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View Full Version : FREE-(Limited Time)-New Orleans French Quarter Building



McFilms
03-29-2007, 10:27 PM
Hey'lo all,

Here's a freebie for the Community. Thanks folks, for all the help!:thumbsup: I'll only be able to host it a short time, and beware because the file size is 35megs (FYI, for dial up users). Free for use in commercial or non-commercial renders.
http://hometown.aol.com/roch222/ , made the iron work piece, which was downloaded and manipulated extensively through modeler and reassembled for the signature "French Quarter" look.
The building file is here: http://www.macartscreations.com/FrQrtr01.zip

the sample pic is here:http://www.macartscreations.com/FRQ01.png


Cheers, and happy rendering!


Mac

LightWuv
03-30-2007, 08:13 PM
Hey,

Thanks! Renders fine, this one :thumbsup:

Wuv

Eric Walters
04-01-2007, 02:35 PM
THANKSSSS!

Eric


Hey'lo all,

Here's a freebie for the Community. Thanks folks, for all the help!:thumbsup: I'll only be able to host it a short time, and beware because the file size is 35megs (FYI, for dial up users). Free for use in commercial or non-commercial renders.
http://hometown.aol.com/roch222/ , made the iron work piece, which was downloaded and manipulated extensively through modeler and reassembled for the signature "French Quarter" look.
The building file is here: http://www.macartscreations.com/FrQrtr01.zip

the sample pic is here:http://www.macartscreations.com/FRQ01.png


Cheers, and happy rendering!


Mac

toby
04-01-2007, 09:53 PM
That's excellent, very generous of you. Thanks!

McFilms
04-02-2007, 09:06 AM
Hey folks,

Everyone is quite welcome. Small price to pay for benefiting from all the knowledge found here. I'll try to host it through this week and into the weekend.

LightWuv, killer render there! What were your globals set for?


Plus, I see my big 'ol booboo on one of my shutters! (dangit, stupid me):foreheads:

LightWuv
04-02-2007, 05:05 PM
McFilms,

I used your house to test FPrime 3, should have let it cook for longer, but instead I put the render through Virtual Darkroom to "mask" the grain. Monte Carlo 2 bounces, and a few very small texture changes that don't really show up.

Again thanks for the freebie! Next time it's on us :thumbsup:

Wuv

McFilms
04-03-2007, 11:44 AM
LightWuv:

I looked up the Virtual Darkroom plugin, found the site for it, but the download link isn't good (and it is for Intel platforms while I'm on a iMac G5).

FPrime sounds very cool. I bought G2, which does very well, but when I was able to upgrade from LW8 to 9 I wondered if G2 was even necessary. (I'll probably still use it, just in case.)
Is there something out there that is comparable that will run on OS X?

re: boo boo
On the front view you rendered I saw one of the shutters is upside down (oy!). Thankfully, it is one of the few shutters that are slightly on an angle from the building face and can be separated and reset fairly easily (On the aesthetics/overly critical thingy, it's just me, being an artist who looks over his work for errors, and ends up slapping his forehead repeatedly when each mistake is found, etc...)

McFilms
04-03-2007, 12:05 PM
LightWuv:

I looked up the Virtual Darkroom plugin, found the site for it, but the download link isn't good (and it is for Intel platforms while I'm on a iMac G5).

FPrime sounds very cool. I bought G2, which does very well, but when I was able to upgrade from LW8 to 9 I wondered if G2 was even necessary. (I'll probably still use it, just in case.)
Is there something out there that is comparable that will run on OS X?

re: boo boo
On the front view you rendered I saw one of the shutters is upside down (oy!). Thankfully, it is one of the few shutters that are slightly on an angle from the building face and can be separated and reset fairly easily (On the aesthetics/overly critical thingy, it's just me, being an artist who looks over his work for errors, and ends up slapping his forehead repeatedly when each mistake is found, etc...)

LightWuv:
Aakkk! I do have the plugin after all (was this included in LW9?)! After reading the posts, I started digging around in the "image processing" section, and found the plugin in the Image Filter list. If it was not included in LW9, I must have, during my scouring of the net for free plugins, downloaded it (ignoring the Intel only bit) and added it to the digital weapons. I've tried it and it works fine on my iMac (so pass the word to Mac users).

If this was included in LW9, THANKS NEWTEK!!!

p.s.
The parameters for Virtual Darkroom are complicated as any in the software overall. Would you mind sharing how you set up Virtual Darkroom for your render you posted here?

T-Light
04-03-2007, 12:10 PM
Virtual darkroom should be in your scene/image processing/add image filter dropdown, it comes with LW :)

edit - oops, too late.

McFilms
04-03-2007, 04:30 PM
There's Mr. T-Light! Thanks a bunchly for the info! Got my stainless steel hemisphere hdri sampling up and running, and for less than $100.00 US aside from the digital camera which I pimped my working self off to pay for...


Brent, I am wondering; Can hdri images of actual lights be projected through LW's spot lights, and still relay the full range of the info needed?

Jez wondering, since hdri are reflections of actual lights and carry forth some of not most of the info needed to light the scene (with supplemental lighting, as you mentioned before). I thought, "Why don't I just point the lights toward the Canon A510 digital cam, with a black backdrop drop, make the hdri and project that?" I will probably try to filter a bit (and hope I don't mess up my cam). I should be ok. Other techs say that in the tube camera (video) days it was terrible to have direct light into the lense, but with chip cameras there should be no burn.

Or, is it even simpler to just enable "Interpolated" radiosity, map the sampled "real world lights" hdri to a flat plane object(s), and use it for the light with the scene's light set to 0 and the scene ambiance set to 100%?

(or, am I just reinventing the wheel here?)


Mac

LightWuv
04-05-2007, 08:19 PM
McFilms,

Late reply, sorry. Yeah, it's the Virtual Darkroom pixel filter included in LW - at least since 7.5 (when I started using the program).

Settings for this was as basic as can be - Kodak Gold 100 Color, as far as I recall.

Here's a before and after on a test render I just did that doesn't show the result very well (no grain on this one) :D

G2; yeah, I got it cheap from another user a while back, good stuff. I use FPrime a bit more though.

Wuv

McFilms
04-05-2007, 09:40 PM
McFilms,

Late reply, sorry. Yeah, it's the Virtual Darkroom pixel filter included in LW - at least since 7.5 (when I started using the program).

Settings for this was as basic as can be - Kodak Gold 100 Color, as far as I recall.

Here's a before and after on a test render I just did that doesn't show the result very well (no grain on this one) :D

G2; yeah, I got it cheap from another user a while back, good stuff. I use FPrime a bit more though.

Wuv


No biggie LightWuv! I know all are far too busy to necessarily keep up a constant conversation (unless there's a good rant going).:beerchug:

Gotta love those filters. Between those, the new camera setup, and some means to have the most accurate lighting reproduced you can match real world shots very well.

T-Light
04-06-2007, 10:36 AM
Wow, sorry old man, how late am I? :rolleyes:

Not entirely certain what you mean, what is you're lighting?

My intial thoughts are HDR works really well when you have a lot of range, many many thousands to 1. Most standard lighting (room lighting etc) doesn't really show that kind of range, at least it doesn't when I've tried (anyone out there had much success?)


Brent, I am wondering; Can hdri images of actual lights be projected through LW's spot lights, and still relay the full range of the info needed?
Nice idea :thumbsup: Answer is I don't know, never tried it. I suppose rather than using a silver ball you could set up the camera and tripod to point directly at the spot, then make all the exposures neccessary to capture the info, make your hdri, use that as your spot image. BUT, this wouldn't give you an HDRI spot as the intensity of your spotlight (like all LW lights) is controlled by your percentage intensity settings, you'd have to boost that up by hand which would require a lot of tweaking and does away with the automatic power of the hdri in the first place. Don't know how much sense that makes, unfortunately, it's all guesswork on my part.

Without knowing your scene it's difficult to contribute. What you could try is switching off all spotlights on your real set and take an ambient hdri. If you know the colour temperature of your spots, then use that colour info in your spotlight setup within layout. It's all down to experimentation. Or, take an ambient hdri and a spotlit hdri, then use a mix of the two to see what works :)


Other techs say that in the tube camera (video) days it was terrible to have direct light into the lense, but with chip cameras there should be no burn.
Yes. Chip cameras should be OK. Back in the late 80's I filmed a local charity fashion gig, I left someone in charge of the camera and told him 'NOT to leave the camera pointing at the stage (lots of spots) but to keep it moving. I came back five minutes later, He'd gone to the bar and left the camera :2guns:. I was just setting up my video business at the time, the camera was at Canon for repair for THREE MONTHS. I still have the mental scars :bangwall:


Or, is it even simpler to just enable "Interpolated" radiosity, map the sampled "real world lights" hdri to a flat plane object(s), and use it for the light with the scene's light set to 0 and the scene ambiance set to 100%?
I'm guessing the flat plane would be your ceiling? I've never tried it. Again, it really depends on your scene and what it is you're trying to achieve. I've never had any success trying to fake indoor lighting with an hdri, I'm certainly not saying it can't be done, it's just I haven't invested enough time to get the desired results.

Here's something I've been having a quick play with, don't know if it's any help but it does use hdri for the light coming in through the window, it also uses 4 lightwave spotlights for the recessed ceiling lights. It was just an experiment with an old 9.0 scene made with lwcad 1.5, thought I'd give it the 9.2 treatment. It uses cached FG interpolated at 3 bounces.

(was about to post these in the 9.2 gallery, but I got to your post first :) )

McFilms
04-06-2007, 01:10 PM
To all: I know everyone is busy, so don't worry if you are not able to answer straight away. The fact anyone is "willing to answer any questions" is far more important to me than "when they have an opportunity to answer".

Like the old saying goes, "Don't sweat the petty things, and don't pet the sweaty things..."


T-Light: Cool renders, T-Light! I don't know how anyone could get their renders any more real looking than that! Wow!

re: hdri

The plan (currently) is to:

"Real World"
Do HDRIs for all lights used, then I plan to set a distance and photograph a 18% gray card (not 10%, as I had thought before) matched to each light sampled. I'll also do as we do on the set, photograph the gray card while the light is diffused by a half f-stop, and then repeat the process while the light is diffused by a whole f-stop.

"Digital World"
In Lightwave, use the HDRI on a spotlight, surface a plane with 18% gray, render, and use Photoshop to compare the render of the "digital gray card" to the digital photo of the "real world 18% gray card". Once I get a match on all settings I can create a scene file with the presets to be used on any renders.


Still another idea, which would take as much time as my process (for me. other could probably buzz through it quickly.), I wonder how difficult it would be to simply make a plugin we could all affectionately refer to as "Light Meter". I do not know programming, or I might have a go at it. I believe it would solve many problems, especially if you could also measure color temperature. In the "real world", color temperature could be measured using Pantone's hand held color sampling device while pointed at a light (at least I assume so, since I don't have one yet). Light measurement by footcandles or exposure values (EV is used on my Gossen meter), color sampling via Pantone, and all combined to apply in the CG scene.

If anyone is wondering "Why does he want to do this?":

Most of the CG stuff I do now is providing VFX on simple "low-to-no budget" projects. Data can be collected on the physical locations of lights and entered properly in LW. On most of the projects, time is a luxury no one can afford. Render times must be cut down, yet still match the digital objects/vfx/stuff lighting to the set's lights. The end result can be seamless if matched properly, and I believe that proper lighting is the answer.