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View Full Version : Using the new Intel Mac as a virtual PC



heynewt
09-30-2006, 09:40 AM
I was over at a buddy's editing place, and he was running Final Cut on one of the new Intel Dual Core Macs. He also had some software that allowed him to run WinXP Pro on the Mac. Really nifty setup. He could run his Win programs on XP and then, with a button, switch over to Mac and edit in FCP.

I know LW runs fine on a Mac (I'm running it on a Powerbook right now), I'm just curious if anyone has tested it on one of the new Intel Macs with the virtual machine setup running their LW under WinXP. For a lot of reasons that would serve me better than running it under OSX, and gosh those machines are FAST.

Robert N.

Wickster
09-30-2006, 05:41 PM
from what i know, the virtual pc is emulated inside the mac. so running lightwave would be emulating lightwave while emulating windows and would be really-really slow. Paralllel Windows, is another program that lets you run windows inside OSX but takes advantage of the intel-cores insted of running in emulation though that also would probably mean like running a program inside a program that is running again inside a program.

dont quote me on that though cause i may very well be wrong.

boot camp who can let you run windows at startup is another option for intel-mac users but i haven't tried it yet because i lack the new windows xp with sp2 installation disk and boot camp requires the sp2 included with the xp disk.

heynewt
09-30-2006, 05:52 PM
Thanks for the reply. All that makes sense. Hearing second hand info now that says it runs pretty slow. I mean, if you're running MS Word or something you're not going to notice any difference, but LW or After Effects might really crawl.

I'll keep checking around.

robert

cresshead
09-30-2006, 07:20 PM
just to add:- bootcamp and xp run at full speed of an equivelent specc'd pc
other than the apple mac is actually cheaper and usually more stable running xp on a intel mac...i installed max 8.0 plus the max sp3 on the imac20" in the nottingham apple center and it run's very well on alls scenes i tested and rendered..both cores run as you'd expect..zero issues to report on that..mental ray, vertex editing and general rotaing views are all up to scratch...i set max to use open gl display rather than direct x as lightwave is opengl and open gl works just fine ...no issues with verts, edges or poly's being drawn in the max viewport which is more than i can say for my macmini [g4] running lightwave with errors on vertext display still being present and no bug fix...

trentonia
10-02-2006, 09:23 AM
Apparently, you can set the Mac up as a dual boot machine. There is a 3rd party software that allows this and Apple, in the next version of the OS, will have something called BootCamp allowing dual boot. I've seen some benchmark test that indicate running Windows XP is much faster than running the native Mac OS in most of the benchmark test.

Phil
10-02-2006, 01:34 PM
Problem is that dualbooting is a real pain. Eventually, the 'novelty' wears off and you'll probably find yourself spending all your time in one of the two operating systems. With enough memory, Parallels might suffice (although you lose 3D hardware accleration). It seemed very speedy last time I used it (for Windows under Linux)

BazC
10-03-2006, 12:38 AM
Apparently, you can set the Mac up as a dual boot machine. There is a 3rd party software that allows this and Apple, in the next version of the OS, will have something called BootCamp allowing dual boot. I've seen some benchmark test that indicate running Windows XP is much faster than running the native Mac OS in most of the benchmark test.

Firstly Bootcamp is already available but it's beta software. Secondly some OSX apps run slowly because they are not compiled to run on Intel processors. Macs have used PPC processors for years so Apple have included a PPC emulation environment (Rosetta) to run non universal binary applications. Because they are running under emulation they are slow. Applications which have been recompiled to run on either processor (hence universal binary) run just as well on OSX as they do on Windows.