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jasonwestmas
03-12-2007, 01:12 PM
Anyone still using Panther? I guess I should just flesh out my $130 and get the tiger for Mac UB. Panther works well however, at least in my experience.

eblu
03-12-2007, 01:16 PM
umm... the tiger boat is about to be obsolete. why not just skip it altogether and get leopard (coming this spring!... er... sometime)

jasonwestmas
03-12-2007, 01:16 PM
Righton!

mlinde
03-14-2007, 04:54 PM
Anyone still using Panther? I guess I should just flesh out my $130 and get the tiger for Mac UB. Panther works well however, at least in my experience.
You also can't buy a UB of Tiger, just PPC. All Intel-core machines shipped with a version of Tiger, so Apple doesn't sell a boxed UB (except for Server 10.4.7 or later)

jasonwestmas
03-14-2007, 05:16 PM
Thanks mlinde. So will the Leopard have a boxed upgrade with the UB for my Dual 1GHZ PPC?

BazC
03-14-2007, 05:39 PM
Thanks mlinde. So will the Leopard have a boxed upgrade with the UB for my Dual 1GHZ PPC?

Do Apple do upgrades? I thought it was all ne price.

jasonwestmas
03-14-2007, 06:03 PM
yes you are correct Baz. Apple calls it an upgrade but really you are just paying full price lol.

ingo
03-15-2007, 03:07 AM
I am still on 10.3 too, no need for an upgrade since all works fine and no new features in 10.4 to make me want to buy it. I only go for new OSes when i got it with a new Mac. BTW, OS 9.2 works well natively on my G4/450 for modelling, man is that system easy and fast ;)

gatz
03-15-2007, 04:25 AM
Apple's is going to hold on to "10" as long as possible. Hence the .1 gouge. Still, the upgrade from 10.3 to 10.4 was note worthy. The system became more responsive, OGL is faster and widgets (some) are cool. Spotlight is a pox though.

BazC
03-15-2007, 04:37 AM
yes you are correct Baz. Apple calls it an upgrade but really you are just paying full price lol.

LOL, well it's still a bargain, have you seen the price of Vista!?

Phil
03-15-2007, 05:44 AM
Technically, it is always an upgrade because you got the full version with your machine and the license price was included. You cannot buy a non-upgrade version of OS X because you cannot buy a Mac without OS X.

I'm curious to see how OS X full version upgrades are implemented - Leopard will be my first opportunity: as a new Mac user, I've never had to do it before. Coming from Windows, where one backed everything up and either installed a dedicated new harddrive or blew the old install away before upgrading, I'm hoping things are less....time consuming.

BazC
03-15-2007, 05:53 AM
[QUOTE=PhilI'm curious to see how OS X full version upgrades are implemented - Leopard will be my first opportunity: as a new Mac user, I've never had to do it before. Coming from Windows, where one backed everything up and either installed a dedicated new harddrive or blew the old install away before upgrading, I'm hoping things are less....time consuming.[/QUOTE]

It's painless and fast I can assure you! :D

mlinde
03-15-2007, 08:16 AM
Couple of things going on here - so a short set of answers
1) It would seem likely that Apple would make a UB install DVD in the Leopard box, much like it does with the current 10.4.7 Server. That disk would install on all the machines Leopard will support (assuming they have a DVD drive). I say DVD because Tiger shipped with DVD only, and you had to special order replacement CDs from Apple directly.

2) Apple provides a lot of free upgrades between paid releases. Both 10.3 and now 10.4 had significant upgrades up to 10.x.9 - along with security updates and application updates. At some point the addition of new features becomes a paid upgrade, just like with an application. With the price having been steady at $129 for each of the major upgrades, it is a lot less pricey than Vista (although if you keep up, it's $129 every 1.5 - 2 years)

3) The upgrade path is usually painless, although there is always someone with a problem. I've always recommended a full backup to a secondary HD, then run an "archive and install" which technically isn't an upgrade, but a reinstall without erasing your data. Still gets you to the current OS, but without any leftovers from the last one.