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View Full Version : How many of you calibrated your screen ? + question



JML
05-08-2006, 09:46 AM
after looking on some different monitors at work and looking at our images,
they all look different and I wonder which one should be right..
(we used spider2Pro to calibrate some of our screens)


if I create an image on a calibrated screen and it looks right but then if I go on
a uncalibrated screen and looks bad, because regular people doesn't calibrate their screen, most people would see the 'wrong' thing.
whereas people that calibrate their screen would see the right thing..

so should we have uncalibrated or calibrated monitors?
(especially on LCD there are huge differences in contrast,brightness,color.. on screen which are or not calibrated)

I wonder how many people calibrate their screens.

Sarford
05-08-2006, 10:35 AM
Calibrating your screen has the most use (from a designers point of view) if you work for print. You calibrate your screen so the colors you see match the colors you get in print.

I can imagine if you work for television or movie, you calibrate your screen to deliver the most accurate end result to the stations or moviecompanies. The end result (aka on the viewers screen) will fluctuate much more though that the print endresult because the viewer can color-ajust his screen but he can't color-ajust the print stuff.

lunarcamel
05-08-2006, 10:54 AM
I design for print, tv and the web - as long as it leaves my desk the right way I'm happy.

Spider works great - highly recommended.

JML
05-08-2006, 11:30 AM
I think calibrating affects everybody..
(that's true it affects mostly print people, but not only them)

if people don't calibrate their screen, what they render on screen might not be what they I think it is..
if they see one of their image on their friend's monitor, they might scream..

I'm not talking about the red being 2.5% too red, I don't care about that..
but I do care when I see an image on one screen and when I go to the other
screen it look like that same image has 150% more brightness (and contrast maybe)

cohominous
05-09-2006, 07:03 AM
Calibrating is more crucial for print. It is mainly used to set up a reliable color workflow to the press. You take a calibrated monitor profile, a working colorspace, and profiles for the printer you have (or will use) and you get accurate reliable color. For the video world color bars combined with video tools (waveform and vectorscope monitors) ensure an accurate color flow. Sarford is right about the end user being able to adjust their monitors. That's why a few movies now come with some type of calibrating routine to help you calibrate your own tv.

jasond
05-09-2006, 07:35 AM
I don't want to fight over why things look different on different screens for presentation work.

It gives you the trump when you know the clients don't calibrate. Just ask them what temperature their monitor is set at, or if they've run the Adobe Gamma utility, etc. My clients don't know how and haven't.

I've heard "But you're the only one who calibrates, all the rest of us don't." So I have to point out the probability that the rest of them are neither following a standard nor even similar to each other unless by chance. It isn't as if they're all non-standard *and* uniform.

They stop asking me to fix their stuff by breaking my setup.

Politics, politics...

Jure
05-09-2006, 08:30 AM
I use Spider2 for calibrating and it works great. I do work for print though so that's mainly why I use calibration software.

Sarford
05-18-2006, 09:25 AM
Well, you can go at lengths to callibrate your setup, when you deliver your stuff you get a call from your client, asking why the video is so dark/ bright/ red/ green/ blue/ saturated/ unsaturated/ etc/ etc/ etc/, just because he adjusted his monitor last summer when the sun was shining so bright in his office and he never changed it back.
You can tell him everything about callibrating but he will never understand, so you go to his office, adjust his monitor for him and all but after another bright day he will call again why the stuff you send is so bright...
Unless you have clients who know what they are doing, unfortunatly those are few and far between...

;)

Safe Harbor
05-18-2006, 01:40 PM
Calibration is useful when you can control the final output display (projector, monitor, TV, etc), but if you're delivering to an outside party, you can't control their settings and have no idea if your extra work/expense will be worthwhile.

We recommend it for our customers who are in print, or those who need everything to match from camera ingest to edit to final output - say for a presentation at a trade show or a live switch.

We carry the gretagmacbeth (http://www.sharbor.com/vendors/GRE.html) line of calibration tools and find they are VERY well received.

private
05-18-2006, 09:23 PM
Use this to calibrate your monitor.

lesterfoster
05-18-2006, 11:14 PM
You have a very good point there.

Well, you can go at lengths to callibrate your setup, when you deliver your stuff you get a call from your client, asking why the video is so dark/ bright/ red/ green/ blue/ saturated/ unsaturated/ etc/ etc/ etc/, just because he adjusted his monitor last summer when the sun was shining so bright in his office and he never changed it back.
You can tell him everything about callibrating but he will never understand, so you go to his office, adjust his monitor for him and all but after another bright day he will call again why the stuff you send is so bright...
Unless you have clients who know what they are doing, unfortunatly those are few and far between...

;)

But what about the Macbeth Color Checker chart? Canít this be used to calibrate your digital camera, video cameras, Scanner, Printer, and monitor? Here are some links.
http://shop.store.yahoo.com/cinemasupplies/maccol.html
http://www.akdart.com/macbeth.html
http://www.efg2.com/Lab/Graphics/Colors/ColorCharts.htm

As far as I know, The Macbeth Color Checker chart is the industry standard.

Red_Oddity
05-19-2006, 07:38 AM
Well, it depends on your workflow i guess.
When doing post work and working in a completely linear workspace (as in gamma 1.0, all textures and foto's set back to a linear workspace) you need to adjust either your videocards LUT/gamma (or using a gamma profile program like Adobe Gamma Loader) or your monitors LUT/gamma (but not both).
Then again, this is some very very difficult material to explain, and i believe at the moment there's a thread on the Pigsfly Fusion forum going on on the whole subject. I'll try to find some lionks to some sites explaining this.

Sarford
05-19-2006, 08:09 AM
That would be great Red_Oddity. I think this color stuff is some complicated business.
Actualy I think you can reduce the color shifting wich happens when transfering your work to other mediums but you can never eliminate color shifting. This is especialy aperant in print work because your colors wil shift depending on the type of printing process used, the type of paper, the atmospheric conditions etc.
Color management can reduce it to some extend but never eliminate it.

So far I have never used it (and I work mostly in print). Strangly enough, the clients who are most concerned about the color shifting are the ones with the least knowledge of the printing process.
Most of the time I just don't mention the possibility of color shifting, it saves a lot of explaning and chances are they will never notice (if they do notice, just blame the print guy :P )

pureandapplied
05-22-2006, 05:51 AM
Every time I calibrate my screen (using the adobe thingy) it looks so terrible that I end up un-calibrating it so that it stops hurting my eyes. I just calibrate my brain by looking at my stuff on a broadcast monitor and comparing it to how it looks on my screen. Of course I work for telly and frankly when the end user sees it, who knows what it's going to look like. (I also have a crap telly as my worst case scenario monitor. Well actually I have the crap telly in my suite because I'm too cheap to shell out for a broadcast monitor)

kopperdrake
05-23-2006, 05:25 PM
Calibration is a 'mare! I actually don't use it in anger as I found it so convoluted and the benefits minimal in comparison to the work put in, but I do have Photoshop set up for either working in sRGB or Adobe RGB, depending on the output of the image file. It's worth noting that most companies set up to print photographic images (such as photobox.co.uk etc) use the sRGB colour space, whereas most print bureaus use Adobe RGB - so it's useful to have those 2 setups in Photoshop. I've found my printer - Epson Stylus 2100 - gives great colour reproduction compared to final printed brochures so if I have a colour critical image then I proof it on that. I also use a Process Colour Guide, a book of thousands of swatches for CMYK colours - then pick colours in Photoshop that need to be a certain colour, ie skies and compare them to a printed version. An invaluable book and it was hard to track down! Your monitor will never show the exact colours so I trust printed matter more - but then most of my work is for print :)

Speedmonk42
05-23-2006, 09:02 PM
Uh oh.