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View Full Version : Can Lightwave utilise the new Intel Core 2 Quadro processor?



peter66
11-09-2006, 04:49 AM
I've just been looking at the benchmarks for this processor at http://www.tomshardware.com/2006/11/02/kentsfield_released/ and it looks like a big advancement for people who use photoshop, premiere and studio max... so my easy yes - no question is this: will lightwave users see a similar (massive) rendering speed improvement?

Cheers
Pete

BeeVee
11-09-2006, 04:57 AM
Yes. But... as always, but. Small scenes will not see as much of a rendering speedup as ones that take a long time to render, as is always the way.

B

peter66
11-09-2006, 05:26 AM
Yes.
Cool! Thanks for the quick response.

Matt
11-09-2006, 05:39 AM
Wonder how much these will be? (In UKP) None of the UK dealers are telling!

StereoMike
11-09-2006, 05:39 AM
You'll see big speed improvements when doing animations and using screamernet (or render managers like harpoon), cause each of your cores will render frames all the time contrary to the 4-thread single-instance approach, where 3 of the 4 cores are idle during certain rendering tasks.

Mike

peter66
11-09-2006, 05:58 AM
Wonder how much these will be? (In UKP) None of the UK dealers are telling!If the prices over there are anything like in NZ, it'll be about 696 excluding V.A.T. (or 817.80 inclusive).

We can pre-order them here in NZ for $1999 excluding GST (or $2248.88 inclusive)... quite hard to justify using the price of an entire computer system and monitor on one processor, but still -> it'd be nice :)


You'll see big speed improvements when doing animations and using screamernet (or render managers like harpoon)
Do you mean you'd use screamernet to render on just one machine? Are we going back to saying that Lightwave wouldn't utilise all 4 cores in ordinary rendering situations?

StereoMike
11-09-2006, 06:49 AM
That's not a LW problem. Certain tasks can't be multi threaded (yet?). So for intense scenes you use much of the power of your 4 cores, cause hardcore rendering is well multithreaded. But many of the other little processes have to be worked through in one go, so only 1 of the 4 cores will approach it while the others go idle. That's the same as in other packages.
Therefore the impact on rendering speed increases with the share of rendering involved, that's why small scenes with much setup work in proportion to the plain rendering will gain only little.

And starting 4 instances of lw (or better: using a render manager) will give you 4 times the speed of a single core machine no matter how complex or simple a scene is. Cause _everything_ is now obviously multithreaded :)

Mike

StereoMike
11-09-2006, 06:52 AM
(at the cost of more RAM I should add)

lots
11-09-2006, 11:38 AM
Doubling the processors is never a 2x thing. There is the cost of overhead to manage the processors and extra threads, hence you usually see a 1.8x speed increase at best. This increase is further reduced depending on the type of computation, as some computations lend them selves well to multi CPUs and others dont. This is a problem across the board for any multi CPU oriented piece of software, and is a problem that is being very much worked on in the programming industry at all levels at this point in time. Mostly due to the push from CPU makers towards thread parallelism.

To answer the initial question though, Lightwave supports up to 16 threads at once. This means that you get one thread per core. Since Core 2 Quadro is a 4 core CPU, Lightwave can handle it. If you had 4 of these CPUs (say in a Xeon setup) then you'd have the maximum threads that LW supported. To get more you'd need to use a render farm type setup, but on a single machine. Then like mentioned earlier, you'd see a speed boost when rendering animations (and stills if the render manager supports it)

StereoMike
11-09-2006, 02:19 PM
you will get a speed boost for animation even with just two cores, if you start two instances instead of one instance with 2 threads.
Instances=screamernet instances (or even layout instances)

That applies to any use of LW's renderengine, no matter what kind of computations are involved, no matter how complex.

@lots have you tried screamernet on your machine? If not, it's really cool, especially with an easy approach with free harpoon :)

Mike

Dave Jerrard
11-10-2006, 12:04 AM
To answer the initial question though, Lightwave supports up to 16 threads at once. This means that you get one thread per core. Since Core 2 Quadro is a 4 core CPU, Lightwave can handle it. If you had 4 of these CPUs (say in a Xeon setup) then you'd have the maximum threads that LW supported. To get more you'd need to use a render farm type setup, but on a single machine. Then like mentioned earlier, you'd see a speed boost when rendering animations (and stills if the render manager supports it)What version of LW are you using? I've only ever seen it support up to 8 threads.

He Who Is Looking To Upgrade To A Pair Of Dual Core Opterons Soon.

duke
11-10-2006, 01:50 AM
Hardcore.


That's all I came here to say I'm sorry :(

Dave Jerrard
11-10-2006, 11:39 AM
Hardcore.


That's all I came here to say I'm sorry :(

Dammit! I just busted three mice, clicking on that word trying to open the link to the webpage, and there wasn't even a link! That's mean. :D


He Who Is Just Glad You Didn't Say Monkey-Butt, For Some Reason.