PDA

View Full Version : Total Lunar Eclipse



Matt
03-03-2007, 02:26 PM
Anyone watching this tonight? At 10:44pm GMT the Moon will be aligned with the Earth and Sun, causing a total lunar eclipse.

We have a full moon and cloudless sky here, I'll post some photos if they come out well enough!

:)

borkus
03-03-2007, 02:43 PM
thanks matt. haven't had a break in the clouds since 10 this morning. and doesn't look they'll let up until late tomorrow, if that. so i'll have to use the old internet to see this one. hope your picks come out good!!!

vashts
03-03-2007, 02:57 PM
me! here in italy we are at.. 1/3 now.. :thumbsup:

vashts

Matt
03-03-2007, 03:04 PM
About halfway here now!

Matt
03-03-2007, 03:08 PM
Wish I had a decent camera with a huge zoom on it! I don't think my crappy IXUS 400 will cut it!!!

DogBoy
03-03-2007, 04:03 PM
Wow, thats cool! It's just a dull orange.

:D

KillMe
03-03-2007, 04:12 PM
just come in from watching it - its in total ecilpse now - watched it as it came upto it so dont think i'll bother waiting for it to come out the otherside

cool though - shame cant take a pic of it though =/ - need a long exposure and proballya tripod rigged to track the moons movement or it would streak

anyway cool stuff

tribbles
03-03-2007, 04:16 PM
http://www.tribbeck.com/misc/DSCF2368resaved.JPG is the last picture I was able to take - unfortunately, there's a bit of camera shake (I'm using an old Fuji Finepix S5000; have been meaning to buy a new camera though).

Silkrooster
03-03-2007, 04:52 PM
Call me stupid, but what on earth is the difference between a new moon and a lunar eclipse?
Silk

tribbles
03-03-2007, 05:01 PM
A new moon is when the moon is between the earth and the sun, so the sun's rays are on the bit of the moon we can't see.

A lunar eclipse is when the earth is between the moon and the sun, where the earth blocks the sun's rays. Lunar eclipses only happen when it's a full moon.

KillMe
03-03-2007, 05:12 PM
hey thats not a bad pic - i didn't think just a ordinary camera would take a good photo so i didn't evne bother trying =/ - ah well lession learn for what the next one comes along ( probally in about 20 years or so )

tribbles
03-03-2007, 05:19 PM
I didn't think it'd come out either - but if you don't try...

Next one on Western Europe's in February 2008, so not long to wait. Problem is it'll be 03:00 GMT...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6411991.stm

KillMe
03-03-2007, 05:30 PM
also almsot certainly be cloudy in scotland =)

cagey5
03-03-2007, 05:42 PM
Nice capture. Just in from the pub when it's about half way back out. I managed to catch it at full eclipse though with a pint of Landlord in my hand. Wish I had taken some pics now. It's rare we get such a clear night.

borkus
03-03-2007, 06:13 PM
can see why this astonished and amazed people in medieval and earlier times. it still amazes us now and we know exactly the why's and how comes. imagine seeing this from the stand point of not knowing why that weird gray thing in the sky suddenly disappeared or got a impressive halo around it.

Lamont
03-04-2007, 02:09 AM
Those of us on the West coast of the US missed out.

Roly
03-04-2007, 04:16 PM
just come in from watching it - its in total ecilpse now - watched it as it came upto it so dont think i'll bother waiting for it to come out the otherside

cool though - shame cant take a pic of it though =/ - need a long exposure and proballya tripod rigged to track the moons movement or it would streak

anyway cool stuff


It's all I've was able to capture. I went out too late. May be next time. I use my Nikon D70 with a 17-300mm lens. You'll need a tripod specially with long focal length but not the long exposure. Plenty of light on the moon for the picture. Just use more sensitivity on film or in this case dial up the ISO settings. Trailing is more apparent with the stars when using unguided exposures or long focal length.


Pentium IV 3.4Ghz, 2GB of RAM, ATI FireGL V7100, Windows XP Pro ( 32 bit ) SP2, Lightwave OB14.

Silkrooster
03-04-2007, 04:48 PM
Excellent image, I love how close you were able to get. I tried once few years ago with my Canon G3. Nice but small. I think the max zoom for the lens was about 140mm.
Silk

colkai
03-05-2007, 03:28 AM
I remember doing a pic of the moon way way back usign a 300mm lens with a matched 3X converter, it did give me a buzz, even if the clarity wasn't so good as I didn't have a tripod so just leant on my mums back wall :)

starbase1
03-05-2007, 05:31 AM
I used to do a lot of astro photography back in film and chemical days, a real pain! Maybe I should give it another go.

Getting the ophots printed was the real adventure, the number of places that could not cope with almost completely black frames... In the end I found 2 solutions that worked well.

1. Go to an expensive professional outfit where they would actually listen.

2. Go to one of those dead cheap 30 minute photo places where you couldd actuallty talk to the guy who would print them!

Incidentally, if someone wants to get a bit more ambitious, I suggest trying for the first quarter moon, (half lit), when you will get tons of crater detail.

The easiest way to get photos through a telescope (or binoculars come to that), is the afocal technique. Focus the bins or scope at infinity, (this tends to happen naturally when you focus by eye if your eyes are reasonably normal), then point your digital camera down the eyepiece, default zoom, without touching it. Use a landscape or panorama setting so the camera will also focus on infinity, and won't try and use a flash. It may take a few goes, but these days you can see the results instantly.

In a bad run with film I could get through several rolls with barely one usable shot if I was going for deep sky stuff. Mind you it was fiun explaining to the conventional types that you used a 3 minute exposure, focal length 12 metres, f48...

Nick

Iain
03-05-2007, 07:17 AM
I could see it perfectly in Edinburgh. Bit distracted though as I was trying to pour my wife into the car after a dinner party at a friend's. Something 'disagreed' with her.

Always find these occasions a bit humbling though. Makes you remember how small a part we play in everything.

Matt
03-05-2007, 07:32 AM
... pour my wife into the car

LOL! I can just soooo see that! :)

My photos are a bit crap to be honest, despite using a tripod, and setting the focus to infinity, my IXUS 400 just couldn't figure out what the hell I was trying to photograph!

<-- Needs an SLR camera!

Silkrooster
03-05-2007, 04:40 PM
I used to do a lot of astro photography back in film and chemical days, a real pain! Maybe I should give it another go.

Getting the ophots printed was the real adventure, the number of places that could not cope with almost completely black frames... In the end I found 2 solutions that worked well.

1. Go to an expensive professional outfit where they would actually listen.

2. Go to one of those dead cheap 30 minute photo places where you couldd actuallty talk to the guy who would print them!

Incidentally, if someone wants to get a bit more ambitious, I suggest trying for the first quarter moon, (half lit), when you will get tons of crater detail.

The easiest way to get photos through a telescope (or binoculars come to that), is the afocal technique. Focus the bins or scope at infinity, (this tends to happen naturally when you focus by eye if your eyes are reasonably normal), then point your digital camera down the eyepiece, default zoom, without touching it. Use a landscape or panorama setting so the camera will also focus on infinity, and won't try and use a flash. It may take a few goes, but these days you can see the results instantly.

In a bad run with film I could get through several rolls with barely one usable shot if I was going for deep sky stuff. Mind you it was fiun explaining to the conventional types that you used a 3 minute exposure, focal length 12 metres, f48...

Nick
Hmmm. I should give that a try sometime. I have a small scope, I don't recall the power, but maybe I could get something out of it.:hey:
Silk