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View Full Version : What are your storage solutions?



Paul Lara
05-26-2006, 10:29 PM
With all of the next generation storage, which one are you guys planning on using to archive your projects?

tmon
05-27-2006, 01:13 AM
A penny to Paul for posting this poll for Gary.

My real-world backups are presently going to good old, cheap IDE drives.
A ****e load of them.

I may move to SATA or firewire in the future, but IDE is giving me great bang for the buck right now...

ScorpioProd
05-27-2006, 01:47 AM
I voted for "other."

What is "other?" Other is mastering to HDV full-size tapes in a new Sony HVR-M25U deck. This is the same as mastering to DV now and then rendering to MPEG-2 for DVD, a MUCH more compressed format for delivery, later as needed, once consumers have the winning format player in their homes. The analogy being what would you rather re-edit from in the future? The low compression HDV MPEG-2 acquisition format, or the high compression AVC or VC-1 delivery format? And the fact that no HD disc is yet the winner. The choice is simple to me.

As for BD and HD-DVD, I've heard nothing suggesting their dual-layer versions will be out before next year, and all the burners I currently see are limited to single-layer, making them obsolete in a year. The same with XDCAM HD, which is based on BD. So, at most, these would be a second choice solution for me currently, and only as a DVD-ROM data storage of my HDV data, not as a playable disc. Again, an archive good for re-edits, not just copies.

Firewire/USB 2.0 drives are great and more and more affordable, but they still take up a lot of physical space, relatively.

Rev Pro, media too expensive, might as well get a HDD.

XDCAM, as explained above, single-layer till next year, EXPENSIVE drives till next year.

tmon
05-27-2006, 02:13 AM
Eugene, have HDV tapes been "rated" for archival purposes? I.e. is there a projected shelf life?

For example, I've been working on an archival project for an independent media group, and we heard (not yet confirmed) that DV stock was NOT recommended for archival purposes, only for acquisition. As opposed to say, the "old" standby BetaSP, which under optimal conditions should be able to hold up for 7 years, or likewise Digibeta.

This is a really good topic/question that Gary started (props to Paul for posting a poll here), and it's going to become a bigger issue as we continue moving ahead with HD....

Jim Capillo
05-27-2006, 04:30 AM
Firewire externals here

prospector
05-27-2006, 08:26 AM
Also IDE
large, cheap, and with 1 hotwire and a ribbon coming out the back slot of one of my compys, I can switch drives before booting without opening case.

but you didn't give the first choice for backups, floppy spanning :thumbsup: :D
like the 53 floppys from Amiga flyer

ScorpioProd
05-27-2006, 10:56 AM
Eugene, have HDV tapes been "rated" for archival purposes? I.e. is there a projected shelf life?

For example, I've been working on an archival project for an independent media group, and we heard (not yet confirmed) that DV stock was NOT recommended for archival purposes, only for acquisition. As opposed to say, the "old" standby BetaSP, which under optimal conditions should be able to hold up for 7 years, or likewise Digibeta.


I've never heard it said that "DV stock was not recommended for archival purposes" before. 100% of my videos produced in the last about 7 years are archived on DVCAM stock, and they play fine, I've went back to some old ones recently.

HDV, being the same data rate, would be no worse than DV on tape. I haven't heard any projected shelf life. It's tape, store it well, it should last a while.

Also, I would like to think my HDV archiving I do will have a winning consumer format to be converted to in no more than a few years. :)

But I see a difference between archiving a project versus an archive for a museum or something like that. I'm looking for an archive that I'll have maximum quality to repurpose in the future with re-editing. If I wanted just an archive to last longer to be able to view and copy like for a museum, then an optical disc solution would be my choice. Just as I currently burn archive DVDs on gold MAM-A discs with a projected lifespan of 100 years.

radams
05-27-2006, 01:40 PM
Hi All,

I'm voting along with the rest... "other"...

I will be looking at storage for offline and library with Hard drives. To be able to keep Terrabytes worth of material available...along with a new Technology...Holographic removable storage....

http://www.inphase-technologies.com/technology/index.html

http://www.inphase-tech.com/


This technology will allow 300 Gigs per disk and will get to be able to put 1.6 Terrabytes...Also the way that this technology reads and writes would allow for entire frames to be read more easily...It should be possible to even playback Full 2K material with the next gen or so off of this technology.

I know that Blur-Ray/Hd-DVD is being pushed but it holds too little and is too late for what I want to have in a storage medium...

I hope that others will see this new Holographic storage technology and help push this into the main stream. It is the ONLY technology that holds the promise of large fast realistic storage.

FWIW, I will NEVER own another Iomega product...For those who know me...I don't like to use the word "NEVER" so I hope that shows what I think of Iomega as a company and their always flawed technology and support.

Cheers,

ted
05-27-2006, 11:38 PM
I'd prefer Holographic also, but I gotta merge to something before that's ready.
Since we'll be capturing direct to files more and more, I'll probably archive the camera files to BR-DVD.
But you can bet I'll be saving a lot on hard drives for a long time still.

Bobt
05-29-2006, 07:57 AM
Someone did a price per gigabyte and it turns out hard disks are currently cheaper. DOH.. Who would have thought this would be true. So from a $ and cents kind of thing it seems that the hard disks are going to save you money.

I dont edit much any more but bought 4 SATA drives that will give me a Terra byte of online storage so I can get back into this during the summer.

Bob

Gary Robinson
05-29-2006, 10:02 AM
I currently archive with a combination of data dvds and firewire drives. For me, one of the coolest things about VT is how easy it is to make an uncompressed archive of a project. I get lots of 25 DVD packets and store them like books. We're in a transitional period so I'll probably wait to see who's left standing when the dust clears, but so far, bluray looks like a good next step when the prices drop (unless Iomega really drops their prices which they rarely do).

radams
05-29-2006, 11:17 AM
I currently archive with a combination of data dvds and firewire drives. For me, one of the coolest things about VT is how easy it is to make an uncompressed archive of a project. I get lots of 25 DVD packets and store them like books. We're in a transitional period so I'll probably wait to see who's left standing when the dust clears, but so far, bluray looks like a good next step when the prices drop (unless Iomega really drops their prices which they rarely do).

Gary,

I would caution going with ANY Iomega technology...
They've burned many in the past I don't see them changing their ways...so be forwarned that as cool as the spec sheet looks...their technology normally has issues along with quality control problems...

After being burned with them from bernolli, zip, jazz, etc.. I will NEVER give them another dime.

Cheers,

tonyvdb
05-29-2006, 12:17 PM
With all the hard drives prices coming down on ebay I am and will still use removable SCSI drives as they are far cheeper then going with other formats (at least for the short term). Duel layer DVDs are also a good format for now as well.

JReble
05-30-2006, 09:32 AM
While we have a few external firewire drives in use, I had to go with "other" as well. Since you did say "for archiving", then I would have to indicate my ready NAS network storage array. I've got 4 250G drives on a raid 5 redundant setup running over a gigabit network. That gives me a little over 750G of storage for all my archiving purposes. I can play clips with little or no problems over the network, but for editing use, I must move them back over to the video array. But you did say archiving use. To me this is the best route because my NAS is shared between my 4 VT systems and graphics stations, thus providing great resource sharing potential. I'm just waiting until I can get a 10Gb network in place.