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View Full Version : Dongle security within a school. How?



Gui Lo
11-12-2006, 12:35 AM
Hi,
We have a educational pack of 5 licenses and so we have 5 dongles to attach. I do not want to keep inserting, then collecting and keeping the dongles each time a student wants to use LW.

Can anyone suggest a way to secure the hardware dongles so that they cannot be taken away from the machines?

Thanks in advance for any help.

Gui Lo

cagey5
11-12-2006, 02:14 AM
If the USB ports are not fixed to the Motherboard then how about removing the USB port from its slot at the back of the computer and having it loose inside the body of the computer with the dongle attached.

Lito
11-12-2006, 08:21 AM
Like cagey 5 suggested it would probably be best kept inside the computer. Most computer motherboards today have internal USB ports that are disabled and come with and external face plate. If you plug those in and enable it in the bios then use some double sided tape to stick it to a part of the case it would make it very hard to steal the dongle. Also, if the motherboard only has external USB slots, you could so something similar by sticking the dongle to the case internally and running a USB extension cable into the case.

kilvano
11-13-2006, 06:12 AM
My old uni just had a 6inch USB extension cable from a USB in back going inside one of the expansion slots in the back. They had it secured to the inside of the case using bolt of some description but i know people tried to get them and they couldnt.

ALL modern mobos come with connections for further usb slots (like if you get a case with a USB slot in the front, it plugs into those pins). It prob would be easy to rig something together.

Limbus
11-13-2006, 07:48 AM
If the USB ports are not fixed to the Motherboard then how about removing the USB port from its slot at the back of the computer and having it loose inside the body of the computer with the dongle attached.

Thats how I did this. Also the Computers where secured with a special screw, locked and screwed to the tables.

Florian

Exception
11-13-2006, 01:49 PM
Newtek is working on a network dongle, but you need to ask them about how long it will be until it is realeased.

Limbus
11-14-2006, 01:00 AM
Newtek is working on a network dongle, but you need to ask them about how long it will be until it is realeased.

I really think that NewTek should drop the Hardware Dongle and use either some kind of Software Dongle or a Key / Registration Combo.

- Dongle protected Software is still cracked. It does not seem to offer any extra protection
- with the new pricing of LW it makes even less sense to use a dongle.
- Providing Support for Dongle related problems costs a lot of money.

Florian

Andyjaggy
11-14-2006, 11:33 AM
I would go with the USB port inside the computer, assuming you have one of coarse. I used to hate the dongle and wondered why Newtek still used it but I have changed my mind since then. Having the dongle lets me install Lightwave on my desktop, my laptop, and a computer at school, and use whatever one I need as long as I have my dongle with me! Just don't loose it :)

Sarford
11-17-2006, 06:51 PM
I really think that NewTek should drop the Hardware Dongle and use either some kind of Software Dongle or a Key / Registration Combo.

- Dongle protected Software is still cracked. It does not seem to offer any extra protection
- with the new pricing of LW it makes even less sense to use a dongle.
- Providing Support for Dongle related problems costs a lot of money.

Florian

Wich is fine if you work on a single computer. I for instance use Lightwave on 5 different computers, the dongle is a great solution for me. I sure do hope they stick to it.

Exception
11-17-2006, 07:03 PM
I really think that NewTek should drop the Hardware Dongle and use either some kind of Software Dongle or a Key / Registration Combo.

- Dongle protected Software is still cracked. It does not seem to offer any extra protection
- with the new pricing of LW it makes even less sense to use a dongle.
- Providing Support for Dongle related problems costs a lot of money.

Florian

The software protections are also cracked. Everything gets cracked.
The issue is that the dongle is not so much for anti piracy by individuals, but for companies, for whom it is often quite tempting to just install a second copy somewhere if they need it for a while, thinking they'll buy a copy when they get around to it, but then forget. And similar issues.
A dongle allows users to switch seats, the whole office to have it installed, but only three dongles, and then people can use one when they need it.

I like the dongle too. Don't forget, it's purple.

At least, mine is. Red's fancy too.

Silkrooster
11-17-2006, 09:56 PM
Here's an idea whether it would work or not I guess that up to you. For those 5 computers attach a usb extention cord and run it into a secured room, then plug the dongles into the cords. I am sure the electricians could add a usb connector on each side of the wall if necessary.
Silk

SP00
11-18-2006, 06:46 AM
They should have a Wifi/USB Dongle. That way, I don't have to plug anything in. I just have to be in range of a Wifi port. And in cases were there are not Wifi, I can just use the USB port. I"ll be happy with almost any solution as along as I get to run it on my desktop or laptop. Obviously, it shouldn't have to log into a database to check for a key, otherwise, my laptop will be useless in areas without a Wifi or Ethernet connection. That would suck with taking my work on the road.

MysteryMonkey
11-18-2006, 08:06 AM
I wouldn't ever want to unhook the USB port and dangle it back into the computer case. Extra long USB cables running into a secured room seem somewhat impracticable too. . . . All of the computers in my lab (G5s) are secured by a cable and padlock fastened to the security loop on the case. To secure the dongles we are planning on buying some thin aircraft cable, running it through the hole on the end of the dongle and permanently "crimping" a loop. Then on the other end of the cable making another loop and putting that into the lock. The cable and crimping materials and tools can probably be found at a good old "regular" hardware store.

Extent
11-18-2006, 03:44 PM
If you're only worried about casual theft then that would work well, and would make it easier to maintain your licenses in the future, but if you have any students who might "really want" a dongle and happen to have a pair of tin snips you can kiss it goodbuy. At least having it in the case makes it take a lot longer to get to and gives a lot more time for some kind of supervision to notice. (and just because you put it inside dosen't mean you have to dangle anything :p )

Bytehawk
11-18-2006, 04:17 PM
why don't you install the dongles inside the pc cases ?

it's perfectly possible. And as you said, the cases are already well protected.

GregMalick
11-18-2006, 04:56 PM
why don't you install the dongles inside the pc cases ?

it's perfectly possible. And as you said, the cases are already well protected.
That's a good idea.
Chances are , the students wouldn't even be aware of a security device.

Personally I like the hardware piracy protection.
I only wish they gave me two - One for my laptop, one for my desktop PC.
Then I wouldn't be paranoid about losing one.

MysteryMonkey
11-18-2006, 09:58 PM
If you're only worried about casual theft then that would work well, and would make it easier to maintain your licenses in the future, but if you have any students who might "really want" a dongle and happen to have a pair of tin snips you can kiss it goodbuy....)

Good cable doesn't cut very easily with tin snips. With most cutters you would have to gnaw through the strands of cable. Yes it can be done, but it isn't a simple snip and your done kind of process. I'm always looking for better ways to solve this kind of problem and going inside the case might work as long the USB port isn't needed for a Hub.

Limbus
11-20-2006, 02:59 AM
The software protections are also cracked. Everything gets cracked.

Exactly my point. But with software protection there is no extra hardware that costzs money.


The issue is that the dongle is not so much for anti piracy by individuals, but for companies, for whom it is often quite tempting to just install a second copy somewhere if they need it for a while, thinking they'll buy a copy when they get around to it, but then forget. And similar issues.

I dont know many compnays who really like dongles because they get stolen by employees and tend to break near the end of a project.


A dongle allows users to switch seats, the whole office to have it installed, but only three dongles, and then people can use one when they need it.
I would prefer a floating license for that kind of thing.

Gui Lo
11-20-2006, 04:17 AM
Thanks for all the suggestions.

A very good idea but I cannot put them inside the case because the I use 2 classrooms to teach 3d and it would mean opening the cases up every couple of days.

A server dongle would be a great idea or even the option to choose an internet dongle so that the machine must be connected to NewTek in order to use LW fully.

Multiple dongles are a big hassle.

Thanks
Gui Lo

Iaian7
11-20-2006, 10:40 AM
Hmm, I can definitely see where the dongle can be a pain. Some situations really don't lend themselves to USB keys, but I'm not sure server side works any better. Granted, my only (really horrible) experience with server based licensing was with Quark. Thankfully, that's long past!

Since I don't have to deal with multiple dongles (well, save for work vs. home dongles, my personal one having plugins attached to it as well), I rather enjoy it. It's made life a LOT easier, since I can install and use Lightwave on any computer I'm around at the time. Plus here at work we've changed Lightwave seats around, and the USB dongles made the transition absolutely painless. On a personal level, I really hope Newtek sticks with the dongle. For cases like above, perhaps they can use a secondary type of security implementation?