the quality of the image? Do they work well in low light? Maybe I'll save money in the long run without having to pay extra camera ops. Not being able to slap tapes in them for back up is the only thing that worrys me.

jfxm3
04-06-2008, 11:58 PM
Damn, You guys are going to cost me a lot of money with all these toys. Those look like nice cameras. Being only a single 1/4 CCD, how is the quality of the image? Do they work well in low light? Maybe I'll save money in the long run without having to pay extra camera ops. Not being able to slap tapes in them for back up is the only thing that worrys me.

The quality of these cameras is pretty good for a single chip. Since I have the TriCaster 100 (without camera auto calibrate feature) I am trying to figure out the best way to "chip" my cameras so they match. They worked well in low light, although it is tough to go into manual mode as a one man band. I noticed the focus trying to dial in when the lights were turned down for PowerPoint presentations in low light. I am not concerned with the ISO recordings of each camera since at this point my primary clients are long format workshops/seminars. In the future, I am going to consider my minimum crew two, just so the load in & out is easier and someone can make adjustments on the fly without stopping the production. In 6 shoots I have recouped the cost of my cameras and controller. Don't forget if you need better quality there are the 3 chip BRC-300 although I am considering adding Canon XH-A1 because of the gorgeous picture. I am also considering the TriCaster Studio upgrade to go beyond three cameras and the Virtual Set technology.

billmi
04-07-2008, 06:38 AM
Damn, You guys are going to cost me a lot of money with all these toys. Those look like nice cameras. Being only a single 1/4 CCD, how is the quality of the image? Do they work well in low light? Maybe I'll save money in the long run without having to pay extra camera ops. Not being able to slap tapes in them for back up is the only thing that worrys me.

Biggest place I notice an issue is on high contrast lines that are slightly angled off of horizontal. There is some color artifacting to them - pretty typical for a smaller chip single-CCD camera. Since we (my church) distribute primarily on the web, which gets scaled down, it's a non-issue. Their zoom has a surprising amount of reach.

billmi
04-07-2008, 06:39 AM
3. After recording to the internal drive, the speaker asked me to remove the panel discussions that took place at various points throughout the workshop. What is the fastest way to take a recorded program and chop it up doing a fast edit, specifically removing all of the undesirable clips on site for the customer?
Thanks for your time and advice!
John

See the "Edit" tab on the Tricaster interface? Click it, and it will open up the editor. You can follow through the Tricaster manual for instructions on how to use it. It's got a rather fast interface for quick-cutting a project.

jfxm3
04-14-2008, 06:53 AM
I have the TriCaster 100 (without camera auto calibrate feature) and I am trying to figure out the best way to "chip" or match my 3 Sony EVI-D70 cameras so they match. I am using the Sony RM BR300 controller if that makes any difference. Any suggestions besides upgrading to one of the models with auto calibrate? I am sure someone out there has figured out a quick and clever way to do this.
Thanks for your time and advice!

jfxm3
04-14-2008, 07:19 AM
See the "Edit" tab on the Tricaster interface? Click it, and it will open up the editor. You can follow through the Tricaster manual for instructions on how to use it. It's got a rather fast interface for quick-cutting a project.

Do I have to move the entire program into the edit bin? I didn't come across a "split video/audio at playhead" feature in the editing options. If I am removing a 3 minute discussion out of a 60 minute workshop what would you recommend? I have never had an occasion to use the edit features on my Tricaster. All editing has been done on FCP and imported.
Thanks for your time and advice!

SBowie
04-14-2008, 08:28 AM
If you recorded the entire program in one continuous pass, it will be one file.

There are several ways to do this, but the easiest is to load the full program clip into the editor, click Render, use the Start Frame/End Frame controls on the right in the Render panel to set i/o points for the render, pick a suitable format in "Render to", set a file name an path, and click Render.

D3Cast
04-14-2008, 10:39 AM
If you recorded the entire program in one continuous pass, it will be one file.

There are several ways to do this, but the easiest is to load the full program clip into the editor, click Render, use the Start Frame/End Frame controls on the right in the Render panel to set i/o points for the render, pick a suitable format in "Render to", set a file name an path, and click Render.I think jfxm3 has the TC-100, which doesn't have the "Render" i/o points -- just a "Prepare For VCR" button. 8~

-s

CreatvGnius
04-14-2008, 10:44 AM
Do I have to move the entire program into the edit bin? I didn't come across a "split video/audio at playhead" feature in the editing options. If I am removing a 3 minute discussion out of a 60 minute workshop what would you recommend?

I'm not sure why you're requesting a "split video/audio at playhead" functionality, given that you seem to want to simply remove a 3 minute portion out of the 60 minute program. Therefore, I'll provide the latter first -- then I'll attempt to address the issue of splitting audio from its video counterpart (if that's what you mean).

Look at the EDIT MEDIA section of your manual for a simpler presentation of what I'm suggesting here...

Once you've imported the 60 minute clip into the EDIT MEDIA panel,
1. click on the A/V clip (both audio and video portions will highlight)
2a. Drag the Play Bar to the frame that you want to be the "beginning of the portion you're going to remove", then hit "M" on they keyboard. You've just placed a clip marker there. If you don't care to mark the edit point here, but instead want to immediately cut the A/V clip here, continue to...

2b. Simply hit the keyboard shortcut "C" to razor that portion of the A/V clip (note, you don't *have* to employ a clip marker if you don't want to)

3. If you wish, enable TIMELINE RIPPLE (On TriCaster STUDIO, it's a gadget that's midway down the right side of the EDIT MEDIA interface.

4. Next, cut the A/V clip at the end point of the portion you wish to have removed from the video discussion: Drag or scrub the Play Bar to the appropriate frame, then hit "C" to cut or "razor" there.

5. Since you've enabled "Timeline Ripple", you can now click once on the A/V clip that's situated between the two cuts, then hit the DELETE key on your keyboard. You've just deleted the portion you wish to remove.

6. Now, you might wish to perform a cross-dissolve -- or fade to white transition, or what-have-you, so as to finish the look of those two edit points.

I haven't addressed the matter of "splitting the audio and video" up to this point, because I'm not certain of what you wish to accomplish.

While I'm unsure of that, I'll offer you the this: On TriCaster STUDIO, if I want to adjust the audio, independent of the video, I have simply done the following: Either:

A. Click once on the Audio portion of the A/V clip, then tweaked the start or end of that audio clip's length gadget. Now I can independently adjust the audio, without disturbing the video.

or...

B. Clone the A/V Clip then remove the video portion of that clone, so you have an extra instance of the audio

1.Hover your mouse over the A/V clip you wish to clone and subsequently obtain an independent Audio clip instance from.

2. With a finger on your left hand, depress "V" on your keyboard, and while doing so -- drag in a downward direction, the A/V clip -- and you'll see a clone is newly created. continue holding down the "V" (this constrains your dragging operation in the vertical -- preventing you from accidentally slipping the clip forward or backward in time in the editor. Rest that new instance on an unused strip in the editor.

3. If you want only the extra instance of audio, then disable the video by using the clicking once on the video the right-click; a sub-menu appears. Scroll down to "DISABLE VIDEO" .

Now you've got an additional instance of the audio, on a separate strip, ready to edit without disturbing your original audio or video track.

That just one of several possible ways to split audio and video. I'll let others chime in for a simpler approach, once they've determined just what you are looking to do.

With your manual open to the chapter on EDIT MEDIA, I'm sure some of this will eventually prove quite useful to you, if not at the present time. Be well! :)
-PeterG

SBowie
04-14-2008, 11:01 AM
I think jfxm3 has the TC-100, which doesn't have the "Render" i/o points -- just a "Prepare For VCR" button. 8~Oops, sorry - I'm not much help with the older UI. :(

CreatvGnius
04-14-2008, 11:10 AM
I think jfxm3 has the TC-100, which doesn't have the "Render" i/o points -- just a "Prepare For VCR" button. 8~

-sWow. I like the approach Steve is suggesting (barring that lack of "RENDER I/O" option available in TriCaster PRO FX and TriCaster STUDIO.

For the record, a more concise adaptation of what I've conveyed earlier might be:
1. Go to the editor.
2. Import the recorded 60-minute A/V clip.
3. Perform the two cuts -- one at the beginning of the undesirable 3-minute segment, and another at the end of the undesirable segment, by hitting the "C" key at each of the two edit points.
4. Create a cross-fade or some other appropriate transition between the two remaining "desirable" segments (which in this case, totals about 57 minutes)
5. With the Prepare for VCR button, render out the new edit.

D3Cast
04-14-2008, 12:05 PM
5. With the Prepare for VCR button, render out the new edit.Which will, of course, take a while -- I think that's what John was trying to avoid. But yeah, that's it, unless you bring the original AVI to another editing platform (which, of course, needs the NT25 codec) and do it there.

John -- once the offending :D footage is removed, what's the final destination of the material? Windows Media archive? DVD? The ultimate formatting of the end content may help suggest where and how to edit it. But with the TC-100, you're pretty much going to wind up hitting that "Prepare for VCR" button at some point.

And since it'll take a while, PeterG will undoubtedly counsel you on the sagacity of having a sturdy UPS system in place... :neener:

-s

CreatvGnius
04-14-2008, 12:21 PM
And since it'll take a while, PeterG will undoubtedly counsel you on the sagacity of having a sturdy UPS system in place... :neener:

-s
:ohmy:
Now that was funny. [Turning about face, nearly choking on saliva, while moving toward the bookshelf to grab a dictionary...]
...Lemme' see. :confused: sa-GA-ci-ty...

-PeterG

SBowie
04-14-2008, 12:45 PM
Again, not well-versed in the 'classic' TC, but maybe you could trim the clip in a DDR, then Capture the Program stream while playing it - but that's kind of a desperate act. ;)

CreatvGnius
04-14-2008, 03:41 PM
Again, not well-versed in the 'classic' TC, but maybe you could trim the clip in a DDR, then Capture the Program stream while playing it - but that's kind of a desperate act. ;)To improve upon Steve's recommendation of this "desperate act", might be this:

1. Load the offending 60-minute clip in the TriCaster "VCR" (sic) -- which for our purposes, I'm very much tempted to refer to as a "DAP" (Digital Assets Player) :D
2. Load the very same 60-minute clip again, in the same VCR. Actually, you simply want to make a copy of the first clip and paste it below it in the self-same player. (You could try hitting CTRL+C then CTRL=V to see if that'll do it. Never tried that in a TriCaster VCR, buy I have a hunch it'll work)

3. On the first clip instance in that "VCR", quickly fast-advance to the beginning of that 3-minute discussion portion you want extricated. (refer to your TriCaster manual for assist if need be)

4. Hit "O" on the keyboard, to mark the Out-Point of the first clip instance.
5. Go to the 2nd instance of that same clip within the TriCaster VCR, and quickly advance to the end of the 3-minute discussion you want redacted from the 60 minute recording, then hit "I" on the keyboard to mark the "In-Point" for that clip.
6. On that very same second clip instance, place your cursor near the end ("tail") of the clip, and swipe your mouse toward the left, so as to define the point where you just completed the fade to black (you did do that during the shoot, yes?)
7. Optionally, you could also trim the start of the first clip instance (hit "I" when you're at the location where you'd really like that first clip to start).

8. Now, with the TriCaster "VCR" set up with VCR AUDIO properly feeding the TriCaster Audio Mixer (with adequate gain, peaking into the yellow area, but never into the red zone on the VU meters...) play the VCR in "LIST" mode (not SELECTION mode) while you have a Video Deck (or DVD Recorder) connected to TriCaster's S-Video and Stereo Audio Outputs.

Hit RECORD on your Video Record Deck, and you'll have a first-generation copy of your edit, recorded in real-time. That should take just under an hour to complete (your program will be about 57 minutes, after you've deleted that 3-minute discussion portion, right?)

I would fervently insist you employ a decent Battery Back-Up -- commonly reffered to as "UPS" Uninterruptible Power Supply), but one which includes Automatic Voltage Regulation or power conditioning circuitry when powering your TriCaster and a connected Record deck.

This use of UPS with power conditioning circuitry will ensure you've got clean A.C. power going to your TriCaster and your Record machine, to assist in providing best image quality and also to mitigate against AC line noise and other power irregularities which will mar performance, if not utterly shorten the very life of your equipment.


:2guns::dance: [Tee-hee! Snicker, snort!]
--PeterG

jfxm3
04-21-2008, 05:09 AM
Which will, of course, take a while -- I think that's what John was trying to avoid. But yeah, that's it, unless you bring the original AVI to another editing platform (which, of course, needs the NT25 codec) and do it there.

John -- once the offending :D footage is removed, what's the final destination of the material? Windows Media archive? DVD? The ultimate formatting of the end content may help suggest where and how to edit it. But with the TC-100, you're pretty much going to wind up hitting that "Prepare for VCR" button at some point.

And since it'll take a while, PeterG will undoubtedly counsel you on the sagacity of having a sturdy UPS system in place... :neener:

-s

The final destination changes, however, this recent example was to DVD. Thanks for your thoughts and ideas!