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Cesar Montero
01-15-2007, 02:55 PM
Hi there!
This is my 2006 demo-reel.
I am looking for a full-time job.
My main skills are lighting/texturing in LW 3D.
Please take a look and let me know what you think.


Flash Video, best quality (10 Mb):
http://archeidos.com/demo_reel/demo_reel.html

Quicktime, medium quality (10 Mb):
http://archeidos.com/demo_reel/demo_reel_cesar_montero.mov

Resume (PDF):
http://archeidos.com/demo_reel/Resume_Cesar_Montero.pdf

alifx
01-15-2007, 03:29 PM
yesterday I was thinking after I saw your last work on CGTalk, I was thinking of why didn't Cesar have a demo reel of these works, and today I'm surprised believe me I'm very surprised that I see you made a demo reel.
maybe it was a wish yesterday hehe

anyway, the demo is fantastic good job Cesar

Cesar Montero
01-15-2007, 05:52 PM
yesterday I was thinking after I saw your last work on CGTalk, I was thinking of why didn't Cesar have a demo reel of these works, and today I'm surprised believe me I'm very surprised that I see you made a demo reel.
maybe it was a wish yesterday hehe

anyway, the demo is fantastic good job Cesar

I realized until last week that I didn't had a demo-reel :bangwall:
So I did this demo-reel this morning.
Thanks for the support! :thumbsup:

MooseDog
01-15-2007, 09:24 PM
two words: purr-fect :)

Nicolas Jordan
01-15-2007, 11:04 PM
Very nice reel Cesar! I like the camera moves on the stills and it's nice to see all your animation work first. A good demo reel is always the key to landing a good job. I would be surprised if you don't get several job offers! :thumbsup:

adrian
01-16-2007, 02:55 AM
Very good work. :)

I was not able to play the .qt version however (said it needed more software that wasn't available on the quicktime server).

kilvano
01-16-2007, 02:57 AM
Great showreel.

I would run a spell checker over your CV thought.

Spelling mistakes like "LigthWave" corp up..

Apart from that...amazing work

oDDity
01-16-2007, 03:03 AM
Well it's nice and all, but it's doesn't show a very broad repertoire. It's basically all studio ligghting conditions and surfaces limited to metal, plastic and glass.
That stuff's pretty basic.
That embryo was not a good example of sss.

colkai
01-16-2007, 03:31 AM
Hi Cesar,
Nice range of modelling and surfacing techniques, plus lighting and texturing, makes a change from seeing work by people that isn't textured or animated.

Of course, lighting is as I'd expect from your good self. ;)

oDDity
01-16-2007, 06:54 AM
Yes, the studio lighting he has shown is good, but I'm saying that if he seriously wants a job as a lighting tech/artist, then he needs to show a lot more variety of conditions and subjects than product shot studio setups.

Cesar Montero
01-16-2007, 12:08 PM
MooseDog:
Thanks, I'm glad you like it

nj3Design:
I allready had some during this year. I realized I didn't had a demo-reel last week. So I decided to do it and make my job search official.Thanks for the support!

adrian:
Its a new format from Quicktime. I'll make a Sorensor version. Thanks for reminding me about this!

Kilvano:
Thanks for revising my CV! I'll give it a check. I'm receiving such great feedback from this. Thanks!

oDDity:
Thanks for your comments, I'll put them into practice to improve my demo-reel. I personally want to get into other light scenarios as you mentioned. I consider them easy to make, but it is true that I don't have any in there! I always forget the easy parts! Thanks for the reminder.

colkai:
Thanks! My modeling is a bit basic, and lighting is better. It just never feels its good enought, but seems that feeling like that is something common? That was the reason I didn't had a demo-reel: I felt it was still not enought. But then you realize people that know less get hired...so well, its worth doing one I guess

colkai
01-17-2007, 03:38 AM
colkai:
Thanks! My modeling is a bit basic, and lighting is better. It just never feels its good enought, but seems that feeling like that is something common? That was the reason I didn't had a demo-reel: I felt it was still not enought. But then you realize people that know less get hired...so well, its worth doing one I guess

Just so, just so, one can be obsessive about form and detail and lighting etc, but when you look at the number of TV shows and adverts done on a tight budget and schedule, the key thing is to get the work done, reliably, consistently and in a team spirit. I doubt there are many folks who do 'day job' work who don't think the work could have been better with more time/money.

My boss has a saying, if it works, it's good code. When you get something out the door by end of day, you can't afford to be picky, 'cause that do not pay the bills. ;)

Cesar Montero
01-17-2007, 05:25 PM
Just so, just so, one can be obsessive about form and detail and lighting etc, but when you look at the number of TV shows and adverts done on a tight budget and schedule, the key thing is to get the work done, reliably, consistently and in a team spirit. I doubt there are many folks who do 'day job' work who don't think the work could have been better with more time/money.

My boss has a saying, if it works, it's good code. When you get something out the door by end of day, you can't afford to be picky, 'cause that do not pay the bills. ;)

Yes I understand.

I was doubting being good enought to work at a company, and therefore I didn't do a demo-reel before. Then I realized my skills where allready good enought, but I was so concerned about improving that I forgot to make a demo-reel. Sounds silly, but that is what happened, and I wanted to share what happened :thumbsup:

newsvixen8
01-17-2007, 06:28 PM
All I can say is, if talent like yours goes unnoticed, then there's no hope for any of us. Thanks for the months of inspiration, by the way.

Cesar Montero
01-17-2007, 07:08 PM
All I can say is, if talent like yours goes unnoticed, then there's no hope for any of us. Thanks for the months of inspiration, by the way.

My main problem is the cost of legal tramits required to get me hired. For someone to invest in me, he has to realize he can't find the talent I have inside his country. Then he would have the necessity to import someone, as me. For me being the best is not an option, it is a requirement. Add on top of that my desire to work at film/commercial work. Then I need to be really good. Therefore I'm always in the search of improvement. :thumbsup:

One thing that does helps is that I have a title of computer engineering, design diploma at vfs, plus a good resume and curriculum. That allows the visa tramit to be more a cost than a risk.

dxyner
01-18-2007, 12:53 AM
This looks excellent! You have a lot of serious skill.

bobakabob
01-18-2007, 04:57 AM
Cesar,

Your renders always have a sheen to them which ooze professionalism. The texturing and lighting are convincingly photoreal - no mean achievement.

McFilms
01-18-2007, 07:30 AM
Great stuff!

Also, in response to posts and all:
No matter what, I believe that any good art director "worth his/her salt" could find work that could be done by anyone who bothers to post within any of these CG galleries. Art and the "commercial world" has proven that there are many clients, with many needs, for many looks, that must be accomplished by many artists. There is a place for us all. Some might be paid more, and some might have to work harder than others. This is the way of the world, and has been since someone first said, "Say, I'll give you two pretty shells if you'll do a mural in my cave..."

Rant complete. Please rewind, and play again.

serge
01-18-2007, 12:53 PM
Cesar, I have a few comments.

You say you want to be hired as a texturing and lighting artist. If studio's are looking for metal and glass specialists they might be interested, but I doubt many are. You have to be far more versatile. Show some great organised UV-maps, textures of human and animal skin, vegetation, landscapes, architectural objects, etc.
As for lighting, I agree with Oddity. You need to show more scenes under very different lighting conditions.

As for the current demoreel, I'd skip everything except the lightbulb animation. I have seen your threads on the diamonds, and I know it wasn't easy and you put great effort in that. However, I believe many people here are able to make good looking diamonds after reading those threads, and doing some tutorials. Same goes for the perfume bottle and others. As for the chicken, the balloon scene, the fish bowl, these are cute and well executed, but I don't think they are demoreel material, and do justice to your skills.

An example: I think many people here did the Jack Daniels tutorial (http://www.liquid-arts.de/techniques.htm). The end result of the tutorial looks really cool, but of course one should never put it in his/her demoreel. With the right tutorial anyone is able to create good looking bottles, glasses, icecubes and all, so it's nothing special. If however you're able to convincingly pour the Jack Daniels into a glass with icecubes, then you'll have good demoreel material. What I'm saying is, you have above average talent and devotion, but except for the lightbulb animation I can't see it in your demoreel.

The lightbulb animation is great, I've seen the whole animation. All aspects are well executed, from story and directing to lighting, texturing, animation and render. And therefor you have an exceptional piece, which should attract the curiosity of studio's. It even got the CGTalk frontpage, which might be one of the best advertisements you can get. So, if I were you I'd let the lightbulb animation be my demoreel for now, and start working on something similar to draw more attention. Again, if you consider yourself a texturing and lighting specialist I believe you'll need to show much more different textures and lighting scenes than your current demoreel.

Cesar Montero
01-18-2007, 03:18 PM
I believe many people here are able to make good looking diamonds after reading those threads, and doing some tutorials.

Well, many people can do many things. But how many people can produce the same quality over and over again? That is what makes my demo-reel special: there is a consistency in the quality, regardless the theme or object being portraited.

The lightbulb animation is in fact my best piece due to many reasons. However, putting only that in a demo-reel wouldn't show the variety of work I can produce. It is the whole that matters.



. Show some great organised UV-maps, textures of human and animal skin, vegetation, landscapes, architectural objects, etc.
As for lighting, I agree with Oddity. You need to show more scenes under very different lighting conditions.

Yup, I agree that I can increase the value of my demo-reel by adding more lighting situations. Its not that difficult, I do it for my client work, I just have to finish their projects to be able to put it inside my demo-reel. I do agree that I could increase the value of the demo-reel by putting more lighting scenarios. :thumbsup:



An example: I think many people here did the Jack Daniels tutorial (http://www.liquid-arts.de/techniques.htm). The end result of the tutorial looks really cool, but of course one should never put it in his/her demoreel.

You can portrait reflective surfaces with the use of HDRI. There are plenty of tutorials showing that type of lighting. A keen eye will realize that my renders inside my demo-reel are done without HDRI. In other situations, they first ask how the reflections where created. Not many people know how to create good looking reflections without the use of HDRI and/or GI. I do, and that is worth in putting in a demo-reel, or being showcased and selected by Jeremy Birn at Pixar, or being set as quality standard by Nicholas BOughen from Rainmaker. So I guess it is good enought to be at a demo-reel.
:)

Cesar Montero
01-18-2007, 03:24 PM
Great stuff! ....There is a place for us all....This is the way of the world, and has been since someone first said, "Say, I'll give you two pretty shells if you'll do a mural in my cave..."


Very nice insight! I enjoyed it, and actually played it again as you suggested.

Cesar Montero
01-18-2007, 03:27 PM
This looks excellent! You have a lot of serious skill.
Thanks, small comments as your always keep me pushing in hard times. I appreciate it :thumbsup:


Cesar,

Your renders always have a sheen to them which ooze professionalism. The texturing and lighting are convincingly photoreal - no mean achievement.
Yeah, it is good to know I got the my lighting skills at a good level. Knowing how to use the tool is just the beginning of more exciting work. :thumbsup:

serge
01-18-2007, 07:51 PM
.....The lightbulb animation is in fact my best piece due to many reasons. However, putting only that in a demo-reel wouldn't show the variety of work I can produce. It is the whole that matters.....
Yes it's the whole that matters, and that's exactly why I believe that the lightbulb animation as a whole will attract more attention than your current demoreel. I'm not saying that it should become your demoreel, but until you have a bigger variety of exceptional work I'd use only that piece to attract the curiosity of the viewer. If they are interested they'll check your website and find more of your work there.


.....You can portrait reflective surfaces with the use of HDRI. There are plenty of tutorials showing that type of lighting. A keen eye will realize that my renders inside my demo-reel are done without HDRI. In other situations, they first ask how the reflections where created. Not many people know how to create good looking reflections without the use of HDRI and/or GI. I do, and that is worth in putting in a demo-reel, or being showcased and selected by Jeremy Birn at Pixar, or being set as quality standard by Nicholas BOughen from Rainmaker. So I guess it is good enought to be at a demo-reel.
:)
What were the conditions under which Jeremy Birn and Nicholas Boughen have seen your work? Did they have a quick glance and immediately saw your talent, or did they have the time to study it? Looking carefully at your renders, a "keen eye", as you put it, might see your talent in lighting, sure. But I believe it's much more important for a demoreel to be very attractive "at first glance". I'm sure at least 90% of all demoreels out there are dismissed at first glance. You will want yours to be with the last 10%.

I really like your work and admire your devotion. You deserve have a great demoreel. :)

Cesar Montero
01-18-2007, 09:39 PM
Serge:

I'll take your feedback and try to improve in the points you mention.
Sometimes it takes me a while to understand points from comments.
I think I do understand now your point.
Thanks for the interest!:thumbsup:

Stooch
01-19-2007, 06:11 AM
i think your pieces look great you just need to avoid using still pans in a demo reel! if all you have is stills then a gallery format is better then a reel. If you want to show off your items that are not animated, atleast take the time to render some camera moves or turn tables because there are alot of little nuances that you capture with an image sequence. the fresnel, the glint of surfaces, lighting, all change dynamically as you alter the camera, something a still cannot capture! your reel itself is only half the package, the other half is presentation and pacing and making sure that you arent dragging on for too long. aim for a short and sweet, about 1:30 to 2 minutes max.

Extent
01-21-2007, 09:48 PM
You need to make sure that all of your video for web distro is deinterlaced too. I found that quite distracting personally.

Cesar Montero
01-21-2007, 11:25 PM
You need to make sure that all of your video for web distro is deinterlaced too. I found that quite distracting personally.

That is a mayor flaw, thanks for noticing it!:thumbsup: