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View Full Version : What is considered a shot and what is a plate?



SP00
09-23-2006, 09:26 PM
Hey guys,

Was reading a magazine and they said that ILM had 1100 shots for Priates of the Carribeans, but 600 of those shots were animated. I'm was a little confused by this. What is a "shot" in this context? Also, what do they mean by a plate? I know this is a newbie question in a the fx world, but I have no idea were to go to find out. Thanks in advance.

Stooch
09-24-2006, 07:30 AM
A plate is a high res still image/painting that is used for panning or to extend the set, when the camera is locked down the background typically stays static - allowing it to be painted/rendered/retouched without re-rendering every frame.

For example, a typical plate might contain clouds or the horizon, distant background, etc. Also known as matte paintings.

Shot is anything that requires multiple frames.

SP00
09-24-2006, 03:00 PM
Thanks, that makes it very clear, I guess I still go to learn a lot in terms of the lingual. However, what is a Shot? Is that a few frames of video between transition?

Bog
09-24-2006, 03:11 PM
I treat the term "Shot" as "Something that I then hand to the editor, which is more than 1 frame in length". Then again I'm self-taught.

Then again again, a lot of the time I'm the editor as well. Happy days....

RedBull
09-24-2006, 07:28 PM
However, what is a Shot? Is that a few frames of video between transition?

Pretty much yes a, a shot is usually considered any continual length of footage without an interupption. All taken in one take of the camera.

So a shot of earth from outerspace with the earth rotating could be 1000 frames, which would all be considered one shot, then cuts to a 'shot' at ground level. Some shots can last minutes, others in action scenes and vfx tend to take 3 months to do, for less than a seconds footage...

You would generally storyboard most important shots, but not every frame of animation.

In Pirates of the Carribean, one word EXPENSIVE, 300M+ movie....
You can tell just from those 600 animated shots, how long and hard it would be to do on animated shots....

Basically everytime the actor moves his head, the tentacles need to be matchmoved, which is easy on static shots, (fixed camera) but tends to take a lot of effort on animated matchmoving subjects.... such as with POTC...

SP00
09-25-2006, 08:02 AM
ok thanks, that pretty much sums it up.

lede
09-25-2006, 09:02 AM
Just out of curiosity which magazine were you reading about that?

-Lee

Scazzino
09-25-2006, 10:17 AM
Here's some information (http://www.actf.com.au/learning_centre/school_resources/teaching_kits/lia/units/lia_tk_cam.htm) that may be useful about shots, etc...

SP00
09-25-2006, 11:34 AM
Just out of curiosity which magazine were you reading about that?

-Lee

It was in Computer Graphics World. It is a pretty informative magazine. There aren't any tutorials, but tons of useful information about the industry in general.



Here's some information that may be useful about shots, etc...
great link, Thanks.

Stooch
09-25-2006, 12:40 PM
a single frame is usually called still :) but thats from my experience, im sure its correct to label even a single frame as a shot.

lede
09-25-2006, 03:11 PM
Thanks. I'll have to check them out and read the article. Reading those kind of articles are fun and educational and always looking for more information.

-Lee

Imatk
09-27-2006, 12:20 PM
Yeah I think it all depends on context.

We call any footage that we work with a "plate."

So if it's not CG it's generally called a plate. And if it's just one frame then it's usually called a "still."

But I'm sure for different applications the vocab varies.