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View Full Version : Atlantis back in the Black.



Bog
09-09-2006, 09:43 AM
It always does give me a heck of a thrill to see a successful Shuttle launch - I'm torn as to which is the most beautiful bit - seeing the Cape falling away behind the orbiter, or seeing the orbiter peeling away from the external tank.

Drooool.

Zane Condren
09-09-2006, 10:06 AM
Its a great thing to see them back in the black, the only thing was they didn't do the really pretty HD broadcast of this one like they did for the last one.

Lord Snarebotto
09-09-2006, 10:13 AM
HUmans and your pitiful spaceships.

You will all die horribly when my alien friends come to destroy you!

Muahahahahahahaha!

THREEL
09-10-2006, 01:48 AM
It always does give me a heck of a thrill to see a successful Shuttle launch - I'm torn as to which is the most beautiful bit - seeing the Cape falling away behind the orbiter, or seeing the orbiter peeling away from the external tank.

Drooool.

I just about got to see an actual shuttle launch once. They were getting ready to delpoy the Hubble Space Telescope. We were just 9 minutes away, when they scrubbed the launch due to a mechanical glich. I had a press pass, compliments of a local newspaper. So, I got to do everything the big press like ABC, CBS, and NBC got to do. It was pretty exciting, but, alas, the lauch was cancelled, and it took a long time before it actually launched. As far as cool images go, it's hard to decide, because there are so many. A few to mention are the still flaming SRB's separating from the external tank and falling back toward Earth, the white glow of the shuttle's three main engines, once the SRB's are clear, and let's not forget the vortexes that wisp off the shuttle's wing edges as the shuttle gently touches down during landing.


HUmans and your pitiful spaceships.

You will all die horribly when my alien friends come to destroy you!

Muahahahahahahaha!

Don't make me whip out a can of Wil Smith, Tommy Lee Jones, and MEN IN BLACK! Who's laughing now, huh? :lol:

kennez
09-10-2006, 02:14 AM
I just about got to see an actual shuttle launch once. They were getting ready to delpoy the Hubble Space Telescope. We were just 9 minutes away, when they scrubbed the launch due to a mechanical glich.


I've been lucky enough to see 3 Shuttle launches, a scrubbed Shuttle launch and an unmanned launch (along with a scrubbed shuttle launch in Houston).

The launches really were an amazing site, and something I will remember for a long time. It's just a pity that I never got to see a Saturn V launch (but since I wasn't born until about 10 years after Apollo 17, not much I can do about it!).

lilrayray77
09-10-2006, 05:36 AM
Mt dad is actually helping out on the construction of the mars rover so we get to go and watch the launch in 2008 with the other crew members who helped build the rover. Should be fun.

kmaas
09-10-2006, 08:15 AM
Mt dad is actually helping out on the construction of the mars rover so we get to go and watch the launch in 2008 with the other crew members who helped build the rover. Should be fun.

Oh, man. That would about be my dream job. I do hobby robotics, and I just love it. Boy, that'd be fun!

THREEL
09-10-2006, 10:45 AM
Mt dad is actually helping out on the construction of the mars rover so we get to go and watch the launch in 2008 with the other crew members who helped build the rover. Should be fun.

Sweet Ray! Actually, the town I live in, Bryan, OH, claims a Space Shuttle Commander as our own, because he was born here. His name is Tom Henricks. I got to meet his step-mom awhile back. She works for a library in another local town where I'm doing a video to promote their community. This town claims him too. Another town called Woodville, which is close to Toledo, claims him as well. I think he grew up there. Funny how people like to claim you when you become famous isn't it.

I hope I get a chance to see a shuttle launch before they scrap the program, because of the uniqueness of it. A shuttle launch/landing is a little bit like Marie and Donny Osmond (a little bit country, a little bit rock-and-roll), a little bit spaceship, a little bit airplane.:thumbsup: The new moon program while have a retro Apollo look. Hopefully, it will be safer with the crew on top of the rocket, instead of beside it. That's why the shuttle should remain unique for years to come.

Talk to you Later.

THREEL (AL)

Bog
09-10-2006, 11:03 AM
Oh - and Brent Jett? Best Shuttle commander's name, ev-ar. ;)

lilrayray77
09-10-2006, 11:07 AM
My dad doesnt work with robotics, he is a chemical engineer. He is using his experties to help design meatholds of extracting samples of the mars surface. I got to visit JPL (jet propultion laboratory) and see a duplicate of the last rover (they have one on mars an an identical one here for tests). We also got to see high res images of mars that had been taken only the morning before our arrival. If you are in LA look up JPL and see if you can get a tour; Im not sure if it is open to the public, but it is certainly worth the trouble of finding out.

Bladewing51
09-13-2006, 03:14 PM
I saw the suttle going up as I was going to work, it pays to live in Orlando sometimes, I stopped off at a parking lot to watch it, its a great thing to see. The best launch I witnessed was a early morning launch, we got out some binoculars and was able to see the whole process untill it disappears into orbit at which point it just looks like another star in the sky.

Scazzino
09-13-2006, 03:35 PM
It was great to see Atlantis bring the shuttle program back to real business!

So far only a few lost bolts... :thumbsup:

I've seen many shuttle launches on TV. I remember watching the very first shuttle launch (http://apod.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap010412.html) back when I was in high school... Unfortunately I never got to see a launch in person. The last time I was in Florida there weren't any launches...

At least my son gets to ride the shuttle every night on his BlastOff Bed (http://dreamlight.com/insights/12/welcome.html), though...:rock: when that weird little alien "Digit" isn't flying it that is... ;)

ednachman
09-13-2006, 03:49 PM
I remember a night launch in 1973 watched from Jacksonville, Florida. That's about 150 miles away from the Cape. It was dark and raining but you could actually see the red glow of the rocket. Before that I watched a launch from Jacksonville Beach, Florida. Approximately a few minutes later you could feel the vibrations of the lift off.

oDDity
09-14-2006, 02:12 AM
What is it about rockets that turn all you grown men into over-excited 10 year olds?

Bog
09-14-2006, 03:14 AM
What is it about rockets that turn all you grown men into over-excited 10 year olds?

Lots of things - from the sheer beauty and spectacle to it being a humongous act of optimism. Besides - anything that can get grizzled old line-animals, scarred from a thousand anencephalic clients to act like, as you say, over-excited 10 year olds can't be all bad.

ednachman
09-14-2006, 04:50 AM
What is it about rockets that turn all you grown men into over-excited 10 year olds?

10 years old is not a criteria for enthusiasm nor is the belief that everyone in the forum is male.

oDDity
09-14-2006, 05:30 AM
Dunno about that. I'd be happy to bet money that there are more aliens reading this forum than female humans.

Yep, I wish I had more enthuiasm for things, I seem to have lost it somewhere along the way.
I tend to rationalise things rather then get excited about them.
To me, a space shuttle is just a plane that carries extra fuel tanks and goes a bit higher.
I think it's becasue we are now living in an age where we can visualise almost anything being technologically possible, and only a matter of time and finance.

ednachman
09-14-2006, 06:51 AM
[QUOTE=oDDity] To me, a space shuttle is just a plane that carries extra fuel tanks and goes a bit higher.

I guess it's a point of view. For me shuttles go further OUT INTO SPACE rather than up.

oDDity
09-14-2006, 07:01 AM
As long as you are in orbit and being affected by earths gravity, I'd call it height above the surface.

Wonderpup
09-14-2006, 07:17 AM
there are more aliens reading this forum than female humans.

There's a difference? Seriosly, though, the lack of women in CG is strange. When I went to art college the women outnumbered the men two to one, so it's not that women aren't drawn to creative work. I guess it's the image of CG being 'techy' that causes the problem.

Interestingly one of best CG books I own was written by a woman- leigh van der byls texturing book- it's style is a bit more human than most books- like being talked to by a person rather than a technican.

oDDity
09-14-2006, 07:30 AM
Well, you wouldnt' say CG is a good way to meet girls, but my niece has just started art at college, and there are 14 girls and 2 boys in the class, so they're doing pretty well out of it.
Mind you, they're probably gay, but at least they'll have each other.

Scazzino
09-14-2006, 08:36 AM
What is it about rockets that turn all you grown men into over-excited 10 year olds?

Many things, that some apparently have lost, or never had... ;)

Go Atlantis! :thumbsup:

Bog
09-14-2006, 08:47 AM
I think it's becasue we are now living in an age where we can visualise almost anything being technologically possible, and only a matter of time and finance.

If that's the case, why do so many things - from the new Wembley Stadium, to the Big Dig in Boston to the Shuttle itself - fall foul of cock-ups?

It most surely has not all been done, and we cannot grasp everything we visualise. There are huge swathes of things which aren't technologically possible - which is why striving ahead with the tech we do have, even if it's the poor old mis-specified, mis-funded and over-compromised Big Black and White Transit Van, putting together a space station that was kinda sorta intended for semi-military use back when other countries had a military worth worrying about.

It's an endeavour. It's doing something different and new - it might not be a shipyard and waystation to Mars yet, but it's something. Something, I think, is generally better than nothing.

Then again, for myself I find the only way to hang onto wonder and excitement is to let myself feel those things. To actively seek out the good and amazing in the world, and not be embarassed about revelling in it.

Cynicism may be the new black, but I was never a big follower of fashion.

oDDity
09-14-2006, 09:37 AM
If that's the case, why do so many things - from the new Wembley Stadium, to the Big Dig in Boston to the Shuttle itself - fall foul of cock-ups?
Well that's simple - human error.
Most of us are lazy bastards wth a 'that'll do the job, let's knock off early' attitude, rather than a 'let's work overtime on this thing and do it to perfection' attitude.
IT always comes down to some avodiable silly human error. (except with the 'moon landings' which, for some unexplained reason, went perfectly, and they simply managed to knock up the tech in the 60's to take men to the moon and back in 8 years, with six months to spare before the deadline)


It most surely has not all been done, and we cannot grasp everything we visualise. There are huge swathes of things which aren't technologically possible - which is why striving ahead with the tech we do have, even if it's the poor old mis-specified, mis-funded and over-compromised Big Black and White Transit Van, putting together a space station that was kinda sorta intended for semi-military use back when other countries had a military worth worrying about.
What hasn't been done has been portrayed in movies so much as if it's reality, that when it becomes reality, it's no longer so amazing.
I don't think there's any limit to what science and technology will achieve, I fully expect it to achieve a cure for death, near light speed travel, matter transfer such as the star trek/the fly teleporters, dreamreality (where you hook up to a machne and it uses you brain's dream functions to play out /games/movies you can fully contol and interact with as reality) - so a souped up jet is nothing to get wet about.
Bring on the good stuff. I'm rather annoyed I won't be around to see all that good stuff, and have to make do with more modest inventions such as the internet and ipods.
It sucks.

art
09-14-2006, 09:48 AM
The first atomic bomb was developed in six years, $2 billion was thrown at it. There were no major errors or "bad" detonations. Everything went relatively smooth. Maybe it was the pressure to "win", just like it was the case with "moon landings". Maybe it was the management, maybe the people involved.

ednachman
09-14-2006, 09:52 AM
I'm rather annoyed I won't be around to see all that good stuff, and have to make do with more modest inventions such as the internet and ipods.
It sucks.

Someone told me that when he graduated high school in the late 1930's the principal of the school said, "I feel sorry for you because everything needed to be invented, has been invented." You may be around for a lot of exciting things. By the way Einstein said, "He doesn't know anything faster than the speed of light." which means there could be, so your comment of, "near light speed" may be superfluos. Stick around. The best is yet to be.

Wonderpup
09-14-2006, 11:06 AM
oDDity, have you considered the possibility that you are actualy living in the far future, and having tired of a life of relentless pleasure and fullfillment you have constructed your current reality in order to experience a more challenging existance?

oDDity
09-14-2006, 11:35 AM
Well, I doubt I'd do that without any way to get out of it.
Ok, I know you're going to say death is the off switch that ends this simulation and takes me back to the future, but I don't think I'll test that.
If it is true, I wish I hadn't made it quite so hard for myself. I must be a real hardcore masochist.
Indeed, I can't help noticing that some other people have made things quite easy for themselves when they were typing the settings into the machine.

The first atomic bomb was developed in six years, $2 billion was thrown at it. There were no major errors or "bad" detonations. Everything went relatively smooth. Maybe it was the pressure to "win", just like it was the case with "moon landings". Maybe it was the management, maybe the people involved.

That's the point I was making. If a big enough cheque had been written, we'd have a base on Mars by now. The tech is already there. It's lack of funding that's holding things back more than anything.

oDDity
09-14-2006, 11:49 AM
Someone told me that when he graduated high school in the late 1930's the principal of the school said, "I feel sorry for you because everything needed to be invented, has been invented." You may be around for a lot of exciting things. By the way Einstein said, "He doesn't know anything faster than the speed of light." which means there could be, so your comment of, "near light speed" may be superfluos. Stick around. The best is yet to be.

Near light speed is quite sufficent actually, due to time dilation, travel becomes almost instantanious at 99.9% light speed.
At actual light speed, travelling anywhere in the universe would literally be instantanious for the travellers.
The onyl problem being that it's a one way journey. If you travel to a star 100 million light years away at light speed, then immediately turn and come back, you'll find that 200 million years have passed here on earth, and if you go back to the spot you came from, 200 million years will have passed there as well.

bobakabob
09-14-2006, 12:14 PM
That's the point I was making. If a big enough cheque had been written, we'd have a base on Mars by now. The tech is already there. It's lack of funding that's holding things back more than anything.

True, though another major hurdle to overcome is psychological. Whereas the Apollo missions showed it was possible to reach the moon in a matter of days, it would take 6 months to reach Mars. It's hard to predict the effects of such an endurance test. The crew would face tremendous psychological as well as physical pressures both in space and on the surface of Mars, the atmosphere of which is lethal. NASA are apparently taking cabin fever seriously even more seriously as a factor which could impair the mission.

oDDity
09-14-2006, 01:46 PM
Well, astronauts and comonauts have been in the space station for longer than 6 months, and there is pretty decent gravity once you get to mars, once the actual base is built, the problems will not be that great.
Anyway, they're talking about more moon landings soon in preparation for manned mars missions, hopefully in wihtin 25 years.

Andyjaggy
09-14-2006, 08:03 PM
Last I recall reading Nasa's goal was to get back to the moon by 2020. You are right though if money were not part of the equation we would allready have been to Mars.

Bog
09-15-2006, 04:41 AM
14 tonnes of new truss. I didn't even know the ISS had a beer-gut... ;)

And shiny new 240-foot-wide solar panel arrays. Woo!

Between this and the continued evolution of Scaled Composite's space effort, I do beleive that Humanity may not die in it's own filth after all. Yay Science!

Stooch
09-17-2006, 01:26 PM
The filth you speak of is the product of our science.

starbase1
09-17-2006, 01:47 PM
Oh - and Brent Jett? Best Shuttle commander's name, ev-ar. ;)

No.

I can only assume that you are unfamilair with the ORIGINAL commander Wetherbee! (As heard on 'The Navy Lark', and played by John Pertwee...)

starbase1
09-17-2006, 01:57 PM
I was off sick with a filthy cold on friday, but the good bit was that I was able to watch the spacewalks live via a net feed! Now that is seriously cool!

I'm still not very impressed with the shuttle though - it struggles to get a couple of hundrend miles up - you could drive that far in a couple of hours. And it really is operating pretty much at it's limits.

A Soyuz TMA is a MUCH more reliable, tougher, machine. Gradual improvements have led to something rated to stay in space for the best part of a year. They don't need a whole new capsule for the circum lunar tourist flights they are planning, a Soyuz will do the job just fine.

The Apollo Astronauts went pretty much exactly a hundred times further han the LEO flights we are stuck with today. And I am not at all convinced that the new Orion vehicle can be made given that it has effectively a budget of what they can save by not spending money on other stuff...

There's a wonderful photo, (can't find a web copy right now) of Mir. There are 2 progress ferries docked to it. A soyuz is pulling away. Then you realise that the hoto is taken from a second Soyuz making for 5 spacecraft flying in formation...

Nick

Stooch
09-18-2006, 04:15 AM
lol gotta love those russians :)

one good thing for the shuttle is its reusability and cargo capacity. Although its much much more expensive and complex, hence the reliability issues.

Bog
09-18-2006, 05:22 AM
Well. "Reusability" is kind of a misnomer from something you have to pretty much rebuild from the massframe up each time you use it. However! It's the best we've got 'til Burt Rutan takes over the spaceways full-time, so I'm going to make with the 10-year old kid impersonation.

Scazzino
09-21-2006, 09:12 AM
Welcome home Atlantis! :thumbsup:

Bog
09-21-2006, 09:16 AM
Indeed! I missed the landing itself, but that seemed like a good run to me! 17.5 tonnes, by the bye, not 14. Silly me.

Feel good to have a space programme again - though I'm eagerly anticipating a Space Industry hot on it's heels!

Scazzino
09-21-2006, 09:24 AM
Indeed! I missed the landing itself, but that seemed like a good run to me!

Sure does. I just woke up in time to see the landing. They left a few bolts and some trash floating behind, but all went well!

:thumbsup:

Bog
09-21-2006, 10:53 AM
Sure does. I just woke up in time to see the landing. They left a few bolts and some trash floating behind, but all went well!

:thumbsup:

I thought it was hilarious with STS-114, Discovery's previous mission, when the brit astronaut lost a spatula from his kit on EVA, and the Shuttle crew refused to let him back in before he'd counted his remaining tools ;)

Scazzino
09-21-2006, 10:58 AM
I missed that one!

They had better be careful or the environmentalists are gonna start legal proceedings for littering space... ;)

BeeVee
09-22-2006, 02:03 AM
The amount of debris that's in NEO right now, I'm surprised it's not doing double duty as some kind of jury-rigged ozone shield as it is! :D

B

colkai
09-22-2006, 03:08 AM
The amount of debris that's in NEO right now, I'm surprised it's not doing double duty as some kind of jury-rigged ozone shield as it is! :D

B
I was saved from sunburn by a NASA Spatula - I can see the Daily Sport headline now. :p